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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Developing Digital Citizens by Dr. Alec Couros

Slides from a recent presentation....

 

 “Digital citizenship isn’t just about   recognizing and dealing with onlinehazards. It’s about building safe spaces &   communities, understanding how tomanage personal information, and about being Internet savvy - using your online presence to grow & shape your world in asafe, creative way, and inspiring others to         do the same.” (Digizen)  


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Digital Citizenship, by Andrew Churches

Digital Citizenship, by Andrew Churches | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Global Digital Citizenship is a critical element of any teaching program at any level. Our students are connected. Irrespective of the age of the student, they are wired. We are seeing devices reducing in cost, increasing in availability, and entering most classrooms and almost every school."

 

[...]

"...how do we teach Global Digital Citizenship, a fluency that is critical at all levels of education?

1. Clarity and rationale—Whether we are giving the students guidelines (my personal preference) or sets of rules, there must be clarity and a transparent rationale behind the statements we make."

2. Understanding and Purpose—This is the communication aspect with the students and the community. You have to develop and instill in the students an understanding of WHY we are making these recommendations and setting these expectations.

3. Monitoring and consequences—As critical as rationale and purpose, monitoring and consequences should be transparent, timely, and appropriate.

4. Individual and community involvement—In developing and implementing our digital citizenship guidelines and processes we sought, valued, and used feedback from staff, students, and the community."
 

 

 


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A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: 60 Sites for Digital Storytelling Tools and Information

A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet: 60 Sites for Digital Storytelling Tools and Information | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Great source for digital storytelling!


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Kirsten Wilson's curator insight, April 4, 2014 9:59 AM

Great curation of information and resources to consider.

Ali Anani's curator insight, April 5, 2014 12:08 PM

A quite informative post

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Data Story: Mél Hogan on Digital Archiving

Data Story: Mél Hogan on Digital Archiving | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Posted by Elaine Ellis:

"Mél Hogan is a digital archivist doing a two-year research fellowship in digital curation for her post doc at CU Boulder."

 

Interview:

"1. What are the big concerns among digital archivists?

Generally I think digital archivists who focus on the web are concerned with the quantity of information continuously created and shared across the globe, tracking this proliferation, its speed, and the various networks through which data travels. The big concerns are around the interplay of these things; for traditional librarians and archivists this has meant a shift to a hybrid role, as custodians and as mediators. Offline: media format management, migration, and interoperability continue to pose serious problems to preservation, as is it traditionally understood in those institutions."

 

The rest of the interview here: http://blog.gnip.com/mel-hogan-digital-archiving/

 

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Digitising your collection – Part 4: Scanning and handling tips

Digitising your collection – Part 4: Scanning and handling tips | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Also of interest:Digitising your collection – Part 3: Technical specifications (http://archivesoutside.records.nsw.gov.au/digitising-your-collection-part-3-technical-specifications/) ; Digitising your collection – Part 2; The Golden Rule of Digitisation (http://archivesoutside.records.nsw.gov.au/digitising-your-collection-part-2-the-golden-rule-of-digitisation/)  – Part 1: Project Planning (http://archivesoutside.records.nsw.gov.au/digitising-your-collection-part-1-project-planning/)

 

 

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UI News: Expert on digital archiving and the law, by Kyle Rimkus - Newsroom America

UI News: Expert on digital archiving and the law, by Kyle Rimkus - Newsroom America | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

A MINUTE WITH LIBRARIAN KYLE RIMKUS ON DIGITAL ARCHIVING AND THE LAW:

 

"Editor’s note: In what has been described as a major victory for the digital humanities, a federal court earlier this month ruled against the Authors Guild in favor of the HathiTrust, a massive digital archive of library materials converted from print that is co-owned and managed by a partnership of more than 60 academic institutions, including the University of Illinois. Kyle Rimkus, preservation librarian at the U. of I., talked with News Bureau news editor Dusty Rhodes about the impact of this ruling."


