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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Watch as public libraries reinvent themselves yet again, by Julie-Anne Cardellais

Watch as public libraries reinvent themselves yet again, by Julie-Anne Cardellais | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Amid ever-evolving trends in technology, the question has come to me: Is there a future for the public library? And if so, what will that library look like?

 

"The need to access information will only escalate and methods for interacting with the information will continue to evolve. Traditional library resources, dare I say print, are becoming more and more a medium of the past. The challenge for libraries – and librarians – is how (and in what format) to access and acquire information that can eventually be directed and channelled to its users.

The library of the future may not be the physical storehouse it was in the past, but it can remain the vehicle for accessing information. It can still be that powerful entity around which communities rally, and which gives credence to the concept of social hub or even community hub.

And so, I remain confident that its future is bright, engaged and vital, enhancing all aspects of community life.

Julie-Anne Cardellais a professional librarian, the director of the Westmount Public Library and past president of l’Association des bibliothécaires du Québec/Quebec Library Association."

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Watch+public+libraries+reinvent+themselves+again/6844165/story.html#ixzz1zdBnoSYz

 

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Cataloging Then, Now, and Tomorrow - American Libraries

Cataloging Then, Now, and Tomorrow - American Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Elise (Yi-Ling) Wong:

"There’s no question that the art of cataloging and the role of its practitioners are evolving. Where specialization is preferred, catalogers remain steadfastly the guardians of library catalogs to ensure their accuracy, currency, comprehensiveness, and user-friendliness. But catalogers are also mediators between libraries and other information organizations (e.g., museums and archives), as they are charged with understanding the interoperability between the MARC standard and the different non-MARC metadata systems.

The notion of catalogers “just” being catalogers is gradually being replaced by a philosophy that all library staff be cross-trained and have hands-on experience working directly with library users. At SMCL, all librarians (including catalogers) take at least one reference shift. In collection development, we are subject selectors allocated funds to purchase materials in our subject areas. In addition, selectors are responsible for maintaining their subject pages on the library website. In library instruction sessions, we collaborate with faculty members in their teaching and research."

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Perspectives on SAOIM 2012, via SAOUG

Perspectives on SAOIM 2012, via SAOUG | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The Southern African Online Information Meeting with the theme: "Innovation in an Age of Limits"

 

By Phillipa Mitchell

"The SAOIM conference 2012 was a wonderful place for someone on the other end of the book spectrum – that of bookselling as opposed to being a librarian – to immerse themselves."

 

More chronicles here: http://saoug.org.za/category/saoim2012/

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RB 200: The Library Of The Future | Berkman Center - podcast

RB 200: The Library Of The Future | Berkman Center - podcast | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @trisaratop: Berkman Center for Internet & Society talks about the Future of Libraries (audio available): http://t.co/UrdYsybD...

 

"The technological advancements of the past twenty years have rendered the future of the library as a physical space, at least, as uncertain as it has ever been. The information that libraries were once built to house in the form of books and manuscripts can now be accessed in the purely digital realm, as evidenced by initiatives like the Digital Public Library of America, which convenes for the second time this Friday in San Francisco. But libraries still have profound cultural significance, indicating that even if they are no longer necessary for storing books they will continue to exist in some altered form. Radio Berkman host David Weinberger postulated in his book Too Big To Know that the book itself is no longer an appropriate knowledge container – it has been supplanted by the sprawling knowledge networks of the internet. The book’s subtitle is "Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren't the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room." Inspired by the work of Harvard Graduate School of Design students in Biblioteca 2: Library Test Kitchen – who spent the semester inventing and building library innovations ranging from nap carrels to curated collections displayed on book trucks to digital welcome mats – we turned the microphone around and had library expert Matthew Battles ask David, "When the smartest person in the room is the room, how do we design the room?" Matthew Battles is the Managing Editor and Curatorial Practice Fellow at the Harvard metaLAB. He wrote Library: an Unquiet History and a biography of Harvard’s Widener Library."

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Librarians Learn to Move beyond Text | American Libraries Magazine

Librarians Learn to Move beyond Text | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Submitted by George Eberhart on Tue, 06/26/2012 - 13:50


By Sara Zettervall, Cognotes
“When we’re looking for ourselves in kids, we don’t always see what we expect to see.” That statement from Stephen Abram, library futurist, was the takeaway lesson at the ALSC/YALSA Joint President’s Program on Monday.

Michelle Poris, quant savant at the market research and strategic consulting firm Smarty Pants, revealed that, of several hundred young people who participated in her study on digital activity, 68% agreed that “grownups need to do a better job of finding out what’s important to kids.” She particularly wanted librarians to be aware that 50%–60% of young teens feel stress daily, as they face pressure to juggle multiple tasks even as they’re prompted to begin preparing for college in middle school. They see this message online as well as hear it in school, and their stress is compounded by packed schedules in which homework and organized sports crowd out relaxation time."

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Library Intelligencer » Futures Thinking for Academic Librarians ...

Shirley (http://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/libraryintelligencer/author/shirley/)

 

"As e-books and the emerging digital library occupy today’s headlines, there appears to be a tacit consensus emerging from the discourse among academics, journalists, and librarians about the future of the book. That vision of the future, as portrayed in the trade literature and popular press, consigns this centuries-old technology to obsolescence, as if it were merely another information format.
This report explores alternative scenarios, where the technology of the printed book does not disappear or become extinct, but occupies a different position in a technological ecology characterized by the proliferation of e-books and digital libraries. The printed book has for centuries been the chief cognitive object of the library. The future status of that object should be of interest to all librarians, especially as they plan for the future; therefore, this report intentionally favors the continued existence of the printed book as a viable technology."

 

Document here: http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/issues/value/scenarios2012.pdf

 

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Geek of the Week: Craig Simmons on the future of libraries in the digital age

Geek of the Week: Craig Simmons on the future of libraries in the digital age | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Todd Bishop:

"Craig Simmons, our latest Geek of the Week, didn’t originally plan to pursue a career in technology. Back in the 1990s, he was studying for his PhD, focusing on 18th Century and Early Modern British literature, when he realized that something needed to be done to make the rare books and manuscripts he was working with more widely accessible.
So he taught himself programming and early web development, and he’s been involved in technology ever since. Today he manages more than 100 members of the technology team at Serials Solutions, a company in Seattle that works to bring libraries into the digital age."

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Digitization 101: Is now the time for librarians?

Digitization 101: Is now the time for librarians? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Jill Hurst-Wahl:

New librarians are entering the job market fresh from receiving their master's degree (MLIS). The months and years spent in the classroom are behind them and they are anxious for the next chapter of their lives to begin.

 

[...]This is the time for librarians!"


Via nickcarman
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