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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Flipped Classrooms, Librarians as "Defenders of Wisdom," and the Hottest Tech Tools | ISTE 2013 - The Digital Shift

Flipped Classrooms, Librarians as "Defenders of Wisdom," and the Hottest Tech Tools | ISTE 2013 - The Digital Shift | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Flipped Classrooms, Librarians as "Defenders of Wisdom," and the Hottest Tech Tools | ISTE 2013 http://t.co/nznlMdZ8lw #iste13

 

By Tiffany Whitehead

The ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education) Conference in San Antonio from June 23-26 offered unique opportunities for educators to interact, learn about the latest ed tech resources, and hear new ideas from education leaders. At a conference this size, it is impossible to see and do it all, but here are the highlights that librarians can take back to their schools in the fall.

 

Feedback from:

- Opening Keynote

- SIGMS Digital Age Media Center Playground

- Your School Library: Flipped, Mobile, and Curated

- SIGMS Forum: School Librarians and Admins: A Powerful Name

- SIGMS keynote by John T. Spencer

- ISTE and SIGMS business


Karen du Toit's insight:

Interesting discussion especially for school librarians!

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marissa gibson's curator insight, February 17, 2014 1:12 PM

        8.     Many teachers were invited to a convetion for some of the newest techonology that would soon be presented in classrooms everywhere. There were nearpods, aurasmas, videolicious, puppet pals and mentor mob. These were all technology tools that kids could use and interact with.

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The Future of Libraries: Short on Books, Long on Tech

The Future of Libraries: Short on Books, Long on Tech | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
This isn't your childhood library. The Hunt Library at North Carolina State University is beautiful. The main floor looks more like a sleek Apple showroom than a stuffy library.
Karen du Toit's insight:
The library of the future!
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Social Networking - Technology marches on, and so do libraries| American Library Association

Social Networking - Technology marches on, and so do libraries| American Library Association | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The Social Networking section of the 2013 State of America’s Libraries Report from the American Library Association provides information about the use of Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and other Web 2.0 technologies in libraries..."

[...]

"The list of social networking sites is almost endless, bringing huge potential (and some headaches) to librarians nationwide. Will libraries continue to be able to keep up with the rapid— almost instantaneous—changes in technology and social networking?

The consensus is: Yes."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries keeping up with social media > American Library Association report!

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Technolust - the fifth column of the information counter-revolution

Hugh Rundle:

We are in an era of unprecedented change for libraries and the life of information. Bookstores throughout the western world are closing down. Libraries in the USA, UK and some in Australia are being defunded or closed. Many question the relevance of libraries, including some librarians. I am again surrounded by defeatists and the hopelessly optimistic. Many librarians appear to be searching for One Big Technology to save us. I believe that just like in Tasmania in the 1990s, this is a flawed search.

[...]

There are many other systems for sharing ideas. Why do we need libraries? What is our ‘unique value proposition’?

Libraries are a system for sharing ideas

in a way underpinned by the values of

PRESERVATION, OPENNESS, FREEDOM and PRIVACY.

This is our ‘Unique Value Proposition’.


Karen du Toit's insight:

The future of libraries lies in their unique value propositon! Good argument!

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Just-for-Me Training by Screencasting - American Libraries

Just-for-Me Training by Screencasting - American Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Meredith Farkas:
Librarians in all types of libraries provide training and instruction. Whether it's for staff or patrons, the timing of the training is usually critical.

 

"Even when we get the timing right, infrequent use of a tool on which people were trained will lead to forgetting. [...]

Screencasting software, technology that creates a video of activity on the computer screen along with the user’s narration, is sometimes used to solve this problem. The software allows a trainer to create videos that show specific processes within a web system so that users who have gone through a training can refresh their memory with a video later on."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The use of screencasting software such as Jing to enhance to learning process in libraries.

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3D Printing and Copyright | Maker Librarian

3D Printing and Copyright | Maker Librarian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Michael Weinberg, Vice President of the Institute for Emerging Innovation at PublicKnowledge.org, has just released a follow up to his influential 2010 whitepaper It Will Be Awesome if They Don’t Screw It Up: 3D Printing, Intellectual Property, and the Fight Over the Next Great Disruptive Technology.

What’s the Deal with Copyright and 3D Printing?  looks at developments over the last two years and examines issues of infringement in greater depth.

 

Link here: http://www.publicknowledge.org/Copyright-3DPrinting

Karen du Toit's insight:

Valuable whitepaper to consult!

