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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Vannesla library by Helen & Ward architects

Vannesla library by Helen & Ward architects | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The architects of studio Helen & Ward (founded by Siv Helen Stangeland and Reinhard Kropf) have designed a library in Vennesla, Norway, according to principles of relational design.

 

"[...] 

architects of Helen & Ward, who designed a multifunctional library in Vennesla, whose interiors resemble the belly of an enormous wooden whale.

The new library incorporates a cafè, meeting places, an administrative area and connects a learning center to a pre-existing community house according to principles of relational design.

A large glass façade, an external loggia which dialogues with the urban environment and an internal passage make the center a place that is open to the public, easily accessible and hospitable.

The project is supported by a veritable skeleton composed of 27 "ribs", hybrid elements that fuse structure, infrastructure, furniture and interiors in a single architectural element.

Each "rib" is an acoustic-absorbent multilayered and multifunctional panel, from which the air ducts and columns pass. The modules serve also as niches, lighting covers and tables. An idea that won the library a class A standing for its low energy consumption according to Norvegian standards."


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Responsive Web Design and Libraries, by Lisa Kurt

Responsive Web Design and Libraries, by Lisa Kurt | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Lisa Kurt writes a great piece for the ACRL Tech Connect blog on Responsive Web Design and Libraries. This is such a timely article given that there are so many different mobile devices out there and libraries are striving to develop mobile-ready websites and native apps.
“The very basic benefit to creating a responsive website design is that you have one site for all devices- it’s intended to be inclusive for desktop machines and a variety of devices. A responsive site does not require anything of the user; no downloading or additional buttons to click, the result is immediate. That’s it. Rather than separate approaches for mobile through either a mobile site or mobile applications and then another approach for desktop machines- this method is flexible and covers it all under one design.”


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10 Interesting Ways to Use Instagram for Your Library

10 Interesting Ways to Use Instagram for Your Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Ellyssa Kroski
"Instagram is a very popular mobile photo sharing app that’s currently being used by over 80 million users. It was acquired by Facebook earlier this year, so it’s something that’s going to be around for quite some time. Instagram allows you to put all sorts of filters and effects on images and then share them with your network and the world. Here are ten ideas for ways you could use this immensely popular app for your library"


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Could Libraries Become Precinct Hubs? - DesignBuild Source

Could Libraries Become Precinct Hubs? - DesignBuild Source | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"When considering the design and function of precinct developments, thoughts often naturally run to bars, cafés, sporting venues and theatres. While these spaces are important as community hubs, libraries are taking on a growing role in the world of architecture.
Library developments have gained prominence in recent months, with home developers and interior designers placing heavy importance on private libraries and commercial and government entities investing heavily in the development of public library spaces."


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Envisioning the library of the future - online survey

Online survey:

 

"This website aims to capture your views on the purpose and value of public libraries.

This is part of a piece of research entitled Envisioning the library of the future, commissioned by Arts Council England. This programme of research will inform the development of the Arts Council’s long-term vision for public libraries in England. This research began in February 2012, with the findings due to be published in a final report in the Autumn 2012.

Along with this online element, we are also undertaking focused research in face-to-face workshops with members of the public in various parts of the country so that we have a wide range of people contributing to our discussion and developing ideas.

The website is open for receiving your comments until Sunday 21 October 2012."

 

Envisioning the library of the future: http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/supporting-libraries/libraries-consultation

 

 

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What Can Libraries Learn from New User (and Non-User!) E-Reading Data from the Pew Internet - Slideshare Project? | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

"At the Library 2.012 worldwide virtual conference, Pew Internet Research Analyst Kathryn Zickuhr and ALA Program Director Larra Clark will discuss key findings from these reports—including a brand new analysis focused on younger Americans' reading preferences and library use habits. The session also will explore immediate practical implications for U.S. public libraries."

