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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Reinventing libraries for 'hanging out, messing around and geeking out' - CNN

Reinventing libraries for 'hanging out, messing around and geeking out' - CNN | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Collections, staff and space dedicated to teens have existed in libraries for years. Now, libraries are shifting those resources to developing learning spaces where teens can create content instead of consume it. Research has shown the widespread positive impacts of afterschool programs on academic achievement and social behavior, especially in low-income communities. The need for spaces that engage teens becomes even greater during summer break, when teens have more free time, said Elyse Adler with the Nashville Public Library.
Karen du Toit's insight:
Focus on teens - very exciting!
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Freek Kraak's curator insight, June 4, 4:17 AM

Wat kan de bibliotheek betekenen voor jongeren? Hier een voorbeeld uit de VS.

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What 21st-century libraries can learn from this 19th-century institution, Angela Tung

What 21st-century libraries can learn from this 19th-century institution, Angela Tung | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Like most library students, I learned about the Dewey Decimal System, the Library of Congress, and the father of the American public library, Andrew Carnegie. But I also learned about the necessary transformation of the library in the 21st century. In order to survive, it was hammered into our brains again and again, a library has to be more than just a “brick and mortar” receptacle of books. It needs to be a technical hub, a community center, a place you might go instead of Starbuck’s."

[...]

Hull House offered a variety of services that seem like precursors to the services that libraries are providing today. Like the Arizona libraries that have added public health nurses, Addams and her Hull House co-founder Ellen Gates Starr “volunteered as on-call doctors when the real doctors either didn’t show up or weren’t available.” They also “acted as midwives, saved babies from neglect, prepared the dead for burial, nursed the sick, and sheltered domestic violence victims.”

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Volunteers “held classes in literature, history, art, domestic activities (such as sewing),” and practical courses such as bookbinding, “which was timely—given the employment opportunities in the growing printing trade,” which sounds a lot like the free computer classes offered by many public libraries today."

.


Via Trudy Raymakers
Karen du Toit's insight:

Thoughts around the Hull House which rendered a variety of community services, the same as expected from a public library today!

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Library spaces we love | International Librarians Network

Library spaces we love | International Librarians Network | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Discussion topic 2 of the International Librarians Network is about the library spaces we  love. The country coordinators are each giving an account of a library space that they have visited or belong to.

 

 

Photo: ‘Library’ CC by the Pale Side of Insomnia (From the post: http://ilnetwork.wordpress.com/2014/03/15/discussion-topic-library-spaces-we-love/)

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Very inspiring to see different libraries from around the globe with inspiring spaces and services!

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Accessing historical archives as a disabled user; with recommendations

Accessing historical archives as a disabled user; with recommendations | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Viv Dunstan:

"I recently gave a talk to a conference for archivists on my perceptions as a disabled user of archives. I have a progressive neurological disease, and sometimes use a wheelchair. ...

[...]

...list of recommendations for archivists to improve accessibility. I will repeat these here, for the benefit of any reading:

Would ask archivists to consider how accessible their search rooms are, including the layout within the room itself. This is potentially of great benefit to physically disabled archive users, but a more accessible layout can benefit users in general as well, for example tables and chairs that are easier to move around, paper catalogues easier to access etc.As a counterpoint to that ask you to be more aware of the potential need for people to research at a distance, and do not always assume lengthy on-the-spot research is practical or the default approach, and consider enabling other modes of provision for usersTo that end make sure that online catalogues are as detailed as they can be, and improve them where necessaryAs well as archivist initiated digitisation projects archivists should consider supporting digitisation on demand, including permitting digital photography of records, whether a per page copying fee is charged for such photography, or waived for disability users"
Karen du Toit's insight:

Good checklist of points to consider for archives with regards accessibility! 

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Study on emerging technologies librarians - IFLA Library

Study on emerging technologies librarians - IFLA Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Emerging technologies librarians: how a new library position and its competencies are evolving http://t.co/7NM20n0jxb via @INFOdocket #IFLA

 

RADNIECKI, Tara (2013) Study on emerging technologies librarians: how a new library position and its competencies are evolving to meet the technology and information needs of libraries and their patrons. Paper presented at: IFLA World Library and Information Congress, 17 - 23 August 2013, Singapore.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Librarians competencies EVOLVING to meet the technology and information needs of libraries and it spatrons!

