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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Online Video Presentation: NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural HeritageNEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage | National Endowment for the Huma...

Online Video Presentation: NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural HeritageNEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage | National Endowment for the Huma... | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities is proud to present “NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage,” an online video by Program Officers Joshua Sternfeld and Jesse Johnston: http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/featured-project/neh-and-the-preservation-and-access-audiovisual-cultural-her. ;

The three-part video—which you may watch in full or in separate parts (links below)--covers NEH’s ongoing commitment to preserve audiovisual cultural heritage.  Part I provides an argument for the significance of a/v collections as an essential media for understanding the history of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  Part II summarizes the full range of grant programming for a/v collections provided by NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access that covers areas in research and development, education and training, assessment for smaller institutions, reformatting, cataloging, and stabilization through sustainable preventive conservation.  Finally, Part III describes NEH’s strategic planning to address the current crisis in a/v preservation and access.

We invite you to share the video or its constituent parts widely not just with fellow audiovisual archivists, librarians, and engineers, but administrators, scholars, and anyone else who may be interested to learn more about moving image and sound collections. 

We also invite your feedback on how NEH may continue to support the field going forward.  Your participation, expressed in grant proposals and correspondence, are what fuel our programming and outreach.

As always, program officers are available to discuss project ideas, read drafts for many of our grant programs, and provide feedback.  Questions may be submitted to Josh Sternfeld (jsternfeld@neh.gov) or Jesse Johnston (jjohnston@neh.gov).  You may learn more about our grant programming at http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation. ; You can also follow us on Twitter, @NEH_PresAccess for future news and announcements on this fast-moving front.

 

NEH is an independent grant-making agency of the United States government dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation, and public programs in the humanities.

 

FULL VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFTk6OLctVI&feature=player_embedded

 

PART I: The Significance of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TjWQFOcaGo&feature=player_embedded

 

PART II: NEH Division of Preservation and Access Grant Programming and Audiovisual Collections: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugcaJpcAktg&feature=player_embedded

 

PART III: NEH Strategic Planning and the Crisis of Audiovisual Preservation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyfXXfgxEQY&feature=player_embedded

rn more about moving image and sound collections. 

 

 

We also invite your feedback on how NEH may continue to support the field going forward.  Your participation, expressed in grant proposals and correspondence, are what fuel our programming and outreach.

 

As always, program officers are available to discuss project ideas, read drafts for many of our grant programs, and provide feedback.  Questions may be submitted to Josh Sternfeld (jsternfeld@neh.gov) or Jesse Johnston (jjohnston@neh.gov).  You may learn more about our grant programming at http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation. ; You can also follow us on Twitter, @NEH_PresAccess for future news and announcements on this fast-moving front.

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

To be shared widely, and encourage feedback as well!

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More public libraries, their relevance at stake, see helping homeless people as a core mission

More public libraries, their relevance at stake, see helping homeless people as a core mission | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Article by: TRAVIS LOLLER , Associated Press 

libraries are more important than ever to people who can't otherwise get connected: Nearly two-thirds provide the only free computer and Internet access in their communities, according to the American Library Association.

In the 25 years since the ALA adopted a policy urging full access for poor and homeless library patrons, few have taken this mission as far as Nashville's main downtown library, where Bailey arrives early each day, standing on an icy sidewalk in below-freezing temperatures with a half-dozen other people until the ornate bronze doors open.

Once inside, he goes directly to the third floor, where rows of computer terminals are quickly occupied by people carrying bags filled with their worldly possessions.

The library recently renovated this section with their homeless patrons in mind, ditching countless shelves of bound copies of "Popular Mechanics" and other periodicals that are now available electronically, and making way for 68 computers and more tables with ethernet connections and power outlets."


...

 

"Librarians can't solve people's problems, but we can provide them the resources to solve their own problems," she said.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Library empowering people!