 

Slideshare here: http://www.slideshare.net/PewInternet/what-can-libraries-learn-from-new-user-and-nonuserereading-data-from-the-pew-internet-project

 

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MVRDV: book mountain + library quarter, spijkenisse

MVRDV: book mountain + library quarter, spijkenisse | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
a mountain of bookshelves is contained by a glass-enclosed structure and pyramidal roof with a total surface area of 9,300 square meters.

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A Newbie's Guide to Publishing: E-books in Libraries: They Still Don't Get It

A Newbie's Guide to Publishing: E-books in Libraries: They Still Don't Get It | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

> From the perspectives of authors:

 

Joe Konrath:

 

"The problem is organization. We need someone to act as a liaison between publishers and libraries to run something like this on a big scale. And I believe that person should be paid. How big a job this will be, and how much of a cut they deserve, can be discussed in the comments section. But indie authors need to come together to offer libraries their books, and dealing with 9000 different library systems would be a full time job.

As for my personal view on how publishers deal with libraries, I think Librarian X heaped an appropriate amount of scorn upon them. Greed is hurting libraries, and authors. The Big 6 seem to think they still have control over the industry, and readers, including librarians, will pay whatever high price they charge.

The Big 6 are wrong. More and more libraries are going to stop buying your expensive, expiring ebooks. And that will accelerate the end of the bestseller I predicted years ago.

Libraries want ebooks. As authors, we may soon be in a position to give them our books at fair prices."

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Will Public Libraries Become Extinct? - Forbes

Will Public Libraries Become Extinct? - Forbes | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Marc Bodnick:

"Will public libraries become extinct? This question was originally answered on Quora by Erica Friedman and Marc Bodnick."

 

[...]

 "the obvious:

Libraries provide many services, yes, but the most important service is lending books. Tablets & eReaders are a much better way to get a book than borrowing it or buying it at a bookstore. You can get the book right away, the split second you want it! More, and more, and more people are going to buy tablet devices & eReaders over the next ten years. Power readers are disproportionately more likely to buy tablets & eReaders. Anyone who really loves reading, buying, and borrowing books is likely going to buy an eReader. Once you really start enjoy reading on a Kindle or iPad, your interest in visiting a bookstore or library goes down precipitously. Buying a book cheaply on your Kindle or iPad is so much better than (1) go to a library, (2) cross-fingers hope they have the book in stock, (3) borrow the book, (4) read it, (5) remember to return it, and (6) drive back to the library to return it. That’s a lot of work."

 

 

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Are Dewey’s Days Numbered?: Libraries Nationwide Are Ditching the Old Classification System | School Library Journal

Are Dewey’s Days Numbered?: Libraries Nationwide Are Ditching the Old Classification System | School Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By By Tali Balas Kaplan, Andrea K. Dolloff, Sue Giffard, and Jennifer Still-Schiff:

 

"Our post-Dewey system, which we’ve affectionately dubbed Metis (after the clever, crafty mother of the Greek god Athena), puts things together in a way that encourages kids to move easily from one idea to another. Zack’s natural and simple segue from paper craft to sewing would probably never have happened with Dewey: it would have entailed a jump from 735 to 646. That’s a big reason why a small but growing number of school and public libraries—from the Perry Branch Library in Gilbert, AZ; and Burke High School in Omaha, NE; to the newly opened Carmel Elementary School in Clarksville, TN; and Darien Library in Connecticut—have ditched Dewey, or at least have escorted the 136-year-old system partway out the door.
Has Metis made a difference? Absolutely. During the past year, in our middle-grade library (for kids in grades three to five), we’ve seen dramatic increases in circulation—including around 100 percent or more in our “Sports,” “Countries,” “Humor,” and “Mystery” sections, and a spike of 240 percent in “Machines” (which includes the military and transportation). And in those always under-used sections like “Languages” and what we now call “Community” (sections of the 300s in Dewey), we’ve seen a jump of more than 300 percent. The early grades library, for preK through second-grade kids, has seen similar gains in areas such as “Humor” (87 percent), “Scary” (148 percent), and “Adventure” (110 percent)."