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Library Strategies for New Generation Users: The 33rd Annual IATUL Conference by Leon F.H. Ma – New Asia College Ch’ien Mu Library, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Library Strategies for New Generation Users: The 33rd Annual IATUL Conference by  Leon F.H. Ma – New Asia College Ch’ien Mu Library, The Chinese University of Hong Kong | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Founded in 1955, the IATUL (International Association of Scientific and Technological University Libraries) is an international forum for the exchange of ideas on library matters related to technological universities around the ...
[...]
With an aim to develop new strategies and services to engage users more effectively in a multifaceted and rapidly changing information environment, the conference focused on the following three major areas:

Technology and innovations in libraries and their impact on learning, research and users.
Changes in learning, research and information needs and behaviour of users.
Trends, possibilities and scenarios for user-centred libraries.
One of the main themes of the conference this year was the application of social media in learning, teaching and research environment for new generation users.
In addition to a number of presentations on social networking applications, an interactive social media forum was held to share views from librarians, faculty members, students and social media professionals.

The 34th IATUL Conference will be held from April 14-18, 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa. Conference website: http://active.cput.ac.za/iatul2013/public/index.asp?pageid=640

Karen du Toit's insight:

Conference on technology and innovation in libraries

 

Conference papers here: http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/iatul/2012/papers/

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15 Internet Trends: The Magnitude of Upcoming Change will be Stunning - Getting Smart by Tom Vander Ark - How digital learning is changing the World

15 Internet Trends: The Magnitude of Upcoming Change will be Stunning - Getting Smart by Tom Vander Ark - How digital learning is changing the World | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Mary Meeker from leading venture capital investors Kleiner Perkins presented on internet trends at Stanford last week. It’s worth reviewing.

The money quote: “The magnitude of upcoming change will be stunning—we are still in spring training.” Meeker lists 15 trends in support of this claim:


Via Dennis T OConnor
Karen du Toit's insight:

the 15 Internet trends: 

Nearly ubiquitous high-speed wireless access in developed countriesUnprecedented global technology innovationUltra competitive markets for mobile operating systems + devicesBroadly accepted social +interest graphs/information transparencyFearless (& connected) entrepreneursDifficult ‘what do I have to lose’ economic environment for manyAvailable (& experienced capitalFearless (& connected) consumersInexpensive devices/access/services (apps)Ability to reach millions of new users in record (& accelerating) timeSocial emerging as starting distribution point for contentAggressive (& informed) ‘on my watch’ executives at ‘traditional companies’Unprecedented combo of focus on technology and designNearly ‘plug & play’ environment for entrepreneurs-marketplaces/web services/distributed work/innovation productivity tools/low startup costBeautiful/relevant/personalized/curated content for consumers

>>Valuable information for librarians!

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Teenagers, libraries, digital media, and learning | Reading, Writing, Research, by @dmguion

Teenagers, libraries, digital media, and learning | Reading, Writing, Research, by @dmguion | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries are beginning to design special spaces where teens paired with mentors use various digital media for learning and creativity.
Karen du Toit's insight:

"In November 2011, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, along with the Institute of Museum and Library Services, made grants of $100,000 to twelve museums and libraries across the country to develop digital learning laboratories for teenagers. They will announce another round of grants in November 2012.

Chicago Public Library’s YOUmedia

Chicago Public Library’s YOUmedia inspired the grant program. It is a special space where teenagers can use equipment provided by the library to create the same sorts of media that they consume. Creativity requires the development of certain skills.

Digital creativity, of course, requires digital skills. But creativity has always required a variety of intellectual, social, and emotional disciplines. The electronic age has not changed that fact at all.

It doesn’t work to plan a new program for a particular constituency and then dictate how it has to work. Development of YOUmedia has required some cultural adjustments. The YOUmedia space cannot enforce traditional library rules about food and noise levels and at the same time maintain a vibrant community of teenagers.

The entire concept of YOUmedia also requires access to and participation of the entire library to make it work. It is not a place for segregating either teenagers or their interests and learning style.

Sooner or later, the library will shape the teenagers’ behavior, but the teenagers will shape the library’s culture at least as much. That will result in short term discomfort and long term continued relevancy for the library as a whole.

Over the years, YOUmedia has started numerous separate projects. Some of them have continued for quite a while. The center has issued a literary magazine for a year and a half and a gaming podcast for three years. The longest-lasting programs have all come from the teenagers’ initiative, not from the library staff."

 

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From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge

From a deluge of data, e-science tools bring knowledge | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China. (...) - by Adrian Giordani, MyScienceWork blog, 27 november 2012


Via Julien Hering, PhD, Pavlinka Kovatcheva
Karen du Toit's insight:

"Today, many scientific fields can be described as data-intensive disciplines, which turn raw data into information and then knowledge. If this sounds familiar it’s because this represents the late and influential computer scientist Jim Gray’s vision of the fourth research paradigm. Gray divided up the evolution of science into four periods or paradigms. One thousand years ago, science was experimental in nature, a few hundred years ago it became theoretical, a few decades ago it moved to a computational discipline, and today it’s data driven. Researchers are reliant on e-science tools to enable collaboration, federation, analysis, and exploration to address this data deluge, equal to about 1.2 zettabytes each year. If 11 ounces of coffee equaled one gigabyte, a zettabyte would be the same volume as the Great Wall of China.