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Building libraries of the distant future today, Drew Brookhart - Columbus Telegram

Building libraries of the distant future today, Drew Brookhart - Columbus Telegram | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
It is exciting to feel energy build around a library and cultural arts center in downtown Columbus. The Columbus City Council has had their support galvanized by grant money coming

 

"So when you think of a library in 100, 300, or 500 years, imagine a beautiful building with spaces for discussion, contemplation and creation where wisdom can be shared. Imagine skilled librarians making sure that everyone has access to organized, meaningful resources that raise the level of public discussion above the din of the internet. Imagine all that topped off with a collection of the best hardbacks available."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Contemplative article about the "future Library"!

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Thirsty? Go to a library, not a coffee shop - Telegraph.co.uk

Thirsty? Go to a library, not a coffee shop - Telegraph.co.uk | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries should be re-branded as vibrant community hubs offering free wifi, comfy sofas and coffee, according to government-commissioned report The recommendations are made in the Independent Library Report for England, commissioned by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport earlier this year.
Karen du Toit's insight:
"Vibrant community hubs!"
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Olga Kudriavtseva 's curator insight, December 19, 2014 2:38 AM

Эпоха библиотек как молчаливых читальных залов с книгами в качестве единственного продукта закончилась, и для того, чтобы выжить, они должны стать "живыми и привлекательными эпицентрами деятельности общества».



RuthEastham's curator insight, December 22, 2014 8:46 AM

...ibraries ........must become “vibrant and attractive community hubs”

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Librarian Publishers May Be More Important Than You Think, by Phill Jones - Part 1

Librarian Publishers May Be More Important Than You Think, by Phill Jones  - Part 1 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Librarians have been acting in a limited way as publishers since well before the internet, but over the last 5 years or so, a revitalized librarian-publisher movement has emerged. 

....

the second edition of the Library Publishing Directory (2015), edited by Sarah Lippincott, tells a very different story. The directory is a non-exhaustive collection of 124 case studies of library publishing programs (111 based inside the US and Canada). According to Lippincott’s analysis, around 90% of library publishers work in collaboration with academic departments and faculty on campus, drawing on in-house expertise to form editorial and review boards. In return, the library supports research from their own institutions by providing an avenue for publication, particularly in niche research areas. While many library publishers (68%) also work with student journals such as university law reviews, the perception that library publishers ‘mostly publish student research’ isn’t backed up by the numbers."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Librarians as publishers!

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How Libraries are Advancing and Inspiring Schools and Communities - KQED (blog)

How Libraries are Advancing and Inspiring Schools and Communities - KQED (blog) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries are experimenting with some exciting ways to inspire and engage the community by creating meeting and maker spaces with old technology and new

 

"...

a report just released by the Aspen Institute Dialogue on Public Libraries asks us again to reconsider how the library can serve communities in the 21st century. “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries” aims to “capture the momentum and excitement of the innovations taking place in public libraries across the country, and the impact these are having on communities,” said the group’s director, Amy Garmer. The report asks: With all the new technology and layered networks, what can be done beyond current advancements?

“We are a place for the curious, for creativity, a place for learning, a place to experiment. It’s always been the mission of the library. We’re just using different tools.”

The Dialogue on Public Libraries group is supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Libraries Program and is made up of 34 library field leaders, business executives, government officials, education experts and community development visionaries. The group aims for more than just holding up great examples of libraries working well in the digital age.

“We want to provide a catalyst for new thinking about libraries as platforms for learning, creativity and innovation in their communities, and the creation of new networked forms of libraries,” Garmer said. If the report could spark engagement at the local, state and national levels to rethink how to use libraries and then constructively act on it, Garmer said, then the group’s goal will have been achieved."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great end-of-year question regenerate services for next year!

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The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries - Times of San Diego

The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries - Times of San Diego | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Peter C. Herman"For the past few years, both the California State University and the University of California libraries have been experimenting with packages that replace paper books with e-books. The advantages are obvious. With e-books, you no longer have to schlep to a library to take out a book. You just log on from whatever device connects you to the web, at whatever time and in whatever state of dress, and voila! the book appears on your screen.

But the real attraction is price. Library budgets, along with university budgets, have been slashed, and such companies as Pearson and Elsevier offer e-book packages that make it possible to gain access (I’ll explain the awkward syntax in a moment) to lots of books at what seems like a minimal cost. The savings are multiplied when the package serves the entire system. So instead of each campus buying a paper book, all 23 CSU’s, for instance, share a single e-book. That’s the theory, at least. The reality is very different."