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Challenges to a new Digital Archivist « FSU Special Collections...

Challenges to a new Digital Archivist « FSU Special Collections... | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"I'm Krystal Thomas, digital archivist with Special Collections at Florida State University. I am new in my position, just starting this past summer. I am not new to the world of digital collections, but as I have learned quickly..."

"Your decisions might not be as obvious as you think

This advice goes back to the “document everything” mantra but deserves its own line: no one is a mind reader, and no one coming after you will be faced with the same set of challenges, resources, and expectations again. There were probably very good, logical reasons why you made the decisions you did when it comes to a digital collection you are working on, but if you don’t record those somewhere, no one–not your supervisor, intern, or even you ten years down the road–will know that and be able to explain that to others moving forward."
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British Library tracks rise and fall of file formats, by Simon Sharwood

British Library tracks rise and fall of file formats, by Simon Sharwood | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @dhgermany: British Library tracks rise and fall of file formats http://t.co/mKz4Qhyk via @regvulture...

 

By Simon Sharwood, APAC Editor 


"File formats and the software capable of reading them are living longer than previously thought, according to a British Library and UK Web Archive study.

Formats over Time: Exploring UK Web History (PDF, slides as PDF) considers 2.5 billion files author Andrew N Jackson retrieved with the help of the Internet Archive and the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC). All the files come from “the UK web domain” and come from the period between 1996 and 2010."

 

"Our initial analysis supports Rosenthal's position; that most formats last much longer than five years, that network effects to appear to stabilise formats, and that new formats appear at a modest, manageable rate.

But he also warns that “a number of formats and versions that are fading from use, and these should be studied closely in order to understand the process of obsolescence.” ®"

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Digital Library at Bucharest Metro Station - QR codes

Digital Library at Bucharest Metro Station - QR codes | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Just scan the QR code to read the book!" 

 

Fantastic!

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Bringing History to the Future: How Libraries Are Reinventing Photo Collections | TechSoup for Libraries

Bringing History to the Future: How Libraries Are Reinventing Photo Collections | TechSoup for Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Libraries are using new technologies to are breathing new life into their digital photo collections. At the Future of Libraries 8.0 conference in San Francisco, librarians from the San Jose Public Library and the San Francisco Public Library discussed how they're using geocoding, crowdsourcing, and augmented reality with their digital photo archives."

[...]

"With Scan Jose open on your mobile phone or browser, you can view historic images from the collections of the San Jose Public Library and the Sourisseau Academy while actually visiting the locations those pictures were originally taken in. The San Jose Public Library encourages users to write comments and add to the collective history of the city. To use Scan Jose, simply enter www.scanjose.org on your smartphone or tablet browsers (iOS, Android, Blackberry, or Windows Mobile). Of course, you'll have to actually be physically in the city of San Jose to get the full effect."

 

"The best part about these projects is that it required no expenses on the part of the San Francisco Public Library. They simply advertised the projects via social media and people got excited and wanted to participate. The librarians at both SJPL and SFPL encourage other libraries to explore other ways to present their digital photo archives. You never know what a local history buff/programmer might come up with!"


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Digital history could be lost forever due to changing devices, says expert

Digital history could be lost forever due to changing devices, says expert | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

BY CLAIRE CONNELLY:

"HISTORIANS will be facing a black hole when it comes to studying the 20th and 21st centuries because much of our digital history is stored on technology that no longer have devices to read them, experts claim.

The information stored on everything from floppy disks to CDs, mobile phones to cameras is at risk of being lost forever, Canadian information security consultant Robert Slade told News Ltd.

"There was a sci-fi story from years ago about how all the knowledge in the universe was put into a huge storage library and then it got lost because nobody knew how to access it," Mr Slade said.

"That is getting to be frightening close to reality."

"It's rather ironic for the 'social media age', n'est ce pas," Mr Slade said. 

Right now, the only solution is to continually transfer information from one device to another as old technologies die and other forms of media take their place.