This article was originally published in International Science Grid This Week as “Enabling knowledge creation in data-driven science”
http://www.isgtw.org/feature/enabling-knowledge-creation-data-driven-science

[...]

 

"To answer this problem [of data deluge], some are creating infrastructures and software that are set to radically transform the way scientific publishing is done, which has been little changed for centuries.

Research publishing 2.0

While a number of scientific institutes, European Commission-funded projects, and research communities work on establishing common data policies and open-access infrastructures to make research data more searchable, shareable, and citable, the life sciences are looking at data analysis and publishing approaches that move the computer to the data rather than moving the data to the computers"

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The changing world of libraries | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project - SlideShare by Lee Rainie

"The changing world of libraries: Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, will discuss the Project’s latest research about how people use technology and how people use libraries. He will discuss the implications of this work for libraries."

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American Libraries Live | YouTube ivd about upcoming event: Library 2017: Tech at Warp Speed

American Libraries Live | YouTube ivd about upcoming event: Library 2017: Tech at Warp Speed | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Visit the new American Libraries Live!http://t.co/sHwmBX97 - Read Creating AL Live: http://t.co/AfqMEhXC #librarians #libraries...

 

Submitted by Dan Freeman:

"[...] the upcoming premier episode of AL Live, Library 2017 on 16 November: Tech at Warp Speed.

Jason Griffey is set to moderate the discussion with a panel of librarians and library industry experts. I had a chance to chat a bit with Jason about AL Live in general and the upcoming episode specifically. Check it out on YouTube: http://youtu.be/I6gal88rBww

 

"All you have to do to participate is come to this page at that time. We'll look forward to seeing you there!"

 

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The iPad Mini’s Meaning and Impact - on #libraries | Joe Murphy @LibraryFuture – Librarian, Innovator

The iPad Mini’s Meaning and Impact - on #libraries | Joe Murphy @LibraryFuture – Librarian, Innovator | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
How could it REALLY change libraries?“@libraryfuture: The iPad Mini’s meaning & impact on libraries http://t.co/sh54FFJN”...

 

"For Libraries:
With this smaller device, the reach of the Apple iOS and resources through it expands to more of our patrons (those preferring the smaller device size and smoother integration into their lives) and into more of their spaces. So be prepared for more iOS mobile engagement with your content and services.

For librarians’ use: the Mini may be better suited for mobile library staff: easier use with Square and mobile payments, more portable for roving reference, for checking out tablets to users."

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Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations - Pew Research

Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations - Pew Research | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Kathryn Zickuhr, Lee Rainie and Kristen Purcell:

"Americans ages 16-29 are heavy technology users, including in using computers and internet at libraries. At the same time, most still read and borrow printed books, and value a mix of traditional and technological library services.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interesting results!

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New Research Tools Kick Up Dust in Archives

New Research Tools Kick Up Dust in Archives | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Advances in technology have transformed the methods of historians and other archival researchers, a change that carries both benefits and consequences.

 

In just a few years, advances in technology have transformed the methods of historians and other archival researchers. Productivity has improved dramatically, costs have dropped and a world distinguished by solo practitioners has become collaborative. In response, developers are producing an array of computerized methods of analysis, creating a new quantitative science.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Technology greatly enhances research in archives, but also bring new challenges 

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The 12 Technologies Forever Changing School Libraries - Edudemic

The 12 Technologies Forever Changing School Libraries - Edudemic | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Ariana Stone:

We are in the midst of a major shift at school libraries thanks to technology innovation. Here are a dozen of those tech tools responsible.

1. INSTANT MESSAGING

2. MOBILE DEVICES

3. WYSIWYG TUTORIAL-MAKERS FOR LIBRARIANS

4. MATERIAL CROWD-SOURCING FOR RURAL SCHOOLS

5. CUSTOM APPS

6. SCREENCASTS

7. CLOUD-BASED STORAGE

8. PORTABLE ENERGY METERS

9. ITUNESU

10. E-READERS AND E-BOOKS

11. AVAILABILITY ALERTS

12. BETTER RESOURCES FOR DISTANCE LEARNERS

Karen du Toit's insight:

Technologies to use in school libraries! 

Also valuable to look at in academic or public libraries

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Technology in libraries improves access to the legal system

By Russ Van Arsdale, Executive Director, Northeast CONTACT 

Patrons of Maine’s public libraries will soon have a chance to hear from experts on a number of legal issues at no charge. Low income people may be able to confer one-on-one with those experts, again at no cost.

The reason is what’s becoming known as “Lawyers In Libraries.” It’s an outreach effort coordinated by the Volunteer Lawyers Project, or VLP. A grant allows VLP to arrange clinics by video conference; a lawyer speaks in real time at one location while people at libraries across the state watch and listen. After the lawyer’s presentation, viewers can ask general questions about the law, although the lawyer cannot serve as a questioner’s legal representative.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Lawyers in Libraries! - Free expert help!