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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Librarians of the future: Lis Pardi at TEDxSomerville

"Published on 24 May 2012

As the sale of eBook readers rise many people assume the library is dying -- that it has no place in our device obsessed future world. But librarians are re-inventing what a library is and sometimes removing it from the big building full of books. Future libraries will be portable and located where researchers need them. Traditional library buildings will house new items for check out, like tools, cake pans or even people.

Lis is a strong advocate for libraries and has spoken at local events about the ways libraries will remain relevant in a paper-less future. She earned her MS in Library and Information Science from Simmons College in 2010 and now works for EBSCO Publishing, a provider of online databases for libraries, as a usability researcher and user interface analyst."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries of the future!

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Rubbish, Tech, Makerspace, Hackerspace: Maker culture has arrived in Danish libraries

Rubbish, Tech, Makerspace, Hackerspace: Maker culture has arrived in Danish libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Louise OvergaardTeam leader, Aarhus Main Library

"Euro pallets packed to the rim with used go-cart tires, defunct computer components, washing machine drums and ancient electric domestic devices – not to mention chipped tableware and vases – this is what awaits visitors entering the Main Library of Aarhus.

Some of the visitors don’t seem to register this atypical library deposit, a few are offended, but most are curious and want to explore the space. Some visitors take up painting old porcelain, converting empty beer cans into candlesticks, or sewing pencil cases from tattered banners. Others, more daringly, set to work dissecting devices with hammers and electric drills, reassembling the refuse into their own inventions and designs.

This is Skrotlab!, or Wastelab! to use its English name. October 2013 was all about waste materials, sustainability, and recycling. Users, along with library staff, got busy repairing, recreating, modifying, and developing the rubbish. There were also lectures, waste dates, repair cafès, basketweaving workshops, ethnographic workshops, and a variety of other maker-cultural activities."


Via Doug Mirams
Karen du Toit's insight:

Future libraries!

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Doug Mirams's curator insight, January 20, 2014 9:33 AM

Last October, upcycling came to the Aarhus Main Library with its Wastelab, or Skrotlab!
via @myleejoseph

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Google Glass: Try Before You Buy Technology at the library (Arapahoe Library District)

Google Glass: Try Before You Buy Technology at the library (Arapahoe Library District) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Michelle Cingrani 

 

"The Arapahoe (Colorado) Library District (ALD) is making difficult-to-access technology available for patrons – like Google Glass, 3D printing, and The Studio, which is a state-of-the-art soundproof library space featuring a green screen and everything needed to create a masterpiece – including iMacs with Adobe Creative Cloud, iMovie, GarageBand, high-definition video cameras, a guitar, a keyboard, and more.  

“ALD is redefining libraries as warehouses of information to evolving centers where patrons can experience and use cutting-edge technology,” said ALD Executive Director Nicolle Davies. “Libraries are portals to the latest information – and offering access to technology is the newest version of that role.”

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future libraries!

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A New Year’s Vision of Libraries as Bookstores - Jamie Larue discussion | American Libraries Magazine

A New Year’s Vision of Libraries as Bookstores - Jamie Larue discussion | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
@ALALibrary asks whether libraries can and/or will make the transition to becoming ebook-sellers. Thoughts? http://t.co/IBMb0KxPew

 

"Beth Bacon, vice president of content management at Seattle publishing platform Booktrope, posted a piece December 30, 2013, on the idea of libraries as ebookstores. On the surface, there is much to commend it. Many bookstores have closed, and the more than 15,000 public libraries in the United States—more, ALA tells us (PDF file), than there are McDonald's in the country—would seem to provide a nationwide network of distribution, already established, already trusted."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Jamie Larue asks about the potential benefits and pitfalls to the library?

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What to expect from libraries in the 21st century: Pam Sandlian Smith at TEDxMileHigh - YouTube

"Why do we still need libraries in the age of digital, real-time information? In this emotional talk, Pam Sandlian Smith shows how she works to use the library as a hub for community-based knowledge creation and discourse."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great talk about the relevance of libraries!

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The future of libraries: what the Guardian online debate found

The future of libraries: what the Guardian online debate found | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Ian Anstice:

"The Guardian held one of its online debates on libraries today. The discussion between several library experts (managers, campaigners, councillors) and anyone contributing online. Around 200 comments were made so it’s a little condfusing: I’ve endeavoured to summarise below, although doubtless I have missed some things which some would consider important. Main threads and arguments.

Are libraries declining due to technological change? Libraries are still needed, in some ways more than ever: internet/online access essential and libraries provide the access and skills to those without either or both. Seven million have never used the internet. Wikipedia etc don’t cover all information and are prone to deletion, accidental or otherwise and is also not entirely trustworthy anyway.  Libraries provide quiet study spaces.  Children need the books and everyone needs serendipity that bookshelves allow.  Bookstock is declining due to budget cuts.  It’s not black and white – books and e-books will co-exist. Books are still in demand with 244 million loans in England 2011/12,

Read more: http://www.publiclibrariesnews.com/2013/11/the-future-of-libraries-what-the-guardian-online-debate-found.html

Karen du Toit's insight:

Main threads and arguments in the discussions! Interesting!

