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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Archival Manoeuvres: Managing Digitization Projects - podcast Ep 10

More Podcast, Less Process is a podcast about archives, archivists, and the archival enterprise hosted by Jefferson Bailey and Joshua Ranger. More information: keepingcollections.org/more-podcast-less-process/

 

Episode 10: Archival Manoeuvres: Managing Digitization Projects

Miwa Yokoyama (Digital Project Manager, Carnegie Hall) and Mitch Brodsky (Digital Archives Manager, New York Philharmonic) visit Josh and Jefferson to discuss their experiences managing archival digitization projects.

 

(Internet Archive, iTunes, or direct download)

Karen du Toit's insight:

Digitization projects

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Stanford U. Libraries Begins Building New Tool To Assist in Creation of Digital Collection Websites - Spotlight | LJ INFOdocket

Stanford U. Libraries Begins Building New Tool To Assist in Creation of Digital Collection Websites - Spotlight | LJ INFOdocket | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Feedback from librarians, curators, faculty, and other stakeholders has made it clear that there is a strong demand for feature-rich collection sites and, as the volume of digitized content continues to grow, that this demand will continue to outweigh our resources for producing them with a custom-built approach.

To address this, in the first quarter of 2014, SUL began building an application called Spotlight.

Spotlight is a Blacklight plugin that enables librarians, curators, and researchers who are responsible for digital collections to create attractive, feature-rich websites that showcase these collections. Spotlight leverages the rich resource discovery capabilities of Blacklight and extends it to allow curators to feature content from a repository system by enhancing it with rich narrative and context. Spotlight has similarities to existing exhibit solutions but seeks to expand on current models to more tightly integrate with repository infrastructures and bring equally strong focus on search results, objects, and supporting intellectual scaffolding.

The lead designer on the effort, Gary Geisler, took a user-centered approach to conceiving of a highly generalizable solution that took into account Stanford’s local needs as well as feedback from peers at other cultural heritage institutions who are searching for a similar solution. The project planning artifacts, which include concept documents, requirements, detailed personas and mockups, are openly available."

 

 Complete Blog Post by Stu Snydman & Gary Geislerto Learn More, View Video With Accomplishments from Sprint 1 https://library.stanford.edu/blogs/digital-library-blog/2014/02/stanford-begins-development-spotlight
Karen du Toit's insight:

Enhanced digitization via Spotlight!

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Digitization 101: University of Minnesota Fair Use Checklist Tool (or Thinking Through Fair Use)

Digitization 101: University of Minnesota Fair Use Checklist Tool (or Thinking Through Fair Use) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The University Libraries at the University of Minnesota have an interactive tool to help people discern whether a specific use of copyrighted material would be considered Fair Use.  This tool allows a person to think through her answers and create documentation that can be saved (actually sent to the person via email).  Th UMN web site does not keep any of the information.  This is a tool that is worth bookmarking and using!"

Karen du Toit's insight:

Copyright and fair use!

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Future archives: problematizing digital archives – Opinions – Archival Platform

Carolien Greyling:

"Archives are only useful when individuals have access to the information stored in them. A way in which some archives are limited is that the information they house is not available to people who live in places far away. In South Africa our National Archives are housed in Pretoria, while provincial archives are housed in provincial capitals such as Polokwane, Bloemfontein and Cape Town. For individuals living in towns far away from capitals getting to these places might be very difficult or impossible.  It would seem that a digital archive would be a great benefit to a person living in a remote location." 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Thoughts around the digitization of archives. Well worth a read!

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Combining America's Digitized Libraries, All In One Place : NPR - Digital Public Library of America

Combining America's  Digitized Libraries, All In One Place : NPR - Digital Public Library of America | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries have been digitizing their collections for years, but the materials can be hard to find. Enter the Digital Public Library of America.

[...]