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LAI CDG's curator insight, July 23, 2013 3:35 AM

Emerging technologies and how librarians are developing new skills and competencies to meet changing needs of users.

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Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations - Pew Research

Younger Americans’ Library Habits and Expectations - Pew Research | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Kathryn Zickuhr, Lee Rainie and Kristen Purcell:

"Americans ages 16-29 are heavy technology users, including in using computers and internet at libraries. At the same time, most still read and borrow printed books, and value a mix of traditional and technological library services.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interesting results!

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Folding shelves - ebooks and the impact on libraries and publishers > the final verdict not yet out!

Folding shelves - ebooks and the impact on libraries and publishers > the final verdict not yet out! | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Librarians and the book industry have different interests. But without getting future generations into the book-reading habit, both will perish, says Stuart Hamilton of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions. Library lending plays a big if unquantifiable role in nurturing a love of reading.

Some even wonder if e-lending is in the libraries’ interests, since it encourages people to stay at home, rather than use them as a public space (one reason why they enjoy taxpayers’ backing). One critic privately calls e-lending the “Librarian Unemployment Act of 2013”. But Pew, a research firm, reckons 62% of American libraries are the only source of free internet access and computers in their communities. Many patrons also come in to ask for help with learning to use their e-readers. The libraries’ story has plenty more pages yet.

Karen du Toit's insight:

A good summary of the current ebook saga with regards libraries and publishers!

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Technology in libraries improves access to the legal system

By Russ Van Arsdale, Executive Director, Northeast CONTACT 

Patrons of Maine’s public libraries will soon have a chance to hear from experts on a number of legal issues at no charge. Low income people may be able to confer one-on-one with those experts, again at no cost.

The reason is what’s becoming known as “Lawyers In Libraries.” It’s an outreach effort coordinated by the Volunteer Lawyers Project, or VLP. A grant allows VLP to arrange clinics by video conference; a lawyer speaks in real time at one location while people at libraries across the state watch and listen. After the lawyer’s presentation, viewers can ask general questions about the law, although the lawyer cannot serve as a questioner’s legal representative.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Lawyers in Libraries! - Free expert help!

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As the world goes digital, libraries adjust their strategies, by @marytablante | USA TODAY College

As the world goes digital, libraries adjust their strategies, by @marytablante | USA TODAY College | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Beyond using the library as a place to study, here are some other ways students can make use of library services provided by their universities:

• Check out laptops, iPads or calculators

• Go beyond Wikipedia and Google

Term papers and theses rely on more than a simple Google search. Professors encourage students to use scholarly and peer-reviewed articles.

University libraries have more than 600 databases...

• Ask a librarian 24/7

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries are changing > spaces and services!

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Libraries stack up in new digital world | roanoke.com

Libraries stack up in new digital world | roanoke.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by

TONIA MOXLEY 

Welcome to the modern research university library, where new skills and even new spaces are being developed to serve the needs of scholars, scientists and students working in the digital age.

From a digital-ready classroom to furniture reminiscent of the starship Enterprise, library officials say they are developing new ways to serve the campus, and the public.

As libraries transform for the digital age, “it’s an exciting time,” said Judy Ruttenberg of the Association of Research Libraries, a membership and advocacy organization for 125 of the nation’s largest research libraries, including the Library of Congress.

“When university libraries housed large print collections and people had to come there to use them, that was a different model. Now students, scholars and researchers have many options, and the library serves in a different way,” Ruttenberg said.

To keep libraries relevant amid the rapid expansion of Web-based information, Tech officials are using architects and student advisory committees to develop spaces and services that draw the campus into the library.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries of the future! Collections, spaces and services look different!

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Upton library provides free online classes - Milford Daily News

By Mike Gleason/Daily News staff:

The town library has joined a service that allows it to offer free online courses to its patrons.