 

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"Instead, a library pays to access a data file by one of two routes: “PDA,” or “Patron-Driven Acquisition,” in which a vendor makes available a variety of e-books, and a certain number of “uses” (the definition varies) triggers a purchase, or a subscription to an e-library that does not involve any mechanism for buying the e-book. Both avenues come loaded with all sorts of problems.

First, reading an e-book is a different, and lesser, experience that reading a paper book, just aswatching a movie at home differs from watching one in a theatre.

There’s a huge difference between casual and college reading, and recent studies prove beyond doubt that while e-books are perfectly fine for the latest John Grisham or Fifty Shades of Grey, they actively discourage intense reading and deep learning."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The impact of e-books on libraries and learning. Not good!

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BOOKTRYST: The Shocking Hard-Boiled World Of Librarians! - book covers used as parodies

BOOKTRYST: The Shocking Hard-Boiled World Of Librarians! - book covers used as parodies | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"All images courtesy of Professional Library Literature with special thanks to the anonymous creator of these brilliant book parodies, who, I suspect, may be in fear of losing their job if outed. Additional thanks to B.T. Carver of LISNews for drawing our attention to this delightful webpage. There are more of the same on the site."

Karen du Toit's insight:

All librarians can identify with at least one of these!

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10 Must-Read Books about Libraries & Librarians, by Simon McDonald

10 Must-Read Books about Libraries & Librarians, by Simon McDonald | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Simon McDonald, Editorial Manager | simon@thereadingroom.com

"In the words of Jamie Ford in his novel The Songs of Willow Frost, libraries are “like a candy store where everything is free.” These 10 books will remind you of why libraries are such special places."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great list!

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Free Twitter Analytics - what can libraries and archives get out of it? - Ned Potter

Free Twitter Analytics - what can libraries and archives get out of it? - Ned Potter | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Twitter stats packages are sort of fascinating but also not. I look at a fair few because I need to be able to talk about them in social media workshops: what tends to happen is I put my username in, go 'ooooh that's interesting!' a few times, but then never actually go back and check the analysis on a second occasion.

As individuals we don't really need Twitter stats apps (unless you take Twitter very seriously) but as organisations they can be genuinely useful. They can help us understand our network, show us what works (so we can build on it) and what doesn't (so we can phase it out).

For an analysis package to be useful to an organisation it really needs three qualities:

1. It must give you information you can ACT on. There are a million
stats apps out there, but if they don't tell you anything which you
can use to inform better practice for your twitter account, then they
don't really have any value.
2. It must NOT tweet things about that information on your behalf. Someapps tell you useful things - but they tell the rest of the world
those useful things too. I'm dubious about this at the best of times
(for me an auto-tweet saying "This week on Twitter: X follows /
unfollows, Y ReTweets and Z total reach!" either looks a bit awkward if X, Y and Z are small numbers, and a bit show-boaty if they're large) but I really don't think organisational accounts should have anything tweeted on their behalf.
3. It ideally needs to be free. Some things are worth paying for but
realistically it's hard to get the people who control the
purse-strings in libraries to shell-out for a Twitter stats annual
subscription...

Thankfully the official Twitter Analytics, newly available for all, meets all three of those criteria. If you just tweet as yourself, sign in to analytics.twitter.com and have a look a round at the things worth noting; it's interesting to see how few of your followers actually see your tweets, for example."


Karen du Toit's insight:

Great guide to make the most of your Twitter Analytics for your library or archive!

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Karen du Toit's curator insight, September 4, 2014 3:43 AM

Great guide! Also for any corporate account!

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Libraries and Kindle Unlimited, by Jill O'Neill | The Scholarly Kitchen

Libraries and Kindle Unlimited, by Jill O'Neill | The Scholarly Kitchen | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"In the wake of Amazon’s announcement of a new ebook subscription service, Forbes published an article by a British think tank employee with the link-bait title of “Close the Libraries and Buy Everyone An Amazon Kindle Unlimited Subscription”. As you might gather, the idea put forth was that supporting this licensing approach might be more cost effective for enabling the public’s access to content than the traditional public library in the United Kingdom. While that might not be the greatest idea, there is still much that scholarly publishers can learn from Amazon’s business strategy.

