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The changing world of libraries | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project - SlideShare by Lee Rainie

"The changing world of libraries: Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, will discuss the Project’s latest research about how people use technology and how people use libraries. He will discuss the implications of this work for libraries."

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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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FREE EBOOK: Project Gutenberg – More Than Just Free Books, Mark O'Neill

FREE EBOOK: Project Gutenberg – More Than Just Free Books, Mark O'Neill | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Angela Alcorn:

"If you’ve heard of Project Gutenberg, you probably know it for its vast collection of free public domain books. But do you know everything it offers and how to make the best of the site?

With an army of volunteers scanning, proofreading, and editing public domain works, being able to discover obscure works of literature is now easier than ever. Project Gutenberg, which has over 45,000 books on offer (at the time of writing), aims to ensure that no book will ever truly disappear. Project Gutenberg also offers audiobooks and the chance to help get involved in the project.

FREE EBOOK: Project Gutenberg – More Than Just Free Books

Read online or download PDF, EPUB version free of charge; Kindle version $1


 

This guide, written by MakeUseOf’s own Mark O’Neill will teach you:

about the concept of public domain workshow to find and use audiobooks through Librivoxthe quickest way to self-publish your own bookshow distributed proofreading works and how to get involvedsome cool tools and tricks of the Project Gutenberg siteand will suggest some great starting points for your reading."
Karen du Toit's insight:

Guide by Mark O'Neill

Great resource!

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Poly Library to Be a Digital Resource, by Mary Toothman - The Ledger

Poly Library to Be a Digital Resource, by  Mary Toothman - The Ledger | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Mary Toothman

"Polytechnic University will be non-traditional in many ways, but one of the most dramatic alternatives to a typical university setting will be seen in the library. Or, rather, not seen.

When the university opens its doors to students this fall, the library will be almost completely online, although certain hardcover books will be available on an as-needed basis.

Kathryn Miller, director of library services for the school, said the challenge of setting up and planning library services for the polytechnic is a very different and exciting one for her profession, and she is enjoying it. Hired in late January at an annual salary of $95,000, she said it's not every day a librarian has the opportunity to be in on a start-up system like this one.

Her job is to develop and administer library resources and services to support the school's academic programs, faculty teaching and research, and student learning. She will manage budgeting, purchasing and policy development and work to ensure the university's vision aligns with that of the library."

Karen du Toit's insight:

University Library of the future!

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Paper vs. Electronic: The Not-So-Final Battle - by Jennifer Wright

Paper vs. Electronic: The Not-So-Final Battle - by Jennifer Wright | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

A common inquiry I receive from Smithsonian staff is whether it is better to keep their files in electronic or paper format.  The best answer to this question is "it depends."  There are several factors to consider.
1)      How long do the files need to be kept?

2)       Does one format have more value than the other?

3)      Is one format easier to use?

4)      In what format are the majority of the records already?

 

Photo: Jeanne Benas, by Strauss, Richard, 1990, Smithsonian Archives - History Div, 90-877-11A.

Karen du Toit's insight:

The right questions to ask when deciding about keeping records or archives

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5 Things That People Don’t Realize their Librarians Do - Rebecca Tischler

5 Things That People Don’t Realize their Librarians Do - Rebecca Tischler | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Rebecca Tischler, Head Editor, INALJ Tennessee 

"...

here are five things that you may have been unaware that librarians do (just a few of their caps), or that libraries offer.

1. Librarians are teachers. 

2. Librarians are tech savvy.

3. Librarians are advertisers.

4. Librarians are event planners.

5. Librarians are researchers.

 

[...]

With just those 5 things, librarians have to learn graphic design, communications, how to interview, public relations, writing, computer literacy and information literacy.

Karen du Toit's insight:

5 of the MANY caps that librarians wear

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A brief History of Social Media (1969-2012) [INFOGRAPHIC]

A brief History of Social Media (1969-2012) [INFOGRAPHIC] | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

But here’s the thing: the history of social media actually goes back a lot further, and its roots can be found in blogging, Google, AOL, ICQ, the beginnings of the world wide web and, perhaps surprisingly, CompuServe. 