And don't think cloud storage is a solution. That carries with it all kinds of problems, Mr Slade said.

Cloud service providers can lose, corrupt or make mistakes with data. Even worse, what if the company goes bust?"

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/technology/digital-history-could-be-lost-forever-due-to-changing-devices-says-expert/story-e6frfro0-1226466893848#ixzz25ldicQrI

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Archivists file in for digital congress "A climate of change" - PS News #ICA2012

"More than 1,000 archivists from 90 countries have come to Brisbane this week to try and solve the challenges of the digital age.

   Hosted by the National Archives of Australia, the International Council on Archives (ICA) Congress is being held until Thursday (24 August) at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre.
   The ICA is dedicated to the effective management of records and the preservation, care and use of the world’s archival heritage through its representation of records and archive professionals around the world."

 

Full program can be accessed here: http://ica2012.com/files/data/program/Program-matrix-1508.pdf

 

1,000 meet to explore challenges   

It is the first time the four-yearly congress has been held in Australia and this year’s theme A Climate of Change will be explored by a number of keynote speakers including the Head Archivist for the United States of America, David Ferreiro, who will present the topic, ‘Archives in a world of social media’.

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Digital Preserving Digital Objects With Restricted Resources | NIU to help libraries avoid ‘bit rot’ - Daily Chronicle

By NICOLE WESKERNA:

"DeKALB – With the help of a $575,000 grant, a group of university librarians and curators hope to have an answer to a growing problem.

Lynne Thomas, curator of rare books and special collections at Northern Illinois University’s Founders Memorial Library, learned in October that NIU, along with four other universities, secured a grant to study the best practices for storing digital data.

The federal National Leadership Grant came from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

“Libraries have been taking on digital objects for the last 10 to 15 years,” she said. “The grant will help us learn how to scale [the process] down for institutions with fewer resources.”

With the passage of time, storage devices can degrade over time, a phenomenon known colloquially as “bit rot.”

Thomas said saving digital objects such as PDFs and video files from bit rot is a problem librarians and archivists have been working to solve for years.

But it’s mostly large, well-funded institutions that can afford today’s archiving systems.

Librarians and curators from Chicago State University, Western Illinois University, Illinois Wesleyan University and Illinois State University are joining NIU in a group called Digital Preserving Digital Objects With Restricted Resources."

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School libraries changing with move to digital resources, By Laura Devaney | eSchool News

School libraries changing with move to digital resources, By Laura Devaney | eSchool News | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
As schools across the nation move from printed books to digital books, school #libraries are adapting to keep pace http://t.co/A7rqftJE...

 

"One of the biggest parts of the library is the learning studio, which is a place where students can go to create different digital resources such as audio and video recordings, multimedia pieces, or link up to share ideas and brainstorm. The learning studio offers facilitators and tech specialists to help students when necessary.

“People often say that the library is going away,” McConnell said. “It’s really not—it’s a critical piece. It’s a place for community, collaboration, and it’s a place to find partners to help you in whatever literacy you’re trying to increase. That may be literacy in resources, media creation—those services are all there.”

And the stereotypical librarian is evolving into someone who knows how to locate reputable online resources and can help students learn how to use those resources in their research.

“I see librarians as media specialists,” McConnell said. “We still have literacy, whether it’s reading or research…the librarian is the perfect partner for the classroom. The role of the librarian has shifted” for the digital age, he said."

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Create Your Own Digital Document Library on the Web with Invenio, by Robin Good

Create Your Own Digital Document Library on the Web with Invenio, by Robin Good | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

 

Robin Good: "Invenio is an open-source software allowing anyone to build and maintain a professional document library on the web.

 

Invenio provides all the tols needed to coordinate all of the aspects of digital library management, from document ingestion through classification, indexing, and curation to dissemination.

