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Tumblr sparks interest in National Archive documents

Tumblr sparks interest in National Archive documents | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The US National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) has figured out how to get people interested in historical and government documents: put them on Tumblr. 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Worth considering for archives!

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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Sharing the knowledge: taking notes on open data from records managers and archivists - Archives Records 2014 Conf

Sharing the knowledge: taking notes on open data from records managers and archivists - Archives Records 2014 Conf | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Alisha Green

"More than 2,300 records managers and archivists from around the world gathered in Washington, DC, last week to talk about public records and managing the massive amount of new information being created by technology. Discussions at the conference made it clear that the open data community can benefit from connecting with and learning from people in the records management and archival communities. We share many of the same challenges and goals with determining how governments can best share information and preserve access to it.

Last week's conference, Archives*Records 2014: Ensuring Access, was a joint meeting of the Council of State Archivists, Society of American Archivists, and National Association of Government Archives & Records Administrators. Topics discussed ranged from copyright law to appraising records for determining what to keep permanently, but some of the conversations most relevant to those interested in open data centered around electronic records and metadata."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Taking this from the notes as well: "There is much to be learned from starting a dialogue between the open data, records management and archival communities. Both open data and the records management communities face similar challenges. We are increasingly sharing our knowledge and resources online, and now it's time to align ourselves as groups with key roles to play in the goal of ensuring access to and preservation of records."

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IFLA to build libraries’ capacity to positively influence digital information policy through new International Advocacy grant | World Library and Information Congress #wlic2014

IFLA to build libraries’ capacity to positively influence digital information policy through new International Advocacy grant | World Library and Information Congress #wlic2014 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"New grant will help build capacity within the profession to advocate for positive policy change to support public access to digital information in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Global Libraries Initiative.

 

LYON, – 19 August 2014

 

World Library and Information Congress in Lyon – The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) today announced a new grant for international advocacy activities in support of access to digital information. The investment will develop libraries’ ability to react to emerging issues in the digital environment, increase awareness within the public library community of the link between this emerging environment and their work, and create capacity to undertake advocacy activities in support of policy change.

Public access to ICTs, copyright and licensing or eBooks and eLending are just some of the issues being tackled by policymakers at national, regional and international levels, often without satisfactory results for libraries and their users. As a result, libraries can often find themselves having to work in policy environments that are not sensitive to their issues and services to the public in the digital information environment are degraded."

Karen du Toit's insight:

WLIC 2014 Conference on now! Many important announcements and happenings in the library world.

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SAA Sampler: Archival Advocacy

SAA Sampler: Archival Advocacy | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
SAA Sampler: Archival Advocacy (PDF)

Compiled with an introduction by Cheryl Oestreicher


This is the second installment in the SAA SAMPLER SERIES, which features select chapters from authoritative books on archives published by the Society of American Archivists. Produced exclusively electronically, the Samplers are designed to give readers an overview of a pertinent topic as well as a taste of the full publications.

 

 

This Sampler offers examples of the ways in which you can build advocacy efforts, discussing some of the techniques and tools developed by archivists. The content includes:

 

"Advocating Within the Institution: Twenty-five Years for the New York Philharmonic Archives" by Barbara Haws, from Many Happy Returns: Advocacy and the Development of Archives edited by Larry Hackman;

 

 

"Media Outlets" by Stephanie Gaub, from Public Relations and Marketing for Archives: A How-To-Do-It Manual edited by Peter J. Wosh et al.; and

 

 

"Archives 101 in a 2.0 World: The Continuing Need for Parallel Systems" by Randall C. Jimerson, from A Different Kind of Web: New Connections Between Archives and Our Users edited by Kate Theimer.

 

Archivists must continually explain who they are, what they do, and why archives are important to society. The selected chapters offer different approaches and techniques from three books which align with the core goal of advocating for archives.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Archival advocacy. Unfortunately not free!

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Indigenous Libraries As Social Venues · Global Voices

Indigenous Libraries As Social Venues · Global Voices | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

“One thing is that books satisfy users’ curiosity, and a very different one that is that it might represent the identity of the community them belong to”. Argentinian librarian Daniel Canosa questions the role and function of local libraries. On Infotecarios network he writes:

"Indigneous libraries [should] generate knowledge from local and community participation, provide a way of understanding, that in time is a way of building identity. The thing is if what libraries provide represent what each community knows, if what a librarian builds with their community allows a true affinity with people's historic memory. This is not about new ideas, but things should move forward questioning those ideas.
[...]
If libraries spread people's production from their own places, then not only the elites won't be then only ones in the world of information." (translation)

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries as builders and keepers of identity of a community!