Via ZAP s.a., Helen Wybrants
Karen du Toit's insight:

Interesting!

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Serge Dielens * Soci(et)al Marketing Communication expert @ EdgeCommunication.be *'s curator insight, April 18, 8:34 AM

Qui peut prédire la suite?

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 18, 3:18 PM

Breve historia de los Medios de Comunicación Social

Manuel Pinto's curator insight, Today, 12:17 PM

More a timeline than a history. Useful, anyway.

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20 Years Photographing Public Libraries - Robert Dawson - SFGate (blog)

20 Years Photographing Public Libraries -  Robert Dawson - SFGate (blog) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

I first met photographer Robert Dawson in the late '80s when he was working on a monumental work called “Water in the West.” 

That project is still going after 35 years so I was not surprised to learn that he has spent the last 20 years working on a book called “The Public Library.”

Criss-crossing the country he he shot 557 libraries and topped 250,000 miles in his Toyota Camry. The book will be released April 8, just in time for National Library Week, April 13-19.
Check out the photos above or the video below and you are excused from checking out a book during library week.

Karen du Toit's insight:

10 photos on the blog post! I would love to see the book.

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The Learning Revolution Conference - 21-25 April 2014

The Learning Revolution Conference - 21-25 April 2014 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

We are pleased to announce the Learning Revolution Conference, online and free, April 21 - 25, 2014. Our goal is to bring together people who are thinking about learning from our important learning places: the school, library, museum, work, adult, online, non-traditional, and home learning worlds.

We want to explore and bridge the conversations about learning that are common to these worlds, including: learning theory, learning practice, learning science, learning space design, and technology for learning. The Internet is shifting the boundaries of these worlds and we believe that they will increasingly overlap and integrate. We also believe that conversations across these boundaries are critical to framing and preparing for the learning revolution starting to take place.

 

Sign up here: http://learningrevolution.com/main/authorization/signUp

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Looks like a great conference for Information Professionals as well.

The "conference strands include Learning Theory, Learning Practice, Learning Science, Learning Spaces, and Technology & Learning."

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One woman's incredible VHS collection will live forever on the Internet

One woman's incredible VHS collection will live forever on the Internet | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Marion Stokes taped the news for 30 years. Now the Internet Archive is digitizing her vision.

 

"When Marion Stokes passed away in 2012, she left behind a family and personal legacy. She also left 40,000 VHS and Betamax tapes in her Philadelphia home, filled with local and national news shows she’d dutifully recorded for three decades.

Last fall, her son, Michael Metelits, reached out to the Internet Archive, a San Francisco–based nonprofit focused on cataloging archived websites and digitizing cultural artifacts like TV shows, books, video, and live concerts.

Between 1976 and 2012, Stokes taped shows she thought might be important one day. Metelits says there were two triggers for her to start: The Iran hostage crisis of 1979, and CNN launching as a 24-hour news source. She wanted to catch news as it evolved. 

The Internet Archive took on her massive collection, and earlier this week, the first digitizations from the project were uploaded to the site for free download. It’s a talk show called Input, which Stokes coproduced with her husband, John Stokes Jr. The program aired Sunday mornings in Philadelphia between 1968 and 1971."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The Internet Archive digitising Marion Stokes' vision after she left behind a legacy of news television recordings!

The passion of one person left behind a legacy of heritage! Very valuable!

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Library spaces we love | International Librarians Network

Library spaces we love | International Librarians Network | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Discussion topic 2 of the International Librarians Network is about the library spaces we  love. The country coordinators are each giving an account of a library space that they have visited or belong to.

 

 

Photo: ‘Library’ CC by the Pale Side of Insomnia (From the post: http://ilnetwork.wordpress.com/2014/03/15/discussion-topic-library-spaces-we-love/)

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Very inspiring to see different libraries from around the globe with inspiring spaces and services!

