The Information P...
Follow
Find tag "academic-librarians"
15.7K views | +1 today
The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

ACRLog » Making Things in Academic Libraries, by Maura Smale

"I’m interested to think about how we as academic librarians can take the concept of libraries as makerspaces even further, especially with students. We need to find ways to support creating, not just finding. The Student as Producer project at the University of Lincoln in the UK is an interesting model to consider. Undergraduates are deeply involved in research across the curriculum, and thus come to their college studies to actually create knowledge rather than passively consume it. Again, this is something that perhaps comes more easily to faculty teaching semester-length courses or doing lab research with their students.

How can academic librarians, our contact with students often limited to a few minutes at the Reference Desk or an hour or so in the classroom, become involved at the making, producer level with students?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Academic libraries have a critical role to play serving as data quality hubs on campus

Michael J. Giarlo:

"Academic libraries have a critical role to play as data quality hubs on campus, based on the need for increased data quality to sustain "e-science," and on academic libraries' record of providing curation and preservation services as part of their mission to provide enduring access to cultural heritage and to support scholarly communication. Scientific data is shown to be sufficiently at risk to demonstrate a clear niche for such services to be provided. Data quality measurements are defined, and digital curation processes are explained and mapped to these measurements in order to establish that academic libraries already have sufficient competencies "in-house" to provide data quality services. Opportunities for improvement and challenges are identified as areas that are fruitful for future research and exploration.

Prepared for the NSF III #1247471 "Curating for Quality: Ensuring Data Quality to Enable New Science" workshop in Arlington, Virginia (September 2012)."

 

Pre-print copy available here: https://scholarsphere.psu.edu/files/g732d898n

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

How Google Impacts The Way Students Think

How Google Impacts The Way Students Think | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Terry Heick:

"It's always revealing to watch learners research."

 

"1. Google creates the illusion of accessibility

2. Google naturally suggests “answers” as stopping points

3. Being linear, Google obscures the interdependence of information"

 

"The natural limitations of Google have led to a cottage industry of digital platforms that have moved past simple mass curation. These traditional social bookmarking sites likeStumbleUpon, diigo, pearltrees, Scoopit, and others enable users to save information. Upstarts like pinterest make this process niche, allowing for plucking of visual artifacts, and allowing users to organize them into infinite categories.

But recent software has taken this even further, with apps like Learnist, mentormob, and even InstaGrokproviding more structure to how information is not only discovered, but sequenced and applied.

Which frankly blows Google out of the water–or at least restores Google back to its proper context.

A search engine, and nothing more."

 

>> Valuable to know as Information Professionals

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from The Future Librarian
Scoop.it!

Academic Librarian Research: A Survey of Attitudes, Involvement, and Perceived Capabilities

Academic Librarian Research: A Survey of Attitudes, Involvement, and Perceived Capabilities | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

One of the interesting articles in the latest issue of College & Research Libraries (September 2012) is this article on the development and results of a recent survey of academic librarians about their attitudes, involvement, and perceived capabilities using and engaging in primary research. The purpose of the survey was to inform the development of a continuing education program in research design.

 

"This article contributes a new perspective on the topic of how librarians think of their own abilities to conduct research with the introduction of a confidence scale and opens a line of inquiry for possible future research activities related to self-efficacy and research productivity..."


"Two other potentially profitable research agendas are identified in this article: defining a research culture in a library setting and performing a systematic review of published academic librarian practitioner-researchers to learn how to replicate their success."

 

The article (as well as all the articles in this issue) are available for download in pdf and html here: http://crl.acrl.org/content/73/5/431.full.pdf+html


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

The flipping librarian « NeverEndingSearch

The flipping librarian « NeverEndingSearch | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

 joycevalenza:

[...] "flipping as a serious sweet spot for the talents of librarians:

 

1. Who better to introduce the concept of flipping to the school?  

2. Who better to help educators select and curate the best possible bounty of educational content available? Flipping takes advantage of the new wealth of shared educational content and open education resources.  Finding and evaluating resources to support content area learning is already our business.  Knowing the curriculum and the needs of our teachers, we can scan the content of  TED-ed with its new archive of beautifully animation-enhanced and personally flippable TED talks as well the wealth of content on sites like the OER Commons, Curriki, Khan Academy, SolveforX and MIT Open Courseware. There’s so much more. Check out our guides to open educational resources and documentary and nonfiction film.

