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TED Blog | Design Mind magazine highlights TEDGlobal 2012 - "Radical Openness"

TED Blog | Design Mind magazine highlights TEDGlobal 2012 - "Radical Openness" | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
TED is a small nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading -- through TED.com, our annual conferences, the annual TED Prize and local TEDx events.

 

"The theme of TEDGlobal 2012 was “Radical Openness” — a topic that caught the eye of Design Mind magazine. The publication, from longtime TEDGlobal supporter frog, has dedicated an entire issue to the conference. Including Q&As with speakers, behind-the-scenes looks at preparations for talks and an abundance of endeavors related to talks, we picked a few of our favorite articles from this unique vantage point of the conference.

Below, some pieces to peruse.

 

“What’s the Value of Collaborative Consumption?” by Hannah Piercy - http://designmind.frogdesign.com/articles/radical-openness/what-s-the-value-of-collaborative-consumption.html

 

“The End of Education As We Know It” by Scott Barry Kaufman - http://designmind.frogdesign.com/articles/radical-openness/the-end-of-education-as-we-know-it.html

 

“How Far Should Governments Open Up?” by Hannah Piercey - http://designmind.frogdesign.com/articles/radical-openness/how-far-should-governments-open-up.html

 

“Brainiacs” by Ernest Beck - http://designmind.frogdesign.com/articles/radical-openness/brainiacs.html

 

“The Maker Movement Meets Big Business” by Reena Jana - http://designmind.frogdesign.com/articles/radical-openness/the-maker-movement-meets-big-business.html

 

 

 


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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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What’s New in Digital and Social Media Research: The realities of citizen journalism, and new possibilities for transparency

What’s New in Digital and Social Media Research: The realities of citizen journalism, and new possibilities for transparency | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
How "bridging elites" help on Twitter, perceptions of news by a skeptical public, and Wikipedia pages as newsmaking destinations: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.

 

Editor’s note: There’s a lot of interesting academic research going on in digital media — but who has time to sift through all those journals and papers?

Our friends at Journalist’s Resource, that’s who. JR is a project of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and they spend their time examining the new academic literature in media, social science, and other fields, summarizing the high points and giving you a point of entry. Here, John Wihbey sums up the top papers in digital media and journalism this month.


Via Robbert Hoeffnagel, João Greno Brogueira
Karen du Toit's insight:

9 articles with summaries about researchy in digital and social media research, By JOHN WIHBEY

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10 Must-Read Books about Libraries & Librarians, by Simon McDonald

10 Must-Read Books about Libraries & Librarians, by Simon McDonald | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Simon McDonald, Editorial Manager | simon@thereadingroom.com

"In the words of Jamie Ford in his novel The Songs of Willow Frost, libraries are “like a candy store where everything is free.” These 10 books will remind you of why libraries are such special places."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great list!

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Free Twitter Analytics - what can libraries and archives get out of it? - Ned Potter

Free Twitter Analytics - what can libraries and archives get out of it? - Ned Potter | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Twitter stats packages are sort of fascinating but also not. I look at a fair few because I need to be able to talk about them in social media workshops: what tends to happen is I put my username in, go 'ooooh that's interesting!' a few times, but then never actually go back and check the analysis on a second occasion.

As individuals we don't really need Twitter stats apps (unless you take Twitter very seriously) but as organisations they can be genuinely useful. They can help us understand our network, show us what works (so we can build on it) and what doesn't (so we can phase it out).

For an analysis package to be useful to an organisation it really needs three qualities:

1. It must give you information you can ACT on. There are a million
stats apps out there, but if they don't tell you anything which you
can use to inform better practice for your twitter account, then they
don't really have any value.
2. It must NOT tweet things about that information on your behalf. Someapps tell you useful things - but they tell the rest of the world
those useful things too. I'm dubious about this at the best of times
(for me an auto-tweet saying "This week on Twitter: X follows /
unfollows, Y ReTweets and Z total reach!" either looks a bit awkward if X, Y and Z are small numbers, and a bit show-boaty if they're large) but I really don't think organisational accounts should have anything tweeted on their behalf.
3. It ideally needs to be free. Some things are worth paying for but
realistically it's hard to get the people who control the
purse-strings in libraries to shell-out for a Twitter stats annual
subscription...