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The Public Library Wants To Be Your Office, by Anita Hamilton

The Public Library Wants To Be Your Office, by Anita Hamilton | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"D.C. Public Library president Richard Reyes-Gavilán defends libraries’ growing role as business incubators, despite their tenuous connection to books, literacy, and information access. “Libraries have always been a place for personal betterment. We are providing a space for people to get a leg up on their lives, whether that’s someone running their own business or getting their library card for the first time so they’re better able to tackle first grade.”

Adds NYPL President Marx, “libraries should be providing free access to information and physical space to engage in the life of the mind whether it is a new business idea or thinking up a new novel.” It’s a nice idea. But as demonstrated by the failed plan to gut the stacks at the crown jewel of the New York Public Library system, trying to accommodate everyone in a finite space is just begging for a turf war."


Via nickcarman
Karen du Toit's insight:

The case of the library as office space! Definitely the library of the future! There should be a work-around between the library loyalists and the library as community space enthusiasts!

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nickcarman's curator insight, August 11, 9:49 PM

Libraries are becoming de-facto business incubators, and a few are actively targeting that market.

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Tuning out the white noise: marketing your library services - by Ned Potter #Slideshare

Keynote from the BLA Conference, July 2014. #BLAle14 This talk is all about communuication - specifically about how to make your communication stand out amid a… (RT @deanhendrix: This slideshare on #libraries communications is brilliant.

Via Guus van den Brekel
Karen du Toit's insight:

Key to focus marketing! Good advice!

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Two sides to that “who’s the boss” coin | David Lee King

Two sides to that “who’s the boss” coin | David Lee King | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"... your technology department shouldn’t really be the one making system-wide decisions for the library.

 

There’s a couple other sides to that coin, I think. They include:

 

Sometimes, IT should make those decisions. For example:

They’re the technology experts, and probably know what will work the best for the library. Listen to them!" and more...
Karen du Toit's insight:

When to listen to the IT department and building up a dynamic relationship with the IT department.

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Libraries Rock! | Hitchhiker - Country rocker visiting public libraries on tour

Libraries Rock! | Hitchhiker - Country rocker visiting public libraries on tour | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Posted by 

Mary Kaminski 

"In the latest issue of Rolling Stone Magazine, an article about country/rock band Old Crow Medicine Show references the Octavia Fellin Public Library in Gallup and front man Ketch Secor’s recent visit there:


 

Ketch Secor doesn’t own a laptop or a smartphone, so most days when he wakes up on tour with his band Old Crow Medicine Show, he’ll head to the local library to check his e-mail. “I was just in a library in Gallup, New Mexico, with 25 Navajos,” he says. “It’s communal, like the Greyhound station of the Internet.”


Old Crow Medicine Show, photo credit: Rolling Stone Magazine


Full article here: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/how-ketch-secor-started-wild-roots-band-old-crow-medicine-show-20140721


Also,  a tip to help you know if your library is getting noticed! - Search engine alert service

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great anecdote about public libraries!

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IFLA launches the 2014 eLending Background Paper | IFLA

IFLA launches the 2014 eLending Background Paper | IFLA | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The eLending environment for libraries around the world continues to change at a rapid pace. In 2012, IFLA released its Background Paper on eLending, which formed the basis for the production of the IFLA Principles for Library eLending, the third revision of which was issued at the World Library & Information Congress (WLIC) in Singapore in August 2013.

Cognisant of the great changes taking place in ePublishing, and the varied eLending challenges and opportunities facing libraries in different geographical regions, the IFLA Governing Board commissioned a supplement to the eLending Background Paper in 2013 reflecting recent developments.

Chair of the eLending Group Paul Whitney coordinated the updating of the IFLA eLending Background Paper, together with Working Group members comprising Margaret Allen, Vincent Bonnet, Christina de Castell, Harald von Hielmcrone, Sarah Kaddu, Gerald Leitner, Ngian Lek Choh, Barbara Lison, Mary Minow, Harald Mueller, Denise Nicholson, Carrie Russell,  Amelie Vallotton, Chloe Vicente and Qiang Zhu.

