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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Future U: Library 3.0 has more resources, greater challenges | Ars Technica

Future U: Library 3.0 has more resources, greater challenges | Ars Technica | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Curt Hopkins:

"Libraries are changing, despite their facades. And they're changing to high-tech service companies with embedded librarians, according to some library professionals."

 

"This transition time is one of great opportunity for those involved in libraries, but all transitions, all borders and verges, are places of great vulnerability as well. Grand changes are possible here, but so are operatic failures. The future seems promising. It’s the present that worries some librarians.

“The myth that the information scholars need for research and teaching is, or soon will be available for free online is a dangerous one,” said Bourg, “especially when it is used as an excuse to cut funding to libraries. Right now libraries face enormous but exciting challenges in maintaining print collections and services where they are still necessary, while simultaneously developing strategies for collecting, preserving, organizing, and providing access to digital objects. I fear that if libraries across the nation don’t get the resources we collectively need to meet these challenges that we may be at risk of losing big chunks of our cultural record because of a lack of funding for digital collecting and preservation."

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South Brunswick Public Library Blog: When it comes to eBooks ...

South Brunswick Public Library Blog: When it comes to eBooks ... | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Ever wonder why many of your favorite authors aren't available in an eBook or eAudiobook format from New Jersey libraries? The answer might surprise you..."

 

• Publishers who refuse to sell eBooks and/or eAudiobooks to libraries;
• Publishers who charge libraries as much as 5 times more than consumers for the same digital content;
• Publishers who embargo their content and will not sell to libraries any newly published digital content;
• Publishers who make digital content available in only some formats (ePub but not Kindle for example).

For years libraries have worked hand in hand with publishers. That relationship has now changed drastically and we find ourselves unable to deliver the digital content library patrons want."

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Scholars and the Public Can and Must Co-Exist - Howard Dodson / New York Times #libraries

Scholars and the Public Can and Must Co-Exist - Howard Dodson / New York Times #libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Scholars and the Public Can and Must Co-Exist New York Times

Howard Dodson Jr., director of the Howard University library system, was formerly the director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem, part of the New York Public..."

 

"The plan to renovate the New York Public Library’s main building is a return to the past as well as a gateway to the future. It does not pose the threats to scholarship that many of its critics assert.

The plan, more than a decade old, was the library’s initial response to the post-9/11 economic crisis that challenged the futures of all cultural institutions. The New York Public Library could not sustain four research centers and 85 branch libraries.Then, the digital revolution, coming on the heels of 9/11, forced all libraries to rethink their identities and missions."

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Special Collections Librarianship: a Brief Map of the Field by Katie Birkwood - Slideshare

Presentation about special collections librarianship compiled for the CILIP New Professionals Day 2012 (11 May, London).

 

This presentation is all about special collections, what they are, the functions of a special collections librarian, how to get into special collections, and the role of special collections librarianship.


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
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Libraries and Social media | DianeVautier.com

Libraries and Social media | DianeVautier.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by DIANE VAUTIER:

"U.S. libraries of all types continue to make increasing use of social media and Web 2.0 applications and tools to connect with library users and to market programs and services according to the American Library Association.

 

"But change still continues to be a major factor when it comes to adding social media and web 2.0 to the library mix. Shift happens and will continue to drive change, specifically when it comes to content creation and content curation.

Librarians would do well to follow the same steps as does small business when it comes to content creation using social media:

Find your audience

Set your goals

Start with the basics and optimize those accounts Build a team

Create a Content Map

Link accounts – Connect, connect ,connect – your social network.

 

Content curation is where libraries and librarians have a natural advantage because it’s already what they do everyday. Librarians have content curation super powers.  Now that content curation has moved from an in-person resource to an online resource however, librarians are in a unique position to help patrons manage the online information overload, and they can use social media tools to do it. Social media can help libraries become more highly visible and useful to the communities they serve.