Thankfully the official Twitter Analytics, newly available for all, meets all three of those criteria. If you just tweet as yourself, sign in to analytics.twitter.com and have a look a round at the things worth noting; it's interesting to see how few of your followers actually see your tweets, for example."


Karen du Toit's insight:

Great guide to make the most of your Twitter Analytics for your library or archive!

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Karen du Toit's curator insight, September 4, 3:43 AM

Great guide! Also for any corporate account!

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48 Free September Webinars for Librarians | OEDB.org

48 Free September Webinars for Librarians | OEDB.org | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Librarians are lifelong learners.  And we’re always on the look out for exciting professional development opportunities.  Fortunately for us, there are a great many amazing, free webinars being offered each month from a variety of sources, there’s bound to be something for everyone.  Check out these incredible free live webinars that you can participate in:

http://oedb.org/free-live-webinars-librarians/ "


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Karen du Toit
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Great resource!

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Karen du Toit's curator insight, September 3, 1:50 AM

Great resource for September!

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Save the selfie - Arkansas Online (subscription)

Save the selfie - Arkansas Online (subscription) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"Steve Perdue, head of the genealogy and local history department at Saline County Library, is concerned about the future access of all these digital images. “I think that most photos will disappear in the future and archivists are going to have a hard time recovering photos from this generation. I have photos in albums from the 1920s and even further back, but I am not sure this generation will have that to look back on,” he says."
Karen du Toit's insight:
The disappearance of photos from this generation! A sobering thought!
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Narabot uploads images to Wikimedia Commons - GCN.com

Narabot uploads images to Wikimedia Commons - GCN.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
By Stephanie Kanowitz  "Since 2011, the National Archives and Records Administration has uploaded more than 100,000 digitized records. To maintain the effort, the agency is working to develop new technology with the help of Wikipedia and the public.Specifically,  volunteers are working with NARA on Narabot, an upload script to port images to Wikimedia Commons, a sister project to Wikipedia and a repository of free media.[...]


However, archivists don't choose and upload images themselves. They are developing a workflow so that digitized records can flow from NARA's online catalog to the Commons.

They are developing a workflow so that digitized records can flow from NARA’s online catalog to the Commons. The agency has billions of analog textual records that have yet to be archived, so this effort will also help bring them online."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Mostly run by volunteers!

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Libraries and Kindle Unlimited, by Jill O'Neill | The Scholarly Kitchen

Libraries and Kindle Unlimited, by Jill O'Neill | The Scholarly Kitchen | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"In the wake of Amazon’s announcement of a new ebook subscription service, Forbes published an article by a British think tank employee with the link-bait title of “Close the Libraries and Buy Everyone An Amazon Kindle Unlimited Subscription”. As you might gather, the idea put forth was that supporting this licensing approach might be more cost effective for enabling the public’s access to content than the traditional public library in the United Kingdom. While that might not be the greatest idea, there is still much that scholarly publishers can learn from Amazon’s business strategy.

As a historical footnote, subscription based libraries were big in Britain during the 18th and 19th century when reasonably affluent individuals might pay for access to the latest three volume novel. (For some historical background on subscription based lending libraries, see here and here respectively). In the context of the Kindle Unlimited subscription, the reader pays Amazon $120 per year (or $119.88, if we’re being sticklers for accuracy) and gains access to as much as they want from a collection of about 600,000 titles. Critics have noted that these are not the high-end titles found in a first rate public or academic library; Amazon’s offering doesn’t include best-sellers, textbooks or scholarly monographs."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The controversial debate about the future of libraries vs subscription based ebook services. 

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Transmedia Storytelling for Social Impact, y Dr Pamela Rutledge.

