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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Closing the Gap in Librarian, Faculty Views of Academic Libraries | Research

Closing the Gap in Librarian, Faculty Views of Academic Libraries | Research | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"In this age of outcomes measurement, many academic librarians are focused—and rightly so—on making sure they best serve students. Yet students are not the only population of end users on an academic campus. Faculty, too, are conduits not only to students but to library users in their own right. As well, studies of faculty attitudes such as Ithaka’s often show that, even as faculty increasingly depend on library-brokered online access to expensive databases and electronic journals, the off-site availability of modern resources may leave many faculty members less aware of the crucial role of the library in their and their students’ workflow."


Full report here: http://www.thedigitalshift.com/research


Karen du Toit's insight:

Good reminder to academic librarians!

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The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries - Times of San Diego

The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries - Times of San Diego | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Peter C. Herman"For the past few years, both the California State University and the University of California libraries have been experimenting with packages that replace paper books with e-books. The advantages are obvious. With e-books, you no longer have to schlep to a library to take out a book. You just log on from whatever device connects you to the web, at whatever time and in whatever state of dress, and voila! the book appears on your screen.

But the real attraction is price. Library budgets, along with university budgets, have been slashed, and such companies as Pearson and Elsevier offer e-book packages that make it possible to gain access (I’ll explain the awkward syntax in a moment) to lots of books at what seems like a minimal cost. The savings are multiplied when the package serves the entire system. So instead of each campus buying a paper book, all 23 CSU’s, for instance, share a single e-book. That’s the theory, at least. The reality is very different."

 

...

"Instead, a library pays to access a data file by one of two routes: “PDA,” or “Patron-Driven Acquisition,” in which a vendor makes available a variety of e-books, and a certain number of “uses” (the definition varies) triggers a purchase, or a subscription to an e-library that does not involve any mechanism for buying the e-book. Both avenues come loaded with all sorts of problems.

First, reading an e-book is a different, and lesser, experience that reading a paper book, just aswatching a movie at home differs from watching one in a theatre.

There’s a huge difference between casual and college reading, and recent studies prove beyond doubt that while e-books are perfectly fine for the latest John Grisham or Fifty Shades of Grey, they actively discourage intense reading and deep learning."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The impact of e-books on libraries and learning. Not good!

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The OER Discovery Role for Libraries - vote at Micropoll

The OER Discovery Role for Libraries - vote at Micropoll | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Click here to vote.


Via John Shank
Karen du Toit's insight:

Vote on the role of libraries in the discovery of quality open educational resources! 

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John Shank's curator insight, February 21, 2014 12:31 PM

1 Second Survey on the role of libraries in the discovery of OERs.

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University of Oregon Science Libraries Back Up Fossils with 3D Printer - Library Journal

University of Oregon Science Libraries Back Up Fossils with 3D Printer - Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
By Ian Chant:

"At the University of Oregon (UO), staff at the Science Library have only had  an in-house 3D printer for a few months, but have wasted no time putting the new equipment to use. At the beginning of January, the library printed a 3D model of a rare fossil in the UO paleontology department’s collection—the remains of a 5-million-year old saber toothed salmon."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great use of a 3D printer in the library

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University libraries of the 21st century – in pictures

University libraries of the 21st century – in pictures | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

We invited you to help us document the university library of the 21st century. From the uber-traditional to the downright quirky, here's a selection of your pictures featuring some of the most interesting designs

Karen du Toit's insight:

Photos of university libraries of the future - selected from photos submitted by readers of the The Guardian

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New Five Good Ideas I’ve seen for Public Libraries (Others too!) – Stephen's Lighthouse

New Five Good Ideas I’ve seen for Public Libraries (Others too!) – Stephen's Lighthouse | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

...good ideas lately so I thought I’d share them here:


Idea #1: Timelapse Video

Idea #2: Security Guard Training

Idea #3: Displays

Idea #4: Shelving Children’s Books

Idea #5: Customer Service Models

Karen du Toit's insight:

Good ideas for libraries!

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New Metrics Providers Help Keep Libraries in the Research-Tracking Game - Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription)

New Metrics Providers Help Keep Libraries in the Research-Tracking Game - Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Jennifer Howard:

"A critical part of the library's job is helping the research faculty "understand and be able to measure the impact of their works," he says. "And since much of their work takes place online now, and not just in the cited periodical literature, there are lots of new ways to measure their impact."

The first step, and sometimes a big one, is to make scholars aware that there is a world of metrics beyond citations and impact factors. Even scholars who are active online aren't always aware "that the impact of their work in those new forums can be measured," Mr. Del­iyannides says."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries playing a role in research tracking!

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