If you’d like additional information on this presentation, you can find the slide deck on SlideShare and the full video on Vimeo."

http://www.slideshare.net/dvautier/libraries-and-social-media

 

http://vimeo.com/42157533

 

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A Tribute to Special Libraries and Collections: NPR Library

A Tribute to Special Libraries and Collections: NPR Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Catherine:  

"Special libraries are found within many different types of organizations, such as broadcast networks. Many have internal libraries and librarians which provide archival, research, information retrieval and reference services. These library collections are often closed to the public, focused on serving the needs of direct staff and affiliates. Librarianship within media organizations is a fascinating part of special libraries. In an article from American Journalism Review, in 1995, the 'news librarian' was described as, "the collectors, managers, and re-distributors of the organization's primary product, information. This is critical in all stages of information's flow through the organization – initial information gathering for use in news reporting, in the collection of the news product into databases, in the repackaging of information created by the organization into new products." Much has changed in the industry in the last fifteen years, however the role of collector and manager of the organization's content is still a vital one.

NPR is a non-profit privately and publicly funded membership media organization. The content produced by NPR is nationally syndicated to over 900 public radio stations in the United States. The NPR library does not have a publicly accessible website, as their collections are not available for circulation and reference outside of NPR affiliated patrons. The collection consists of archival audio of NPR produced shows, collections of commercial music and spoken word (films, tv shows, speeches, poetry). Library staff do have a twitter account that is well worth following. The tweets often highlight stories on the NPR website such as this one about the The Most Gigantal, Behemothian Thesaurus In The World"

 

- Includes links to all related websites of NPR.

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Musings about librarianship: How is Google different from traditional Library OPACs & databases?

Musings about librarianship: How is Google different from traditional Library OPACs & databases? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Aaron Tay: "It's a truism in library circles today to say that Google and web search engines (I will use "Google" as a stand in for web search engines) have changed the way users search which in turn affects what they expect from searches in the library."

 

"This article discuss the differences in default searches,  starting from features that are totally accepted": http://musingsaboutlibrarianship.blogspot.com/2012/05/how-is-google-different-from.html


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
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Librarians are go: How to raise your profile within and without the school community

Librarians are go: How to raise your profile within and without the school community | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Stacey Taylor:

"We need to encourage quality teachers into the Teacher Librarian fold and to ensure that there are jobs for them to go to. We need to sell our wares to our own communities so that we become planning, teaching and change ...

 

'So how might we do this?

Go to as many faculty meetings as possible, offer your services whenever possible to whoever will work with you.
Develop some expertise that is unique and useful to your community.
Write and publish wherever possible
Talk to teachers and then talk some more
Make connections in person and online
Build relationships
Share successes and opportunities for learning
Project energy and enthusiasm
Take on projects that others may not think of
Partner with people that will help you further your aims."

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Ariadne article: Perceptions of Public Libraries in Africa | EIFL

Ariadne article: Perceptions of Public Libraries in Africa | EIFL | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @EIFLnet: Ariadne article: Perceptions of Public Libraries in Africa http://t.co/mA5rlBiX...

 

"The article “Perceptions of Public Libraries in Africa” has been published in Ariadne, a peer-reviewed open access magazine for information professionals.
In the article, Monika Elbert, David Fuegi and Ugne Lipeikaite summarise and describe the principal findings of the study Perceptions of Public Libraries in Africa commissioned by EIFL Public library Innovation Programme (PLIP) which served to provide evidence of how public libraries are perceived by stakeholders and the public towards public libraries in six African countries.
The authors write:
"The goal of the study was to understand the perceptions of national and local stakeholders (municipalities, ministries, public agencies, media, etc.) and the public (including non-users) in respect of public libraries in Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe about the potential of public libraries. It also aimed to understand how these stakeholders could best be positively influenced to create, fund, support or to use public libraries. It is hoped that stakeholders in the countries studied will choose to assess the findings as a potential tool to improve library management and advocacy."

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iLibrarian » Create Your Own Library Social Media Monitoring Dashboard through Protopage

iLibrarian » Create Your Own Library Social Media Monitoring Dashboard through Protopage | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Create your own social media monitoring dashboard." - Valuable to all libraries, archives and museums


Via Stephanie Sandifer, Dennis T OConnor
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New survey confirms librarians’ commitment to protecting privacy rights | American Libraries Magazine

New survey confirms librarians’ commitment to protecting privacy rights | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
American Libraries Magazine, the magazine of the American Library Association, delivers news and information about the library community.