In our excitement about OER, it may be easy to forget that flipping can also exploit more traditional library content. Flipped teachers should take full advantage of the fabulous content we have in subscription databases containing content in all media flavors–video, print, newsfeeds, ebooks, journals, and more.

3. Who better to provide the professional development for the large number of teachers who need support before they are up to full flipping capability themselves? 

Here’s a list of just a few of the slidecasting/screensharing tools available, and my wiki for our teachers and our guide to copyright-friendly media.

4. And speaking of instruction, collaborating with classroom teachers, who better to guide and work with students to create content to contribute to the instructional archive? Take a look at the work of Mr. Marcos and his students on Mathtrain.com.  Take a look at the grammar lessons produced by the library and our video classes archived together with the more professional material available.  

5. And finally, what better to flip than the library?  Library instruction is ripe for flipping too. In fact, many of us already maintain a comprehensive virtual library.  And many of those virtual libraries curate learning material from our video channels, poster archives, slide archives, guides to projects and lessons and tools. We share our professional development, lessons, and tutorials in effective questioning, searching, documentation, thesis building, research strategies and more.

Perhaps, as a profession, we could be sharing this instruction more effectively. Frankly, I’d like to see an archive like the Cooperative Library Instruction Project (CLIP) for the k12 practitioners.  (Hmmm . . .  I think I see a new crowdsourcing platform on the horizon.)

And physically, if more research happens at home, should the library function even more heavily as making space?

 

I know from our stats that students use the resources of our virtual library heavily when they are not in the library–when they are in classes or at home or on the bench at sports.  I want to make sure that that platform supports instruction, learning and creativity more solidly, including its mobile version.

 

And when they are in the library, I want to make sure that learners have opportunities to collaborate and create well beyond the mere availability of those resources.

So why not flip this post? 

 

Here’s a learning playlist on flipping."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

E-Books: What a Librarian Wants - PageView - The Chronicle of Higher Education

E-Books: What a Librarian Wants - PageView - The Chronicle of Higher Education | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Jennifer Howard:

 

James R. Mouw  (University of Chicago Library):

First, if there are going to be print and digital versions, they should be available at the same time, so the library can decide which best suits its needs.

Second, digital monographs need to be made available in a way that allows the library to pick and choose and not make duplicate purchases.

Third, the Chicago library strongly prefers to buy digital content that’s guaranteed be permanently accessible, “so we essentially own it,” Mouw said.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

2012 top ten trends in academic libraries

A review of the trends and issues affecting academic libraries in higher education ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee

"Three leaders in academic librarianship were the catalysts for this discussion: Martin Halbert, dean of libraries at University of North Texas; Joan Lippincott, associate director of Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), and Mark Puente, director of diversity and leadership programs, Association of Research Libraries (ARL). This discussion forum augmented the trends identified by the committee.

These top trends are listed alphabetically. Each trend includes a brief discussion and references to the literature. The committee also compiled additional resources that may be of interest."

 

- "Communication value

- Data curation

- Digital preservation

- Higher education

- Information technology

- Mobile environments

- Patron driven e-book acquisition

- Scholarly communication

- Staffing

- User behaviours and expectations"

 

The committee would like to thank Erin Hood, research assistant at OCLC Research, for her assistance in producing this document."

 

   
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Future Trends in Libraries
Scoop.it!

Digitization 101: Is now the time for librarians?

Digitization 101: Is now the time for librarians? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Jill Hurst-Wahl:

New librarians are entering the job market fresh from receiving their master's degree (MLIS). The months and years spent in the classroom are behind them and they are anxious for the next chapter of their lives to begin.

 

[...]This is the time for librarians!"


Via nickcarman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

A social media manual for Canadian health librarians, by Dean Giustini > Slideshare

About Dean Giustini. I am the UBC Biomedical Branch librarian at Vancouver hospital. I teach at the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, and the School of Population and Public Health.