"Part of a series, Keys To The Whole World: American Public Libraries

Buried in the archives of America's public and academic libraries are historical treasures — old papers, photos and records — that flesh out a detailed picture of our past.

Many libraries are trying to make it easier to find that material by putting digital copies online. But with so many different websites and databases to turn to, it may still require a research degree in Web searching to find anything. This spring, a program launched that aims to put all that great stuff in one place: the Digital Public Library of America.

The DPLA has already drawn scholars like Lincoln Mullen, a graduate student at Brandeis University who is researching the history of religious conversion in the United States. Mullen says the DPLA uncovered some hard-to-find documents at the College of Charleston in South Carolina — handwritten letters by a slave owner, William H.W. Barnwell, in which Barnwell discussed religious instruction to slaves and how the North misunderstood the South in these matters."

Karen du Toit's insight:

More about the The Digital Public Library of America!

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Andrea Barnaby's curator insight, August 29, 2013 3:35 AM

Digitisation makes primary information in the reach of everyone.

Darryl Barnaby's curator insight, August 29, 2013 3:53 AM

Digitization puts primary resources in the reach of everyone.

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Accessing historical archives as a disabled user; with recommendations

Accessing historical archives as a disabled user; with recommendations | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Viv Dunstan:

"I recently gave a talk to a conference for archivists on my perceptions as a disabled user of archives. I have a progressive neurological disease, and sometimes use a wheelchair. ...

[...]

...list of recommendations for archivists to improve accessibility. I will repeat these here, for the benefit of any reading:

Would ask archivists to consider how accessible their search rooms are, including the layout within the room itself. This is potentially of great benefit to physically disabled archive users, but a more accessible layout can benefit users in general as well, for example tables and chairs that are easier to move around, paper catalogues easier to access etc.As a counterpoint to that ask you to be more aware of the potential need for people to research at a distance, and do not always assume lengthy on-the-spot research is practical or the default approach, and consider enabling other modes of provision for usersTo that end make sure that online catalogues are as detailed as they can be, and improve them where necessaryAs well as archivist initiated digitisation projects archivists should consider supporting digitisation on demand, including permitting digital photography of records, whether a per page copying fee is charged for such photography, or waived for disability users"
Karen du Toit's insight:

Good checklist of points to consider for archives with regards accessibility! 

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Digitising your collection – Part 4: Scanning and handling tips

Digitising your collection – Part 4: Scanning and handling tips | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Also of interest:Digitising your collection – Part 3: Technical specifications (http://archivesoutside.records.nsw.gov.au/digitising-your-collection-part-3-technical-specifications/) ; Digitising your collection – Part 2; The Golden Rule of Digitisation (http://archivesoutside.records.nsw.gov.au/digitising-your-collection-part-2-the-golden-rule-of-digitisation/)  – Part 1: Project Planning (http://archivesoutside.records.nsw.gov.au/digitising-your-collection-part-1-project-planning/)

 

 

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Judge Says Fair Use Protects Universities in Book-Scanning Project | Threat Level | Wired.com

Judge Says Fair Use Protects Universities in Book-Scanning Project | Threat Level | Wired.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"A federal judge on Wednesday threw out a copyright infringement lawsuit against universities that participated in a massive book-digitization project in conjunction with Google without permission from rights holders.

U.S. District Judge Harold Baer of New York dismissed an infringement lawsuit brought by the Authors Guild and other writers’ guilds, saying the universities had a fair use defense. The guild accused the University of California, University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Cornell University and University of Michigan of wanton copyright infringement for scanning and placing the books into the so-called HathiTrust Digital Library.

The trust consists of 10 million digital volumes, 73 percent of which are protected by copyright. The trust provides full-text searches only with a rights holder’s permission, and gives full-text access for readers with “certified print disabilities,” Baer said."