As a historical footnote, subscription based libraries were big in Britain during the 18th and 19th century when reasonably affluent individuals might pay for access to the latest three volume novel. (For some historical background on subscription based lending libraries, see here and here respectively). In the context of the Kindle Unlimited subscription, the reader pays Amazon $120 per year (or $119.88, if we’re being sticklers for accuracy) and gains access to as much as they want from a collection of about 600,000 titles. Critics have noted that these are not the high-end titles found in a first rate public or academic library; Amazon’s offering doesn’t include best-sellers, textbooks or scholarly monographs."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The controversial debate about the future of libraries vs subscription based ebook services. 

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Transmedia Storytelling for Social Impact, y Dr Pamela Rutledge.

 

 


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great to take note of in libraries/archives as well! Can;t just use single platforms!

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, August 14, 2014 2:23 AM


An excellent presentation from Dr. Pamela Rutledge.

Kajsa Hartig's curator insight, August 14, 2014 2:39 AM

Transmedia Storytelling - for the public good.

Jerri Lynn Hogg's curator insight, August 14, 2014 5:40 PM
Great presentation!
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The case for making libraries full of toys and games

The case for making libraries full of toys and games | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
American businessman and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie’s public library legacy was built on a boyhood dream: to acquire knowledge. Carnegie believed in “the meritocratic nature of America,” that anyone “with the right inclination and desire could educate himself” and therefore succeed, and that libraries should contribute directly to that. 

So what are libraries doing lending out toys and holding game nights? Aren’t American kids’ test scores lagging behind those of pretty much the rest of the world? Shouldn’t American public libraries be, as Carnegie wanted, educating? Recent studies, and librarians themselves, say otherwise.

In a study with 70 six-year olds, psychologists at the University of Colorado found that the children who engaged in more free play had a “more highly developed self-directed executive function” than those who had spent more time in “structured activities,” that were adult-led rather than child-initiated."


Via nickcarman
Karen du Toit's insight:

The importance of play in the development of children! Definitely should be addressed by libraries!

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nickcarman's curator insight, August 12, 2014 1:00 AM

This is an interesting article with lots of useful links.

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South African boost for Gandhian digital archive project - Daily News & Analysis

South African boost for Gandhian digital archive project - Daily News & Analysis | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"An MoU has been signed here between India and South Africa for digital images of the copies of 'Indian Opinion', a newspaper established by Mahatma Gandhi, to provide an authentic open source archive on the iconic leader's life and times."


"Gandhi's public life began in South Africa and no archive or assessment of his contribution could ever be complete without a comprehensive view on his South African years. No library or archive in India, including the National Archives in New Delhi or the National Library at Kolkata have a complete, unbroken set of 'Indian Opinion'. The signing of the MOU will boost the plans of the GHP in its inaugural phase to have about five hundred thousand pages of material related to Gandhi." 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great initiative!

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Librarians prevalent in use of social media - Analysis & News - Research Information

Librarians prevalent in use of social media - Analysis & News - Research Information | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Jodie Bell of Taylor & Francis asks: how important is social media as a communication tool?

Research Information: February/March 2015

A social media white paper

Taylor & Francis sought to address some of these questions by conducting research into how the library community is currently using and applying social media. Libraries have been particularly prevalent in their uptake of social media, and use it as a key medium for engaging with their users. As such, it is an issue close to the heart of how libraries are evolving and Taylor & Francis wanted to help benchmark current use and provide best practice recommendations to help navigate what the future may bring.

The research conducted was on a global scale – more than 600 librarians worldwide contributed their thoughts, suggestions and experiences through focus groups, telephone interviews, an online survey and a Twitter party. All the research was then compiled into a white paper, which has now been published online and is available to download for free.

 

The white paper can be accessed online for free, along with accompanying top level data, infographic visualisations of key findings, video presentations and more. See http://bit.ly/socialmediatf for more details.


Karen du Toit's insight:

Interesting read!

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