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Library and Information History - timeline

Library and Information History - timeline | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
A timeline of libraries and information history including technologies, epic events and just cool things you didn't know before.

Via Joao Brogueira, Errol A. Adams JD/MLS
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Mindful reasons to revisit our local libraries » Mindful Living Network

Mindful reasons to revisit our local libraries » Mindful Living Network | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"With free information online, many people question the value of public libraries. Unfortunately, they're overlooking how important these institutions are to our community..."

 

"Here are Mindful reasons (from Public Libraries online) for why we should revisit our local libraries:

 

Community builders: Local libraries not only address local social problems, but also preserve historic artifacts and relevant histories.

Centers of diversity: They provide information about diverse cultures. They also offer programs and sources for immigrants and non-English speakers.

Centers of art: Public libraries provide space and information for free art exploration and expression.

Education: Writers of this Public Libraries article call libraries “the people’s university,” providing knowledge for all, regardless of socioeconomic statuses.

Guardians of knowledge: Our libraries help with child development, not only by providing books but also programs like summer reading and tutoring."

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m-Libraries Conference keynote presentations- available live online | 24-26th September 2012

“From margin to mainstream: mobile technologies transforming lives and libraries”

 

"Mobile technology has transformed so many aspects of our lives: how we work, how we communicate, how we study and how we play. This conference will explore and share the innovative work carried out in libraries around the world to deliver services and resources to users via mobile and hand-held devices.

The fourth International m-libraries Conference is hosted by The Open University and Athabasca University and it will bring together researchers, educators, technical developers, managers and library professionals to share experience and exchange expertise with colleagues at the cutting edge of mobile use and development and to generate ideas for future developments."

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ACRLog » Making Things in Academic Libraries, by Maura Smale

"I’m interested to think about how we as academic librarians can take the concept of libraries as makerspaces even further, especially with students. We need to find ways to support creating, not just finding. The Student as Producer project at the University of Lincoln in the UK is an interesting model to consider. Undergraduates are deeply involved in research across the curriculum, and thus come to their college studies to actually create knowledge rather than passively consume it. Again, this is something that perhaps comes more easily to faculty teaching semester-length courses or doing lab research with their students.

How can academic librarians, our contact with students often limited to a few minutes at the Reference Desk or an hour or so in the classroom, become involved at the making, producer level with students?"

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Hackerspaces as 21st Century Libraries, by Ryan McDermott

Ryan McDermott explains hackerspaces as the 21st century library.youtube.com...
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Creating Communities Through Makerspaces by Buffy Hamilton / Atlanta Mini Maker Faire 2012

Creating Communities Through Libraries and Makerspaces Presented by Buffy J. Hamilton, The Unquiet Librarian 

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University Presses & Libraries Turn to Pinterest to Promote Books, by Kate Rix

University Presses & Libraries Turn to Pinterest to Promote Books, by Kate Rix | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"...university presses are making widespread use of Pinterest to promote new book titles. Likewise, academic libraries are using their Pinterest pages to promote events and help fund major capital improvements. For libraries and archives, a major ongoing mission is to keep the collections visible. It’s not easy to let the world know about your one-of-a-kind holdings, and Pinterest potentially offers a great way to bring these materials to new and  younger audiences."

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Joint Libraries: Models That Work

Joint Libraries: Models That Work | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Claire B. Gunnels, Susan E. Green, and Patricia M. Butler:

"A public/community college joint-use library is an especially good combination. The missions and the service populations are similar enough to provide significant overlap and allow for excellent services to all users. For example, community college students find that the public library’s collections of materials and resources meet many of their academic needs and provide an excellent complement to the materials owned by the college. Likewise, community college students respond well to the friendly service orientation provided by a well-trained public library reference staff. I think that other combinations, such as a high school/PL or university/PL joint-use library, present additional challenges to good service that we do not face."


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