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Library Intelligencer » The Scholar/Librarian Goes Digital: New Times Require New Skills and Aptitudes

IFLA Conference Paper:

 

Gillian M McCombs:

 

"The digital age may well be considered a golden age for Special Collections. Treasures that have long been locked in vaults and available only to researchers onsite are now accessible at the click of a mouse from anywhere in the world. However, for every stunning rare book, photograph or art work that is available electronically, thousands more are still inaccessible. Some libraries have been slow to realize the potential for digital access and have not built the infrastructure needed to put these collections out into the public eye. This paper addresses questions such as: are we hiring the right people for Special Collections; are we retooling current curators so that they are technically adept; are we providing our Special Collections Libraries with necessary resources such as marketing and graphics design staff to develop websites for digital exhibits; have they developed a strategic plan that outlines their long-term goals for incorporating technology; what are the consortial opportunities that will help our Special Collections Libraries; are we working closely enough with library schools and rare book programs to ensure that graduates have the skills, aptitude and attitude that we need?"

source: INFODocket

 

http://conference.ifla.org/sites/default/files/files/papers/wlic2012/87-mccombs-en.pdf

 

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Digital age takes libraries off the shelf > Ryan Stokes - The Age

Digital age takes libraries off the shelf > Ryan Stokes - The Age | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The Age: Digital age takes libraries off the shelf"

writes Catherine Armitage:

 

Ryan Stokes ... "new technology can enable more people to enjoy collections."

 

"In his own words, Stokes brings a "great interest" and ''passion'' for the "treasures that are in the library, the uniqueness of that material and its meaning to Australia"."

He is also an admirer of the world-leading work the library has done in digitising the physical collections and archiving material that originates in digital form, such as websites."

 

"The ability to interact with libraries via the internet means log-ins will be no less important than in-person visits as a measure of the reach of libraries, especially when the national broadband network is in operation.
"We are only at the beginning of conceiving how we can use that capacity," Schwirtlich says. The amount of data the library can supply and the way people interact with it will be transformed. Curatorial experts physically visible to community groups or classes on the other side of the country will be able to conduct virtual tours of collections.
Stokes says "continuing to enrich the experiences available for free" remains a core objective for the NLA under his stewardship.
Schwirtlich reminds that, powerful as it is, Google does not pay for and provide access to the mass of information resources in libraries, which have always played a vital social role in giving people access to information regardless of their wealth."
The ''purposeful, long-term, methodical, expert work of collecting, cataloguing and archiving'' remains vital to the nation, she says. "The future is tethered, shaped, informed and nourished by the past."

 

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/digital-life/digital-life-news/digital-age-takes-libraries-off-the-shelf-20120629-217fj.html#ixzz1zS744at1

 

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Digital archivists: technological custodians of human history - Ars Technica

Digital archivists: technological custodians of human history - Ars Technica | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Chris Foreman:

Ars Technica"One of the biggest challenges in the field of digital librarianship is simply trying to evolve as fast as technology," Pike said, "because we need to also keep up..."

 

Robin Pike (certified archivist currently serving as a Digital Collections Librarian at the University of Maryland):

"We are the custodians of what has been created and are enabling access—ideally free and unlimited—for the future," Pike said. "No matter what is created and where it is created, if it is important, some librarian, archivist, or records manager is capturing it and saving it for the future. In addition to saving the digital objects, we need to make them accessible so people can use and reuse the materials."

"We are the custodians of human history."


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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Libraries digitise ancient texts - BBC News

Libraries digitise ancient texts - BBC News | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Oxford's Bodleian Libraries and the Vatican's Biblioteca Apostolica plan to digitise 1.5 million ancient texts to make them available online.

 

"The Chancellor of the University of Oxford, Lord Patten of Barnes, said: 'We are very grateful to Dr Polonsky for his insight into the importance of widening access to the fundamental texts which have had a major impact on the development of civilisation.

"By making these collections available online we give the wider public access to a small, but significant part of the world's heritage.'"