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Alexina's curator insight, November 30, 2013 8:00 PM

This is a short summary of an extensive online discussion about public libraries in the UK, but much of the discussion applies to USA libraries too. I like libraries referred to as "Idea stores".

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The Changing Landscape For Libraries & Librarians In The Digital Age

The Changing Landscape For Libraries & Librarians In The Digital Age | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

[...] "the ALA supports the following 4 primary dimensions for strategic library development:

Physical To Virtual Libraries – Creating a balance between physical facilities with the increasing demand for digital materials

Individual To Community Libraries – Accommodating the needs of individuals in concert with community engagement

Collection To Creation Libraries – Transforming libraries into facilities for media creation, not just consumption

Portal To Archive Libraries – Balancing the needs for physical and digital archives"

Karen du Toit's insight:

The need for libraries in the digital age!

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FLIP THE MODEL: Strategies for Creating and Delivering Value in Libraries, by Brian Mathews

FLIP THE MODEL: Strategies for Creating and Delivering Value in Libraries, by Brian Mathews | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Abstract:Academic libraries are encountering a critical inflection point. In our case it isn’t a single technology that is disrupting our established system, but a barrage of advancements in publishing, pedagogy, and user preferences. The landscape is shifting around us, and the future of scholarship requires us to develop new skills, design new environments, and deliver new service capacities. In short, we need new operating models. Full item record: http://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/handle/10919/23927?show=fullFlip the Model final draft: http://vtechworks.lib.vt.edu/bitstream/handle/10919/23927/Flip_The_Model_Final_Draft_Oct2013.pdf?sequence=1 
Karen du Toit's insight:

New operating models for libraries needed! 

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The Deep Mission of Public Libraries

The Deep Mission of Public Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Why do we have public libraries? Many of today's librarians like to talk about themselves as "information brokers" or "knowledge facilitators."  

We talk about our skill in finding and organizing information.  And sure, we’ve got those skills.

But what we really do is support literacy.  This is our deeper mission.

[...]

 

Our patrons need help with every level of technology literacy.  From those who come in who don’t know how to use a mouse, to those who’re interested in building a computer from scratch, the library could provide a wide range of resources for a wide diversity of people.  We can help our community to practice and perfect our skill in understanding, using, and appreciating technology and digital content.

We’re kind-of getting there.  We’ve got computers and the free internet for our patrons.  We’re doing some classes and programs to help people develop their skills.  And then of course we’ve got the maker movement.

It is in this context, of expanded literacy, that the maker fad starts to become something more important.  Maker Spaces are totally hot right now.  Everybody wants a 3D printer.

We’re in a bubble of bandwagonism.  But after this settles down, I think we’ll be in a better place.  It will be more accepted to support digital literacy, from helping patrons understand where the url bar is to helping patrons understand how to build an app, wire a circuit, or repair their PC.  We won’t be so rabid about it, but we’ll have the foundations in place to really get down to work."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future of the public library! 

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Two Writers and their thoughts about the Future of Libraries | David Lee King

Two Writers and their thoughts about the Future of Libraries | David Lee King | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

People love to talk about the future of libraries. 

 

Here are two pretty different viewpoints:

1. MG Siegler and TechCrunch:

A couple days ago, TechCrunch publishedThe End of the Library, written by MG Siegler. In it, Mr. Siegler says this:

“it’s hard not to imagine a future where the majority of libraries cease to exist — at least as we currently know them.

2. Neil Gaiman, well-known writer:

Around the same time, Neil Gaiman wrote Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming in the Guardian. In his article, Neil says this about libraries:

“But libraries are about freedom. Freedom to read, freedom of ideas, freedom of communication. They are about education (which is not a process that finishes the day we leave school or university), about entertainment, about making safe spaces, and about access to information.


Karen du Toit's insight:

The future of libraries! What are your thoughts? 

I support no 2!

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The global rise of the super library

The global rise of the super library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Biblioteca Vasconcelos, Seattle Central, Kanazawa Umimirai, Spijkenisse and Birmingham super-libraries explored (Crack open the Borges. Five non-imaginary libraries to ignite flights of fancy.) As the £189m Library of Birmingham opens its doors, it joins a new breed of international "super library". Architecture, design and technology are changing the way the library functions as a space. They have evolved to reflect modern attitudes to books, and how people consume the written word. With The Culture Show architecture critic Tom Dyckhoff, BBC Arts explores five of the world's most impressive public libraries.
Karen du Toit's insight:
5 Super Libraries!
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KrisPaterson's curator insight, September 8, 2013 1:24 AM

Some beautiful and inspiring spaces to read, meet and connect. What great books will be written inside these spaces, I wonder?

nickcarman's curator insight, September 9, 2013 12:43 AM

A brief review of super libraries around the world in the wake of the opening of the library of Birmingham.

wildswans's curator insight, September 17, 2013 10:34 PM

Absolutely love the "book hill". What fasinates me is how relationships between the outside space and inside space is interpreted. A book opens up a whole new world - therefore the inside is bigger than the ouside. And perhaps, interior physical spaces should also create that kind of expansive feeling, which draws people in.