 

Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/giustinid/social-media-manual-for-canadian-health-librarians-2012?from=embed 

 

"An introduction to social media

Background This online session is an introduction to the use of social media tools such as Facebook,LinkedIn & Twitterfor health librarians.

The instructors are bloggers and regular users of social media in their daily information practices – they also use social media via their desktops and mobile devices.

Various methods to using social media will be discussed for beginners and more advanced users during theworkshop, which will consist of lectures, powerpoint presentationsand group discussions (and, if technically possible from your location, hands-on learning). During the workshop, several social media trends will be discussed and made relevantfor participants. These trends include social networking, blogging, microblogging and content generation using social media. The pros and cons of using social media in health care will bediscussed, and a range of resources and weblinks to reading and research will be provided.

Learning objectives:

To introduce social media including blogs, wikis, Twitter and Facebook and outline their use in health libraries in 2012

To provide examples of social media used by health librarians in Canada and the US

To engage health librarians in discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of social media using practical examples from health care and health library contexts

To begin a discussion about best practices in using social media in health libraries

Skills gained during workshop:

By the end of this course, participants will:

• Be able to list and understand the core components of major social media tools useful for health librarians and their patrons

• Have practical examples of ways to implement social media effectively in health libraries

• Understand issues in social media implementation such as audiences, goal setting, measurement and

• Discuss the impact of new social awareness services in health and medicine, and engage in thinking about future trends"

 

 

 

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from Inspired Librarians
Scoop.it!

The Future of Academic Libraries, An Interview with Steven J. Bell

The Future of Academic Libraries, An Interview with Steven J. Bell | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Steven J. Bell, President Elect of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), lays out a new vision for designing the future of academic libraries enabling librarians to become indispensable partners in the college teaching endeavor by integrating themselves into the instructional process.

 

Read a summary of some of the projects and articles Steven mentioned during the interview here: http://www.educationfutures.com/2012/03/26/the-future-of-academic-libraries-an-interview-with-steven-j-bell/


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa, University of Nicosia Library
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Professional development advice for academic librarians, via Eliza Anyangwe - The Guardian

Professional development advice for academic librarians, via Eliza Anyangwe - The Guardian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Eliza Anyangwe:

"What is the role of the academic librarian in the modern institution?"

 

[....]ideas and resources shared by our live chat panel:

 

- Simon Bains, deputy librarian, University of Manchester

- Jo Webb, head of Learning and Research Services, De Montfort University

- Andy Priestner, information and library services manager, Judge Business School, University of Cambridge

- Ned Potter, academic liaison librarian, University of York Library

- Ann Rossiter, executive director, Society of College, National and University Libraries (SCONUL)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries - Association of Research Libraries (ARL) #librarianscode

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries - Association of Research Libraries (ARL) #librarianscode | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) announces the release of the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries, a clear and easy-to-use statement of fair and reasonable approaches to fair use developed by and for librarians who support academic inquiry and higher education. The Code was developed in partnership with the Center for Social Media and the Washington College of Law at American University. Winston Tabb, Johns Hopkins University Dean of University Libraries and Museums and President of ARL, said, “This document is a testament to the collective wisdom of academic and research librarians, who have asserted careful and considered approaches to some very difficult situations that we all face every day.”

 

"The development of the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries is supported by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

For more information about the Code and this project, e-mail fairuseproject@arl.org"

 

pdf document: http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/code-of-best-practices-fair-use.pdf

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Beyond books: what it takes to be a 21st century librarian

Beyond books: what it takes to be a 21st century librarian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Emma Cragg and Katie Birkwood:

 

"From connecting with people to keeping up with the latest technologies, there is a whole lot more to the job than stamping due dates..."

 

"Books are only one aspect of what libraries and librarians are about. Librarianship is a people profession; a librarian's job is to connect people with the information they are seeking, whatever format that may take.

At their heart, all library jobs have a central purpose: to help people access and use information, for education, for work, or for pleasure. In all library roles customer service and communication skills are important. If anyone ever thought they'd become a librarian because they liked books or reading, they would be sorely disappointed if they did not also like people too. Libraries of all kinds are keen to demonstrate their value to as wide an audience as possible, and to open up access to culturally significant resources that they hold."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from The Future Librarian
Scoop.it!