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'Bit rot' could turn the Internet into an accidental Library of Alexandria - Death and Taxes

'Bit rot' could turn the Internet into an accidental Library of Alexandria - Death and Taxes | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
'There seems to be a notion among mid-savvy digital technology users that everything that goes onto the Internet will be preserved there, indelibly, until aliens come and decipher the BuzzFeed quizzes of our extinct race. Among the many reasons why this won’t be the case is this kind of surprising one: the bits that make up our digital heritage could “rot.”
Karen du Toit's insight:
Obsolence of formats and digitised content on the Internet as Archive.
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A New and Effective Way to Teach Archive Management and Preservation - Webinar | PrestoCentre

A New and Effective Way to Teach Archive Management and Preservation - Webinar | PrestoCentre | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The webinar "A new and effective way to teach Archive Management and Preservation" is an online training that explains how to use the Preservation Case Studies for Archives method to assist in the training of audiovisual archivists and other responsible for the care of audiovisual collections.

The Preservation Case Studies for Archives (published by PrestoCentre) are an innovative educational experience that places the student in the role of the decision maker, where one has to balance both resources and constraints. The Case Studies provide the context for teaching the real world issues confronting archives staff and managers in a dynamic and exciting way."

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How do these tools address archival concerns? - BitCurator

"How do these tools address archival concerns?" page matches @BitCurator features too things archivists care about: http://t.co/jqO03ifmq These descriptions are intended to be concise explanations of why an archivist might be interested in each tool. For more information on a given tool, follow the link to that tool's tutorial page (given in the first column of the table below).
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What's the Right Toolset for Digital Humanities?

What's the Right Toolset for Digital Humanities? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
There are many tools available to help academics be more productive, and we have spent, now, almost two years in talking about them. We have mostly concentrated on tools useful to any academic, or librarian. Now, however, I would like to start a series of posts discussing the tools for specific disciplines. Why? While most of you in our readership are academic librarians, we do have some researchers and other kinds of librarians. Any of you researching or helping a researcher find and use information might benefit from finding out what tools are useful in a particular discipline. The truth is that different areas of studies differ widely in what they are trying to accomplish and so in the tools they need to get their work done.
Karen du Toit's insight:
Valuable resource of tools for the Digital Humanities
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Alessandro Mazzoli's curator insight, March 11, 11:34 AM

Tool diversi per diversi scopi. Da leggere tutto ed approfondire

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ALA releases 2014 State of America’s Libraries Report | News & Press Center

Libraries continue to transform to meet society’s changing needs, and more than 90 percent of the respondents in an independent national survey said that libraries are important to the community. But school libraries continue to feel the combined pressures of recession-driven financial tightening and federal neglect, according to the survey by the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project, and school libraries in some districts and some states still face elimination or de-professionalization of their programs.These and other library trends of the past year are detailed in the American Library Association’s 2014 State of America’s Libraries report, released today during National Library Week, April 13– 19.
Sections of the report include: Libraries and Community Engagement, Public Libraries, Ebooks and Copyright Issues, School Libraries, Academic Libraries, Social Networking, Library Construction and Renovation, Outreach and Diversity, Washington Scene, and Intellectual Freedom including the list of “Top Ten Most Frequently Challenged Books” in 2013.

 

The full text of the 2014 State of America’s Libraries report is available at http://www.ala.org/news/state-americas-libraries-report-2014.

Karen du Toit's insight:

The importance of libraries highlighted for the community, but the challenges for school libraries are rife!

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What 21st-century libraries can learn from this 19th-century institution, Angela Tung

What 21st-century libraries can learn from this 19th-century institution, Angela Tung | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Like most library students, I learned about the Dewey Decimal System, the Library of Congress, and the father of the American public library, Andrew Carnegie. But I also learned about the necessary transformation of the library in the 21st century. In order to survive, it was hammered into our brains again and again, a library has to be more than just a “brick and mortar” receptacle of books. It needs to be a technical hub, a community center, a place you might go instead of Starbuck’s."

[...]

Hull House offered a variety of services that seem like precursors to the services that libraries are providing today. Like the Arizona libraries that have added public health nurses, Addams and her Hull House co-founder Ellen Gates Starr “volunteered as on-call doctors when the real doctors either didn’t show up or weren’t available.” They also “acted as midwives, saved babies from neglect, prepared the dead for burial, nursed the sick, and sheltered domestic violence victims.”

+

 

Volunteers “held classes in literature, history, art, domestic activities (such as sewing),” and practical courses such as bookbinding, “which was timely—given the employment opportunities in the growing printing trade,” which sounds a lot like the free computer classes offered by many public libraries today."