 Issues addressed in the updated eLending paper include:

In acknowledgement of the differing interpretations of what is an eBook, reflected in the vastly differing holdings and use statistics reported by libraries, definitions of “eBook” and “eLending” are proposed.Recent trends in the publishing and distribution of ebooks are reviewedLibrary advocacy efforts with publishers and governments are describedRelevant court rulings on digital exhaustion governing how libraries can acquire and deploy eBooks are analysed.

eLending Working Group Chair Paul Whitney will present the 2014 eLending Background Paper at the EBLIDA/CLM Satellite Meeting,Copyright and beyond: Libraries in the public sphere in Strasbourg, France from 13-14 August."

 

Word 

http://www.ifla.org/files/assets/hq/topics/e-lending/documents/revised_background_paper_elending.doc

 

PDF 

http://www.ifla.org/files/assets/hq/topics/e-lending/documents/2014_ifla_elending_background_paper.pdf

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Addressing some of the challenges of e-lending.

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Editor's Column: 5 ways libraries are using Instagram

Editor's Column: 5 ways libraries are using Instagram | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Alongside universities, libraries and librarians are now using social media platforms to connect with users in a range of exciting and innovating ways. The latest platform that libraries are experimenting with isInstagram, which allows users to take photos on their smart phones, apply exciting filters and add hashtags, and then share these images online with their followers. Amy Mollett and Anthony McDonnellinvestigate how libraries are making the most of this visually-engaging platform."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries are using Instagram!

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It Is My Library! The public can change your mind | by John Berry at Blatant Berry | Library Journal

It Is My Library! The public can change your mind | by John Berry at Blatant Berry  | Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By John N. Berry III:

"Although it is often perceived as interference, or “meddling,” the presumption of ownership by people who live in the jurisdiction of a local public library and their resulting strong opinions about how the place should operate are assets to be nurtured and treasured. Yes, the phenomenon regularly causes disputes about library policies and purposes and makes for controversial community debate. Indeed, library professionals and managers are frequently forced by public opinion, bolstered by media coverage, to operate libraries in ways quite different from their preferred practices."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Good reminder!

Who's library is it anyway?

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RIAA Copyright Pressure Silences Historical Radio Archive - TorrentFreak

RIAA Copyright Pressure Silences Historical Radio Archive - TorrentFreak | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"ReelRadio, a site that streams an archive of often decades-old historical radio shows, has been forced to take down much of its library after the RIAA complained that the site was operating outside the terms of its license. The letter of the law is tight, and the RIAA is insisting that the near 20-year-old site now meets all of its requirements.

When sites like The Pirate Bay come under copyright holder pressure, there is often a big backlash from users who see such action as unfair. That being said, it’s generally accepted by both sides that The Pirate Bay courts trouble by, rightly or wrongly, laughing in the face of copyright law.

The situation now faced by ReelRadio, a site dedicated to the streaming of archived historical radio, sits at the other end of the spectrum, but nevertheless the site is still facing potential dismantling by the RIAA."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The problems faced by many archives world-wide!

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Speaking Volumes - the impact of public libraries on wellbeing / Carnegie UK Trust

Speaking Volumes - the impact of public libraries on wellbeing / Carnegie UK Trust | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The Carnegie UK Trust publication Speaking Volumes: the impact of public libraries on wellbeing shows the wide range of ways in which public libraries can affect the wellbeing of individuals and communities.

Speaking Volumes demonstrates in a clear graphical way how libraries are relevant to four main policy areas: social, economic, cultural and education policy – all of which have an impact on wellbeing.

The leaflet is based on hundreds of examples of practice throughout the UK and Ireland, as well as published evidence of impact. Databases of some of these examples show how public libraries support learning, promote economic wellbeing, act as cultural centres and contribute to the creation of strong and healthy communities."

 


Via Miguel Mimoso Correia
Karen du Toit's insight:

Continuing relevance of public libraries!