Library Director Matthew Bachtold said the library started the service, called "UniversalClass" in mid-February.

"We're trying to branch out into more online accessible things that people can do from home," he said. "Last year, we started offering online language instruction courses through Byki, which stands for 'Before You Know It.'"

The success of that program, he said, led the library to consider further online offerings.

"The biggest issue we have is space limitations," Bachtold said. "We wouldn't have room on our shelves for 500 textbooks, but we can offer 500 courses through this service."



Read more: http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/x898138140/Upton-library-provides-free-online-classes#ixzz2LtrJ9OBC

Karen du Toit's insight:

Branching out with more online accessible offerings from the library!

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Shelf life: Missoula library's Web on Wheels brings tech help to doorsteps - The Missoulian

Shelf life: Missoula library's Web on Wheels brings tech help to doorsteps - The Missoulian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"Shelf life: Missoula library's Web on Wheels brings tech help...
Karen du Toit's insight:

By Ira Sather-Olson for the Missoulian

Hop on the Missoula Public Library’s Web on Wheels (W.O.W.) bus at one of its scheduled stops this month and you can take advantage of a new service it’s offering that covers basic computer maintenance techniques.

You can learn how to set up free virus scan programs, clean up your hard drive, compress your memory, delete old programs and more."

 

>>Änother great service to consider for libraries!

 

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Doug Mirams's curator insight, December 12, 2012 6:43 AM

Another innovative example of expanding mobile library outreach into a community, this time assisting clients with basic computer skills.

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60 Ways to Use a Library Card - Peoria Journal Star (blog)

60 Ways to Use a Library Card - Peoria Journal Star (blog) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Emily Lambe:

"Check out these great ways to use your library card and library from the American Library Association. 1. Download an e-book. 

read more here: http://www.pjstar.com/blogs/checkitout/x142966941/60-Ways-to-Use-a-Library-Card

 

> Also useful for other libraries to market their services!

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University Of Michigan Opens Napping Stations In Campus Library - Huffington Post

University Of Michigan Opens Napping Stations In Campus Library - Huffington Post | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"University Herald University Of Michigan Opens Napping Stations In Campus Library Huffington Post On the surface, college libraries are designated as a place to study, check out books and use the computer. The Central Student Government has implemented its first napping station. The idea is geared toward those who are studying hard for tests but live too far from the library to run home for a quick nap. It was pitched to CSG by engineering junior Adrian Bazbaz, who was interviewed for an article in the Michigan Daily."
Karen du Toit's insight:
Genius!
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Joyce Valenza's curator insight, May 26, 9:50 AM

Really meeting user needs.

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Technology Trends in Libraries & the Emerging Generation, by David Lee King

"Technology has changed the face of libraries, and is continuing to change how we work and how we deliver services to our younger customers and their parents. This presentation introduces emerging technology trends and needs of children and teens, and how those trends can help re-shape library services. Examples of how to incorporate these trends into libraries are provided."


Via Guus van den Brekel
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great ideas for libraries to incorporate the youth in their services!

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Libraries as ‘Sponsors of Literacies’: Diving Deep to Expose Narratives & Metanarratives | Buffy Hamilton, DMLcentral

Libraries as ‘Sponsors of Literacies’: Diving Deep to Expose Narratives & Metanarratives | Buffy Hamilton, DMLcentral | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

In my last post “Literacies and Fallacies,” I introduced Deborah Brandt’s conceptual approach of sponsors of literacy that connects individual literacy development to the economic development of literacy.  I also shared a rationale for why libraries should use this critical interpretive lens and offered an initial list of questions as focal points of inquiry to consider.

[...]

By exploring “who or what underwrites occasions of literacy learning and use” (Brandt, The Sponsors of Literacy 2), librarians are much better positioned to better understand and contextualize these three key issues identified by Brandt (6):

1.  How the access, organization, and privileging of literacy opportunities are impacted by issues related to race, class, and gender.
2.  How literacy sponsors contribute to what Brandt defines as the literacy crisis:  the perceived gap between rising standards for achievement and people’s ability to meet them.
3.  How might sponsors of literacy interpret their ability to provide resources and opportunities that help people transform their uses of literacy that facilitate identity development, agency and social mobility?