 

Jennifer Petersen:

"Some of the highlights from the 2012 survey include:

1. Librarians remain concerned about privacy and individuals' desire to control access and use of personal information. Ninety-five percent agree or strongly agree that individuals should be able to control who sees their personal information, and more than 95 percent of respondents feel government agencies and businesses shouldn’t share personal information with third parties without authorization and should only be used for a specific purpose.
2. Librarians affirmed their commitment to the profession's long-standing ethic of protecting library users' privacy. Nearly 100 percent of respondents agreed that “Libraries should never share personal information, circulation records or Internet use records with third parties unless it has been authorized by the individual or by a court of law,” and 76 percent feel libraries are doing all they can to prevent unauthorized access to individual’s personal information and circulation records. Overall, nearly 80 percent feel libraries should play a role in educating the general public about privacy issues.
3. When compared to the 2008 survey, the results showed that the responses given by the 2012 respondents generally mirrored those of the 2008 respondents, with data showing a slight decline in the level of concern over privacy. For example, in both surveys, the vast majority (95 percent in 2008, 90 percent in 2012) of respondents expressed concern that "companies are collecting too much personal information about me and other individuals." However those who “strongly” agreed dropped from 70 percent in 2008 to only 54 percent in 2012."

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Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete » Virtual Dave @rdlankes

Beyond the Bullet Points: Libraries are Obsolete » Virtual Dave @rdlankes | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

R David Lankes:

A librarian plays devil's advocate for those who argue libraries are obsolete (but there is a happy ending).

 

"There are few of us who can know the exact moment their career ended. However when a professor of library science argues libraries are obsolete against a Harvard law school professor and the head of the lead funding agency in the field I think that moment has arrived. This was where I found myself April 18th when I took part in an Oxford-style debate as part of Harvard Library Strategic Conversations. The idea was to mix humor with serious debate on the proposition that “Libraries are Obsolete.” I was asked to argue for the proposition.Now this is a rather odd position to be in since I have spent my career arguing exactly the opposite, but in the spirit of playing devil’s advocate, and the fact that I have tenure, I jumped in. After all, if we don’t honestly debate the point, how can we truly be sure we are not headed towards obsolescence [more on my rational see this post]."

http://quartz.syr.edu/blog/?p=1557

 


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How can Libraries Support Students Live and Learn with Digital Media?

How can Libraries Support Students Live and Learn with Digital Media? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

C. Shoemaker, H. Martin, B. Joseph (2010) How Using Social Media Forced a Library to Work on the Edge in Their Efforts to Move Youth From “Hanging Out” to “Messing Around, Journal of Media Literacy Education 2:2 (2010) 181 – 184

 

Full Text Research Paper.

 http://altechconsultants.netfirms.com/jmle1/index.php/JMLE/article/view/123/78

 

 

"In 2009, Mimi Ito released Hanging Out, Messing Around and Geeking Out: Living and Learning with New Media, a book composed of 23 related studies. These ethnographic studies interrogated how learning is being experienced by teens via informal uses of digital media. The title refers to the framework around how youth learn through digital media and networked spaces, a kind of learning that is quite often invisible to adults who often confuse it with playing, wasting time or, at worst, as undermining youth’s ethical values and social competencies. This collection of studies, however, finds that these three different modes of participation with digital media, in fact, support the development of a wide range of new media literacies. This is the challenge offered by Ito and the one recently taken up by the New York Public Library. This worked example is not designed to report the successes or failure of this pilot project. Rather, it is intended to explore and take a critical look at the obstacles encountered along the way and discuss how they were negotiated. Finally, it will leverage Ito’s framework to provide context to understand what it means to use digital media for learning and how to apply these lessons learned, both for this organization and others."