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Save the selfie - Arkansas Online (subscription)

Save the selfie - Arkansas Online (subscription) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"Steve Perdue, head of the genealogy and local history department at Saline County Library, is concerned about the future access of all these digital images. “I think that most photos will disappear in the future and archivists are going to have a hard time recovering photos from this generation. I have photos in albums from the 1920s and even further back, but I am not sure this generation will have that to look back on,” he says."
Karen du Toit's insight:
The disappearance of photos from this generation! A sobering thought!
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Narabot uploads images to Wikimedia Commons - GCN.com

Narabot uploads images to Wikimedia Commons - GCN.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
By Stephanie Kanowitz  "Since 2011, the National Archives and Records Administration has uploaded more than 100,000 digitized records. To maintain the effort, the agency is working to develop new technology with the help of Wikipedia and the public.Specifically,  volunteers are working with NARA on Narabot, an upload script to port images to Wikimedia Commons, a sister project to Wikipedia and a repository of free media.[...]


However, archivists don't choose and upload images themselves. They are developing a workflow so that digitized records can flow from NARA's online catalog to the Commons.

They are developing a workflow so that digitized records can flow from NARA’s online catalog to the Commons. The agency has billions of analog textual records that have yet to be archived, so this effort will also help bring them online."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Mostly run by volunteers!

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Libraries and Kindle Unlimited, by Jill O'Neill | The Scholarly Kitchen

Libraries and Kindle Unlimited, by Jill O'Neill | The Scholarly Kitchen | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"In the wake of Amazon’s announcement of a new ebook subscription service, Forbes published an article by a British think tank employee with the link-bait title of “Close the Libraries and Buy Everyone An Amazon Kindle Unlimited Subscription”. As you might gather, the idea put forth was that supporting this licensing approach might be more cost effective for enabling the public’s access to content than the traditional public library in the United Kingdom. While that might not be the greatest idea, there is still much that scholarly publishers can learn from Amazon’s business strategy.

As a historical footnote, subscription based libraries were big in Britain during the 18th and 19th century when reasonably affluent individuals might pay for access to the latest three volume novel. (For some historical background on subscription based lending libraries, see here and here respectively). In the context of the Kindle Unlimited subscription, the reader pays Amazon $120 per year (or $119.88, if we’re being sticklers for accuracy) and gains access to as much as they want from a collection of about 600,000 titles. Critics have noted that these are not the high-end titles found in a first rate public or academic library; Amazon’s offering doesn’t include best-sellers, textbooks or scholarly monographs."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The controversial debate about the future of libraries vs subscription based ebook services. 

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Transmedia Storytelling for Social Impact, y Dr Pamela Rutledge.

 

 


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great to take note of in libraries/archives as well! Can;t just use single platforms!

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, August 13, 11:23 PM


An excellent presentation from Dr. Pamela Rutledge.

Kajsa Hartig's curator insight, August 13, 11:39 PM

Transmedia Storytelling - for the public good.

Jerri Lynn Hogg's curator insight, August 14, 2:40 PM
Great presentation!
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The case for making libraries full of toys and games

The case for making libraries full of toys and games | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
American businessman and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie’s public library legacy was built on a boyhood dream: to acquire knowledge. Carnegie believed in “the meritocratic nature of America,” that anyone “with the right inclination and desire could educate himself” and therefore succeed, and that libraries should contribute directly to that. 

So what are libraries doing lending out toys and holding game nights? Aren’t American kids’ test scores lagging behind those of pretty much the rest of the world? Shouldn’t American public libraries be, as Carnegie wanted, educating? Recent studies, and librarians themselves, say otherwise.

In a study with 70 six-year olds, psychologists at the University of Colorado found that the children who engaged in more free play had a “more highly developed self-directed executive function” than those who had spent more time in “structured activities,” that were adult-led rather than child-initiated."


Via nickcarman
Karen du Toit's insight:

The importance of play in the development of children! Definitely should be addressed by libraries!

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nickcarman's curator insight, August 11, 10:00 PM

This is an interesting article with lots of useful links.

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Medical Librarians Making a Difference - YouTube

Hear librarians share their personal stories and thoughts on how they strengthen the healthcare community through their research and dependability.Filmed at the MLA Conference in Chicago, 2014 (MT @wkhealth: How do med librarians make a difference?


Via Guus van den Brekel
Karen du Toit's insight:

Medical librarians ivd

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