Practical Academic Librarianship: The International Journal of the SLA Academic Division

Practical Academic Librarianship: The International Journal of the SLA Academic Division is a peer-reviewed journal for all academic librarians and informational professionals serving academic departments or affiliated institutions including centers,...

 

Available for download are articles appearing in the latest issue, vol. 2, no. 1 (2012).


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Strategic Planning for Social Media in Libraries (THE TECH SET® #15) - Books / Professional Development - Books for Academic Librarians - Books for Public Librarians - New Products - ALA Store

Strategic Planning for Social Media in Libraries (THE TECH SET® #15) - Books / Professional Development - Books for Academic Librarians - Books for Public Librarians - New Products - ALA Store | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Book by Sarah K. Steiner.

"This practical guide provides a scalable, step-by-step plan for creating and maintaining a successful library social media strategic plan. You’ll find detailed tips and advice on strategizing for social media services in a way that guides employee decision-making, maximizes efficiency, creates positive patron outcomes, protects against legal repercussions, and builds opportunities for flexibility, change, and new social media platform testing. You get all the key elements to build your strategic plan, including how to segment your audience, select a target audience, use focus groups and poll patrons, conduct a SWOT analysis to provide internal strength and support to your plan, and create a mission and vision plan for using social media."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Helicopter Librarians: Expect the Unexpected | Backtalk - Library Journal

Helicopter Librarians: Expect the Unexpected | Backtalk - Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Felicia A. Smith:

"Current students have different expectations and are used to a greater level of support. This is an opportunity to transform the profession regardless of emerging technology trends or fiscal constraints. This Helicopter Librarians approach does not require intensive training; that is why I do not include any checklists to follow. I am not developing any metrics; and I am not advocating for data-driven anything! This is a holistic approach to a human interaction based on individuality and genuine compassion.
A study based on the 2007 National Survey of Student Engagement reports that, contrary to popular belief; children of Helicopter Parents excelled in deeper learning activities and reported higher levels of educational gains as well as greater satisfaction with their college experience. The prevailing perception of Helicopter Parents is that their over-involvement is detrimental to their child’s growth. However, such support appeared to be welcomed by most students and actually beneficial to their overall well-being. Thus the first positive attribute of Helicopter Parents is the fact that they are sincerely concerned with the success of their children. This genuine concern has to be shared by Helicopter Librarians."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen du Toit from The Future Librarian
Scoop.it!

New Librarianship and the Library as Platform

"New Librarianship and the Library as Platform" Ticer 15th International Summer School on Digital Libraries 2012, Tillburg, Netherlands. Abstract: Change in academic libraries is nothing new."

 

"In his most recent lecture presented in Tillburg, Netherlands, R. David Lankes enjoins librarians to be "active in online education, new models of student learning, and helping the faculty adjust to disruptive change."  Furthermore, he suggests, "Rather than being the heart of the university centered on a collection, libraries must become hubs that spread new practice throughout the organization."

 

View the presentation here: http://quartz.syr.edu/rdlankes/Presentations/2012/Ticer-PDF.pdf

 


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Academic Librarians As Campus Hubs, by Joshua Kim | Inside Higher Ed

Academic Librarians As Campus Hubs, by Joshua Kim | Inside Higher Ed | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Joshua Kim:  

"RT @mrlibrarydude: Librarians already know this - but good to see it advocated by a non-librarian: Academic Librarians As Campus Hubs http://t.co/lqc6cPo4..."

 

"The library, and the librarians connected to the library space, seem to have some key advantages as connectors.  These include:

A Physical Space: And not just any physical space, but in most cases the campus library is at the geographic, intellectual and emotional center of the campus and/or school. Librarians seem to think about and pay great attention to their spaces."


An Interdisciplinary Focus: I work with quite a number of subject librarians at my institution, and all of them are amazingly knowledgeable about the disciplines in which they partner with faculty around teaching and research. Even subject librarians, however, retain a wide range of knowledge and a fluency in the language of the contiguous disciplines.


A Service Orientation: Service to our students, service to our faculty, service to colleagues, service to the mission of the institution, and service to larger ideals such as privacy and the availability of information (regardless of rank or status at the institution)."