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New Introducing the Library Marketing Toolkit website! – Stephen's Lighthouse

New Introducing the Library Marketing Toolkit website! – Stephen's Lighthouse | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The Library Marketing Toolkit website, by Ned Potter! [@theREALwikiman]

 

"The site is essentially designed to give you lots of practical advice on how to market your library – be that public, academic, special or archive. There are tools and resources, lots of useful links, new case studies which will be added to on an ongoing basis, and there’s info about the Library Marketing Toolkit book and its contributors.

There’s also a blog, which will give tips and aim to highlight the best (and sometimes the worst) marketing from libraries around the world. The first post is Marketing libraries with new technologies: what you need to know, and what to do next and features this presentation, which I gave yesterday at an Academic and Research Libraries Group conference on new technologies in libraries”

 

Blog post: Marketing libraries... http://www.librarymarketingtoolkit.com/2012/05/marketing-libraries-with-new.html

 


Via Guus van den Brekel
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UN builds 30 libraries for deprived schools in Ghana - GhanaWeb

"Mrs Dho Young-Shim, Chairperson, Board of Directors, UN MDG Advocacy Group based in South Korea, on Wednesday inaugurated the 29th UN sponsored library for the Freeman Methodist School in Prampram in the Greater Accra Region.

The project dubbed “Thank You Small Library (TYSL)”, is the 29th school library to be constructed by the UN in public schools across the country in collaboration with the Ministry of Tourism.

The TYSL formed part of the United Nations’ World Tourism Organization’s Sustainable Tourism Eliminating Poverty (STEP) programme, which are organised in collaboration with the Ministry of Tourism in beneficiary countries."

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LIS Trends: New IMLS Report: “Libraries and Museums in an Era of participatory culture"

LIS Trends: New IMLS Report: “Libraries and Museums in an Era of participatory culture" | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"New from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the Salzburg Global Seminar.

From the Summary Announcement:

The report details the events of the October, 2011 convening of fifty-eight library, museum, and cultural heritage leaders from thirty-one countries. Together, the participants developed a set of recommendations to help libraries and museums embrace new possibilities for public engagement that are made possible by societal and technological change.

The deliberations identified “imperatives for the future” including accepting the notion of democratic access, placing a major emphasis on public value and impact, and embracing lifelong learning.

Building on the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) initiative The Future of Museums and Libraries as well as on past museum and library sessions convened by the Salzburg Global Seminar, this session brought together library and museum leaders, cultural and educational policymakers, cultural sector researchers, representatives of library and museum education programs, technology experts, sociologists, journalists, and library and museum associations.

The report captures rich perspectives about the changing roles and responsibilities of libraries and museums. The publication describes each of the five plenary sessions and the working group recommendations that resulted from them: culture and communities; learning transformed; building the skills of library and museum professionals; and demonstrating public value. It includes descriptions of innovative case studies from around the globe and a summary of the concluding keynote lecture given by Vishakha Desia, president and chief executive officer of the Asia Society.

 

Full Summary Announcement: http://www.imls.gov/new_report_explores_roles_of_libraries_and_museums_in_an_era_of_participatory_culture.aspx

 

 

17 pages report in PDF available from IMLS:
Libraries and Museums in an Era of Participatory Culture

http://www.imls.gov/assets/1/AssetManager/SGS_Report_2012.pdf

 

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Collection development for law libraries — Slaw

Collection development for law libraries — Slaw | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Shaunna Mireau:

"I attended an excellent session on collection development for law libraries at the Canadian Association of Law Libraries Conference last week."

 

"Collection development symposium – audience suggestions:

- Continuous need for re-evaluating your collection, talking to your users and finding out their requirements.
- Resource sharing agreements and relationships. Look to work together with different library units. Divide up responsibility for different topics.
- Negotiate for the portion of the content you want (commentary/analysis).
- Work with the publishers on bundling of the electronic commentary on their sites with pricing and licensing that works for the users.
- Consortia and interlibrary loans.
- Visit vendor booths and give feedback. Request bound formats – talk to authors.
- Needs assessments – feedback from front-line librarians.
- Get your library community involved. Building of relationships and review of collection.
- Communicate and build trust with the vendors.
- Collaboration with other library communities.
- Collection usage statistics are key.
I- mplementing rotational cancellation of loose-leaf services."