 

Invenio complies with standards such as the Open Archives Initiative metadata harvesting protocol (OAI-PMH) and uses MARC 21 as its underlying bibliographic format. Invenio outputs / exports its contents in multiple formats including: HTML, XML, OAI, MARC.

 

Invenio has been originally developed at CERN to run the CERN document server, managing over 1,000,000 bibliographic records in high-energy physics since 2002, covering articles, books, journals, photos, videos, and more."

 

Key features: http://invenio-software.org/wiki/General/Features

 

Sites already using it: http://invenio-software.org/wiki/General/Demo

 

More info: http://invenio-software.org/

 

P.S.: You will need a technical person to download and install the Invenio software.

(Download page: http://invenio-software.org/wiki/Installation/Download)

 

 


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Hooray, we're digital natives – so who preserves our culture? #BigData #archives

Hooray, we're digital natives – so who preserves our culture? #BigData #archives | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Sue McKemmish & Andrew Wilson:

"It’s estimated that in 2011 a truly staggering 1.8 zettabytes of digital information was created. Or to put it in more meaningful terms, that’s 57.5 billion 32-gigabyte iPads full.

Recent articles about this “digital deluge” warn of an approaching “digital dark age” if this vast amount of digital information isn’t preserved for posterity.

The old refrain that “storage is cheap, just keep everything” was never true. Recently the global market intelligence firm IDCestimated that the world’s demand for storage is increasing by 60% a year.

Given market research firm IHS iSuppli estimates hard disk storage densities will only improve by 19% a year for the next five years, and IT budgets are growing at an annual rate between 0 and 2%, there is clearly a looming storage crisis.

 

 

The challenges involved in preserving the huge datasets created by governments, businesses and research institutions have prompted some dire predictions about the loss of digital history."

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To Share Or Not To Share? - By Rick Anderson

To Share Or Not To Share? - By Rick Anderson | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

What is "sharing" between and among libraries?

 

"In the digital realm, what is typically referred to as “sharing” is actually copying—sometimes legal and sometimes not. Understandably, the ease and ubiquity of uncontrolled copying in a networked digital environment makes copyright holders uneasy. And the fuzzy line between copying and sharing in that environment also makes the question of what it means for libraries to “share” resources much more complicated than it might seem at first blush."

Should libraries share, or not?

 

"We don’t (or shouldn’t) share because 'sharing is what we do as libraries,' still less because sharing is somehow a 'core value' of librarianship. Sharing is a means, not an end. We share in order to provide access, and to the degree that 'sharing' actually means 'copying,' it is legally and ethically complicated."

 

"We live in a radically different information world from the one that gave rise to ILL. Instead of resisting that reality, we should embrace it, rejoicing in the ways it allows us to serve our patrons better."

 

Read more here:  http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/10/opinion/peer-to-peer-review/to-share-or-not-to-share-peer-to-peer-review/


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Enabling the Research ‘Flow’ and Serendipity in Today’s Digital Library Environment – Library Hat

Enabling the Research ‘Flow’ and Serendipity in Today’s Digital Library Environment – Library Hat | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Enabling the #Research ‘Flow’ and Serendipity in Today’s Digital #Library Environment http://t.co/ZZ2SC9hV #Librarians #DigitalLibrary...

 

by Bohyun (Library Hat).:

"The fact that today’s libraries no longer control the physical surroundings of a library patron who is making use of their resources doesn’t mean that there are nothing libraries can do to make the research environment facilitate serendipitous discoveries and the state of ‘flow’ in a researcher’s mind, however. Today’s libraries offer many different systems for library users to access their online resources. As I have mentioned above, the interfaces of these systems can use some vast improvement in usability. When there are as few hindrances as possible for a library patron to get to what s/he is looking for either online or at the physical library space, s/he would be able to concentrate on absorbing the content more easily instead of being bogged down with procedures. The seamless interoperability between different systems would be very much desirable for researchers. So, improving the usability of library systems will take library patrons one step closer to obtaining the flow state in their research while using library resources online."

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