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/academic-librarians-campus-hubs#ixzz22qGTatZy ;
Inside Higher Ed 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Library Intelligencer » Futures Thinking for Academic Librarians ...

Shirley (http://blogs.unimelb.edu.au/libraryintelligencer/author/shirley/)

 

"As e-books and the emerging digital library occupy today’s headlines, there appears to be a tacit consensus emerging from the discourse among academics, journalists, and librarians about the future of the book. That vision of the future, as portrayed in the trade literature and popular press, consigns this centuries-old technology to obsolescence, as if it were merely another information format.
This report explores alternative scenarios, where the technology of the printed book does not disappear or become extinct, but occupies a different position in a technological ecology characterized by the proliferation of e-books and digital libraries. The printed book has for centuries been the chief cognitive object of the library. The future status of that object should be of interest to all librarians, especially as they plan for the future; therefore, this report intentionally favors the continued existence of the printed book as a viable technology."

 

Document here: http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/issues/value/scenarios2012.pdf

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Challenges for academic libraries in difficult economic times | Research Information Network

Challenges for academic libraries in difficult economic times | Research Information Network | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Challenges for academic libraries in difficult economic times | Research Information Network http://t.co/BZKYMMTA...

 

"A new guide from the Research Information Network focuses on how academic librarians are experiencing and responding to financial cuts in the current economic climate.

Based upon data gathered in the UK and internationally, and focus groups with senior librarians during late 2009, the guide looks at the financial position of libraries, their strategies for dealing with challenging economic circumstances, and the value of libraries.

After a decade of growth in budgets and services, academic librarians now expect a sustained period of cuts over the next three to five years. The scale of these cuts means librarians are having to reconsider the kinds and levels of service they can provide in support of their universities missions.

This guide shows how librarians are responding to the issues of balancing expenditure between information resources and staffing and how they plan to sustain levels of service, as well as developing new services to meet new needs. It demonstrates that library directors need the support of senior managers across the higher education sector, as well as from publishers and other information providers, to help address the challenges, as well as the opportunities, faced.

The guide is available to download from the link below, along with a short two-page briefing. Hard copies are also available to order to distribute to colleagues, email contact@rin.ac.ukz"

 

Guide: http://www.rin.ac.uk/system/files/attachments/Challenges-for-libraries-FINAL-March10.pdf

 

Briefing: http://www.rin.ac.uk/system/files/attachments/challenges-for-libraries-flyer-screen-March10.pdf

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

Higher Education librarians take on Digital Curation | Mark Hepworth

"One thing about the event that impressed me was the way academic librarians at the workshop were taking on digital curation and developing faculties digital curation skills. In other words thinking beyond the traditional remit of information literacy and information management."

 

The Digital Curation Centre (DCC) organised an event at Loughborough University.

Go to http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/data-management-roadshows/dcc-roadshow-loughborough

 

 

"Here are a number of factors forcing universities to take the curation of research data more seriously:

- research funders ask for it;
- the freedom of information act and data protection act necessitate it i.e. systematic curation will enable data to be stored and accessed effectively and securely.
- fines may be levied if data is not managed in a way that complies with the Data Protection legislation.
- it will enable the sharing of data that will foster innovative research."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen du Toit
Scoop.it!

What academic librarians do…. | The Search Principle blog > health librarians

What academic librarians do…. | The Search Principle blog > health librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Dean Giustini

"Health librarians assume a number of important roles within the university and academic health community. For example, they evaluate, collect and curate print and electronic resources for the purposes of delivering reference and information services to their users. They evaluate the information needs of users. They are responsible for the provision of liaison – face-to-face & digital for a variety of disciplines and professions. They provide expertise in the area of systematic review searching. They monitor information trends such as data curation, data visualization and social network analysis. They teach courses and workshops on a range of information technology topics to academics, clinicians and health care managers. Even though health professionals are increasingly self-sufficient in locating information, due to easy access to information on the web via search engines, and because health librarians have increased their teaching in information literacy, there is still much teaching to be provided. With so much information, some concern has been expressed that health librarians are not teaching the necessary skills for users to be self-reliant. Health librarians need to do some creative strategic planning to assess these deficits."

more...