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Collection Bashing & Trashing | Michael Stephens - Office Hours

Collection Bashing & Trashing | Michael Stephens - Office Hours | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"A few months ago in “Holding Us Back” (LJ 4/15/13, p. 42), I suggested that one of the things preventing librarians from working at web scale might be “a lingering emphasis on collections over users.” I and others have argued that the evolution of libraries and library service will include a pronounced shift from libraries as book warehouses to libraries as centers for discovery, learning, and creation via any number of platforms.

I might have been guilty of a bit of collection bashing in these discussions, and recent occurrences of collection trashing have given me pause. I still see the path forward detailed above as viable and inevitable, but we must also not forget that stewardship must not be sacrificed for a 3-D printer or a wall of monitors highlighting a digital collection.

LEARNING FROM #BOOKGATE

I followed with great interest the weeding kerfuffle now known as #bookgate at the Urbana Free Library(UFL) in Illinois. Tweets, news stories, and Facebook shares painted a grim picture of a weeding project gone horribly wrong. In a nutshell: books more than ten years old were removed from the nonfiction collection without reference to any other criteria..."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Some thoughts on collections in a New Librarianship paradigm!

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Practicing Freedom in the Digital Library | Reinventing Libraries

Practicing Freedom in the Digital Library | Reinventing Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Barbara Fister:

"It’s an era of [information] abundance, but it has a downside. Libraries are now beholden to corporations that do not necessarily share our values. We can’t preserve what we don’t own; we can’t fight censorship when someone else controls the switches. Privacy—well, that’s over, or so we are told. We can’t always afford increases in the rent, and publishers have spats with vendors, so access to content shifts and dwindles."

[...]

"Thinking about the digital shift in libraries and the many invisible ways this shift has challenged our values, I’ve reflected on that statement a faculty member made all those years ago and made a few additions.

It’s not about technology. It’s about making meaning.It’s not about finding sources. It’s about building understanding.It’s not about skills. It’s about identity and relationships.It’s not about individual success. It’s about participating in a society that values justice.It’s not about finding and using information. It’s about the practice of freedom."
Karen du Toit's insight:

The digital shift in libraries: How it is impacting! 

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American Libraries Live - The Future of Libraries - What's your vision?

"The Future of Libraries: What's Your Vision? We're thrilled to have Innovative Interfaces as a sponsor for this episode. David Lee King will lead our expert panel in an open discussion on the challenges and changes we'll see in our libraries in the near and distant future.

Panelists:
David Lee King, Digital Services Director at Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library
Bohyun Kim, Digital Access Librarian at Florida International University Medical Library
Marshall Breeding, Library Technology Consultant, Speaker and Author
Joe Murphy, Director of Library Futures at Innovative Interfaces"

Karen du Toit's insight:

Youtube video of the discussion online. 

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toraki's curator insight, January 31, 2014 4:11 AM

Ενδιαφέουσα συζήτηση για το μέλλον των βιβλιοθηκών.

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Libraries become tech hubs - Waterbury Republican American

Libraries become tech hubs - Waterbury Republican American | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Katie Humphrey Minneapolis Star Tribune:

[...] libraries have quietly become community tech hubs where the digital tools go far beyond computer terminals with free Internet. Across the metro area, their offerings are expanding as libraries help patrons tinker with 3-D printers, e-readers and social media. A growing catalog of e-books and e-magazines, combined with other online tools, extend resources far beyond the library walls.

Librarians, once masters of the card catalog, have learned to mine information online, offering help with everything from basic computer skills to Facebook and LinkedIn. When it comes to e-readers, in particular, librarians have become the go-to people for answers.

“We’re still teaching literacy. Now it’s digital literacy,” said Kim Johnson, manager of Anoka County, Minn.’s Rum River Library."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Yes!

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The Evolving Role of University Libraries - Martha Bedard / UConn Advance (blog)

The Evolving Role of University Libraries - Martha Bedard / UConn Advance (blog) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By: Suzanne Zack:

Martha Bedard: "It is a really exciting time for libraries. In all the years I’ve worked in libraries it has never, ever been boring. I remember the first time I barcoded a book, well before everything we bought had a barcode, and I added records to the first online catalog which replaced the print card catalog. Librarians were active on the Internet pre-graphical interface, pre-web."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The exciting future of academic libraries > abot the content and the spaces!

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toraki's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:30 AM

Ο ρόλος των ακαδημαϊκών βιβλιοθηκών σήμερα - και ένας ήσυχος χώρος για τους φοιτητές...