.


Via Trudy Raymakers
Karen du Toit's insight:

Thoughts around the Hull House which rendered a variety of community services, the same as expected from a public library today!

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The Future of Libraries - 7 questions librarians need to answer - Lee Rainie (Slideshare)

"Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center Internet Project, runs through the seven questions libraries need to address as they consider future services and their role for their patrons and communities. He describes how project research about the changing role of technology in people’s lives affects the kinds of issues librarians need to address as they experience the disruptions of technology change."

[...]

1.  What’s the future of knowledge? 2.  What’s the future of pathways to knowledge (reference expertise)? 3.  What’s the future of public technology and community anchor institutions? 4.  What’s the future of learning “spaces”? 5.  What’s the future of attention (and its structural holes)? 6.  What’s the franchise?7: Where do you fit on the dashboard?"

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great questions to answer for the profession.

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Q&A: how archives make history

Q&A: how archives make history | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

© Copyright HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News 

The early modern period (1500-1800) saw a surge in the keeping of records. A conference later this week (9-10 April 2014) at the British Academy will look at the origins of the archives that shape our understanding of history.

We asked ten of the conference participants to answer some key questions about archives with particular reference to the period 1500 to 1800.

1. What constitutes an archive in the early modern period?

2. How is our understanding of history shaped by archives?

3. How are archives created?

4. Why were some records kept and others lost – and what can we learn from the gaps, silences and absences? 

5. What can we learn about (and from) the organisation of archives?

6. What archives are you using in your current research?

7. What particular challenges do archives present to you as a researcher?

8. What is the relationship between private and public record-keeping?

9. How can we best facilitate access to archives?

10. What has been your most memorable or frustrating ‘archive moment’?

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great questions for archivists everywhere!

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Trace the past with NY Public Library's Open Access Maps Project - by Bonnie Burton CNET

Trace the past with NY Public Library's Open Access Maps Project - by Bonnie Burton CNET | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"For over 15 years, the Lionel Pincus & Princess Firyal Map Division at the New York Public Library has been scanning maps from all over the world including those of the Mid-Atlantic United States from 16th to 19th centuries and even topographic maps of Austro-Hungarian empire ranging from 1877 and 1914.

Most notably, the NYPL has scanned more than 10,300 maps from property, zoning, and topographic atlases of New York City dating from 1852 to 1922.

There's also a "diverse collection of more than 1,000 maps of New York City, its boroughs and neighborhoods, dating from 1660 to 1922, which detail transportation, vice, real estate development, urban renewal, industrial development and pollution, political geography among many, many other things," NYPL posted in late March on its blog.

These and many more of the 20,000 cartographic works scanned are now available as high-resolution downloads for anyone who wants to visit their site."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great resource!

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Toronto Public Library Now Offers Free Streaming Movies

Toronto Public Library Now Offers Free Streaming Movies | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Starting today, your Toronto Public Library card will score you access to 100,000 music titles and 7,000 video titles—for free. That's because the TPL has Now available at the Toronto Public Library: free streaming movies!

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great so have such a service at the library!

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More Podcast, Less Process: The Video word made flesh - Jefferson Bailey & Joshua Ranger (Podcast)

More Podcast, Less Process: The Video word made flesh - Jefferson Bailey & Joshua Ranger (Podcast) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"More Podcast, Less Process is a podcast featuring interviews with archivists, librarians, preservationists, technologists, and information professionals about interesting work and projects within and involving archives, special collections, and cultural heritage. Topics include appraisal and acquisition, arrangement and description, reference, outreach and education, collection management, physical and digital preservation, and infrastructure and technology.

Hosts: Jefferson Bailey, Metropolitan New York Library Council & Joshua Ranger, AudioVisual Preservation Solutions.

Episodes are available here and through Internet Archive, SoundCloud, iTunes, and direct download. You can also follow via the RSS feed. All episodes are released CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US. For more information, email Jefferson at jbailey at metro dot org."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interview with archivists about video archiving.

Check series of podcasts (7 before this one) here: http://keepingcollections.org/more-podcast-less-process/

 

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