Karen du Toit's insight:

Thoughts on approaches towards literacy and learning and perspectives on narratives being valued in library services!

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Bringing Yoga to Public Libraries - Christa Avampato

Bringing Yoga to Public Libraries - Christa Avampato | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Bringing Yoga to Public Libraries - The Huffington Post (RT @yoga: Inspiring interview with Christa Avampato (@christanyc), on bringing yoga to the public via libraries: http://t.co/wmEzKFqA52)...

 

This is an interview with Christa Avampato, who started a yoga program in 2005 at the Darden School at UVA (where she received an MBA degree). Not surprisingly, many of her classmates were under a lot of stress, so she began teaching a free weekly class at the school. In 2009 her apartment building caught fire; she lost nearly all of her belongings, and almost lost her life. Her yoga practice, coupled with therapy, helped her to heal from the resulting PTSD. She wanted to share that with others who need healing.

Living in New York City, she saw so many people who need the healing power of yoga and can't attend studio classes for a variety of reasons, teachers who want to teach and don't know how to get started, and spaces such as the New York Public Library that are under-utilized. Christa started Compass Yoga to create a bridge between the people who need yoga and don't have a means to access it, teachers who want to give their time and talents, and spaces that might house these connections.

Her one weekly class at the local New York Public Library branch two years ago has expanded to 12 weekly classes at five different NYPL branches and two senior centers. All of these classes are free and open to the public; they draw an average of 25 students to every class. 

Karen du Toit's insight:

One of the great services that can be done for the community in a public library! Love it!

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A library is not just about books: it's also a place for the vulnerable

A library is not just about books: it's also a place for the vulnerable | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Angela Clarke: If another 400 UK libraries close by 2016, as predicted, the true loss to society will be even greater than we realise

 

...

"My own fragility revealed that a library is not just a reference service: it is also a place for the vulnerable. From the elderly gentleman whose only remaining human interaction is with library staff, to the isolated young mother who relishes the support and friendship that grows from a Baby Rhyme Time session, to a slow moving 30-something woman collecting her CDs, libraries are a haven in a world where community services are being ground down to nothing. I've always known libraries are vital, but now I understand that their worth cannot be measured in books alone."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The library, a place without judgement, open to anyone and their needs! 

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Designing Better Libraries » Getting Community Members Beyond The Level One Library Experience

Among the more recognized and often repeated findings emerging from Ithaka S & R’s faculty research studies, including the recent 2012 report, is the revelation that faculty primarily perceive the academic library as their purchasing agent.

[...]

Four levels of user experience (column titled “Building Customer Communities is the Key to Creating Value“) and how to get there:


1. In Level One the organization is perceived by its customers as simply the supplier of some commodity

2. A Level Two experience would represent an improvement for librarians because it moves beyond content to a state where community members believe you help them accomplish something, but it’s more than just basic productivity.

3. At Level Three there is more engagement, emotional connection and relationship building.

4. the library achieves platform status.


Karen du Toit's insight:

Assessment of library experiences, and how to go to an engaged relationship with users!

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repeatagain's curator insight, May 9, 2013 5:18 PM

what libraries deliver is a level one experience – and we need to do better than that...

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Smashwords: How Libraries Can Launch Community Publishing Initiatives with Self-Published Ebooks

Smashwords: How Libraries Can Launch Community Publishing Initiatives with Self-Published Ebooks | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Mark Coker: Libraries are uniquely qualified to orchestrate community resources and talent to help local writers become professional self-publishers. By holding seminars and classes, and by bringing local authors together face to face with readers and aspiring authors, libraries can help unleash the talent locked inside the minds and fingertips of their local community's writers.  They can also help ensure a steady future supply of library-friendly authors who will want to supply their ebooks to libraries.


Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/17571498#


Karen du Toit's insight:

Great tools and tips for self-publishing at libraries!

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