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Amid Library-Wide Digitization, Books Keep Foothold -YouTube video

"As libraries around the world transition from hardbound books to digital files, at California State University, Northridge, a massive infrastructure keeps things running. Mike O'Sullivan reports."

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One woman's incredible VHS collection will live forever on the Internet

One woman's incredible VHS collection will live forever on the Internet | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Marion Stokes taped the news for 30 years. Now the Internet Archive is digitizing her vision.

 

"When Marion Stokes passed away in 2012, she left behind a family and personal legacy. She also left 40,000 VHS and Betamax tapes in her Philadelphia home, filled with local and national news shows she’d dutifully recorded for three decades.

Last fall, her son, Michael Metelits, reached out to the Internet Archive, a San Francisco–based nonprofit focused on cataloging archived websites and digitizing cultural artifacts like TV shows, books, video, and live concerts.

Between 1976 and 2012, Stokes taped shows she thought might be important one day. Metelits says there were two triggers for her to start: The Iran hostage crisis of 1979, and CNN launching as a 24-hour news source. She wanted to catch news as it evolved. 

The Internet Archive took on her massive collection, and earlier this week, the first digitizations from the project were uploaded to the site for free download. It’s a talk show called Input, which Stokes coproduced with her husband, John Stokes Jr. The program aired Sunday mornings in Philadelphia between 1968 and 1971."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The Internet Archive digitising Marion Stokes' vision after she left behind a legacy of news television recordings!

The passion of one person left behind a legacy of heritage! Very valuable!

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Vatican and Bodleian libraries launch online archive of ancient religious texts

Vatican and Bodleian libraries launch online archive of ancient religious texts | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Maev Kennedy:

"Website funding from Polonsky Foundation includes Bodleian's 1455 Gutenberg Bible and aims to put 1.5m pages online (Vatican and Bodleian libraries launch online archive of ancient religious texts http://t.co/5Gr817BOSV)...

 

Link to website: http://bav.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/

Karen du Toit's insight:

A lnadmark digitisation project!

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The Spirit of the Archivist and Its Relevance for Content Curators, by Sally Whiting

The Spirit of the Archivist and Its Relevance for Content Curators, by Sally Whiting | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Sally Whiting on "archival practice and online content": 

[...]

"A new kind of archivist

Archives are still romanticized in the way that libraries are: stunning monuments to intelligence and learning, doomed by budget cuts and the fact that it’s frankly a lot easier to just Google for answers these days. Sometimes it seems like fledgling librarians and archivists should just cut their losses, but what they actually need to do is broaden their job descriptions. Applying archival principles to content strategy makes for solid content—I can demonstrate this, and I exercise it in my work. Applying content strategy to archives, however, just might keep those archives alive."

 

[...]

 

From Robin Good's insight:

"As content curators will increasingly need to learn more about archiving, organizing and preserving what they curate, this article provides an inspiring set of considerations about the key value of context and provenance...."

 

Read full Robin Good's insight below.

 

Full article: http://contentsmagazine.com/articles/digital-archives-the-content-strategist/

 


Via Robin Good, Giuseppe Mauriello, Heiko Idensen
Karen du Toit's insight:

Content strategy practised in archives, and the skills set of the New Archivist! Great article!

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Jordi Carrió Jamilà's curator insight, August 28, 2013 9:16 AM

Un muy interesante artículo

Nancy White's curator insight, August 29, 2013 5:48 AM

Excellent post - importance of context & provenance. 

digitalassetman's curator insight, August 30, 2013 5:15 AM

Since graduating from library school, I’ve fielded occasional questions about archiving “as a professional in the field.” Then comes the second question, “So, what kind of archive do you work in?” But I don’t. Although I was trained as an archivist and care deeply about archives, I’ve been an editor or a content strategist on most of my recent projects. And though I sympathize with archivists’ anxiety about their continuing relevance, I’m also excited for them, as I am for anyone who has content worth sharing

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E-informing the public: Libraries and e-government | Library Connect

E-informing the public: Libraries and e-government | Library Connect | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Luanne Freund:

"Academic and public libraries have long played an important role in society by managing, disseminating and preserving government information, making it available to researchers, policy makers and the public. With the shift to “digital government,” in which the government delivers information and services to the public directly through online channels, the role of libraries is changing, leading to new challenges and opportunities. The E-informing the Public research project, carried out at the University of British Columbia in Canada, investigates the shift to digital government and its impact on public access to government information."
- See more at: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/articles/supporting-users-organizations/2013-08/e-informing-public-libraries-and-e-government#sthash.dSDdQpcl.dpuf

 


Karen du Toit's insight:

Digital government and its impact on public libraries!

Part of the Library Connect Newsletter, The Social Library.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 8, 2013 11:42 PM

Digital Government and Access to Government information

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Digital Preservation - Archives 2013, New Orleans August 11th to 17th: Digital Preservation in the Cloud comes of age

Digital Preservation - Archives 2013, New Orleans August 11th to 17th: Digital Preservation in the Cloud comes of age | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Archives 2013 is only a week away, and I am sure that you, like us, are looking forward to a vibrant and informative conference. This year’s program includes a strong focus on digital preservation in the cloud and it’s great to see that many early developers will be talking about their practical experiences – digital preservation is coming of age.

Karen du Toit's insight:

One of the solutions for digital preservation in the Cloud.

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'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives - Huffington Post UK (blog)

'Not Google Waving, but Drowning?': Digital Literary Archives - Huffington Post UK (blog) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

In terms of digital literary archives, one of the lessons for today's archivists is that so-called e-manuscripts are highly unstable, and need early curatorial intervention to secure them against the threats of technological obsolescence.


This means that the writers involved become increasingly aware of interest in their papers, and for novelist Jonathan Franzen, this changes everything: 'Unfortunately, I think that once writers become self-conscious about preserving archival material, the game is over...I also don't see how you resist the temptation to select material that suggests the most flattering narratives. And not just select, but actively create!'


[...new forms of digital archives will have wide-ranging implications for the ways that society experiences and remembers itself [...]

Karen du Toit's insight:

Digital archiving and the "loss" of cultural artefacts! 

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Challenges to a new Digital Archivist « FSU Special Collections...

Challenges to a new Digital Archivist « FSU Special Collections... | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"I'm Krystal Thomas, digital archivist with Special Collections at Florida State University. I am new in my position, just starting this past summer. I am not new to the world of digital collections, but as I have learned quickly..."

"Your decisions might not be as obvious as you think

This advice goes back to the “document everything” mantra but deserves its own line: no one is a mind reader, and no one coming after you will be faced with the same set of challenges, resources, and expectations again. There were probably very good, logical reasons why you made the decisions you did when it comes to a digital collection you are working on, but if you don’t record those somewhere, no one–not your supervisor, intern, or even you ten years down the road–will know that and be able to explain that to others moving forward."
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British Library tracks rise and fall of file formats, by Simon Sharwood

British Library tracks rise and fall of file formats, by Simon Sharwood | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @dhgermany: British Library tracks rise and fall of file formats http://t.co/mKz4Qhyk via @regvulture...

 

By Simon Sharwood, APAC Editor 


"File formats and the software capable of reading them are living longer than previously thought, according to a British Library and UK Web Archive study.

Formats over Time: Exploring UK Web History (PDF, slides as PDF) considers 2.5 billion files author Andrew N Jackson retrieved with the help of the Internet Archive and the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC). All the files come from “the UK web domain” and come from the period between 1996 and 2010."

 

"Our initial analysis supports Rosenthal's position; that most formats last much longer than five years, that network effects to appear to stabilise formats, and that new formats appear at a modest, manageable rate.

But he also warns that “a number of formats and versions that are fading from use, and these should be studied closely in