 

 


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great to take note of in libraries/archives as well! Can;t just use single platforms!

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, August 14, 2:23 AM


An excellent presentation from Dr. Pamela Rutledge.

Kajsa Hartig's curator insight, August 14, 2:39 AM

Transmedia Storytelling - for the public good.

Jerri Lynn Hogg's curator insight, August 14, 5:40 PM
Great presentation!
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The case for making libraries full of toys and games

The case for making libraries full of toys and games | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
American businessman and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie’s public library legacy was built on a boyhood dream: to acquire knowledge. Carnegie believed in “the meritocratic nature of America,” that anyone “with the right inclination and desire could educate himself” and therefore succeed, and that libraries should contribute directly to that. 

So what are libraries doing lending out toys and holding game nights? Aren’t American kids’ test scores lagging behind those of pretty much the rest of the world? Shouldn’t American public libraries be, as Carnegie wanted, educating? Recent studies, and librarians themselves, say otherwise.

In a study with 70 six-year olds, psychologists at the University of Colorado found that the children who engaged in more free play had a “more highly developed self-directed executive function” than those who had spent more time in “structured activities,” that were adult-led rather than child-initiated."


Via nickcarman
Karen du Toit's insight:

The importance of play in the development of children! Definitely should be addressed by libraries!

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nickcarman's curator insight, August 12, 1:00 AM

This is an interesting article with lots of useful links.

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Medical Librarians Making a Difference - YouTube

Hear librarians share their personal stories and thoughts on how they strengthen the healthcare community through their research and dependability.Filmed at the MLA Conference in Chicago, 2014 (MT @wkhealth: How do med librarians make a difference?


Via Guus van den Brekel
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Medical librarians ivd

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The top technologies every librarian needs to know - ed. Kenneth Varnum / @facetpublishing

The top technologies every librarian needs to know - ed. Kenneth Varnum / @facetpublishing | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The Top Technologies Every Librarian Needs to Know: titles from @facetpublishing http://t.co/PJLGk8JSNB

 

Edited by Kenneth J Varnum

In this much needed book, Kenneth Varnum and his hand-picked team of contributors look ahead over the most important technologies likely to impact library services over the next five years. It shows librarians where to invest time and money to receive the greatest benefits. Their ideas will stimulate strategic thinking and help library staff make informed decisions about meeting user expectations and delivering services.

Highly informative for any library, the diverse chapters include: 

Impetus to Innovate: Convergence and Library Trends Hands-Free Augmented RealityImpacting the Library FutureLibraries and Archives Augmenting the WorldThe Future of Cloud-Based Library SystemsLibrary DiscoveryWeb Services as the New Websites for Many LibrariesText Mining Bigger, Better, Together: Building the Digital Library of the FutureOpen Hardware in Libraries.

This leading edge collection offers an expert-level view of library technology that’s just around the corner and is essential reading for systems librarians, students and all librarians who are looking to the technology future.

July 2014; 144pp; paperback; 978-1-78330-033-4; £49.95

 

Find out more: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=0334&utm_source=Communicator_facet_mailing_list&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=Varnum2&utm_campaign=The+top+technologies+every+librarian+needs+to+know&_ccCt=GqCK7eRmX931soBq1T0BNg_hUSnDuKhXE76qaN2plZUIBOeDaCj9bEVRsmNE3ff9

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future of libraries!

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Director sees 'passive' approach to library fines in past decade - The Capital Journal

Director sees 'passive' approach to library fines in past decade - The Capital Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The Rawlins Library has thousands of dollars in missing items, according to the library’s director.

Dating back to 2001, the public library currently has 3,100 items declared missing, said Robin Schrupp. She said if every item missing was valued at $20 each, that would mean the library has lost $62,000 in materials.

Despite the backlog of missing material, Schrupp said most library users are reliable.

“The vast majority of Rawlins Library patrons are responsible citizens and adhere to borrowing limits,” she said. “They return materials in a timely manner and are respectful of the materials in their possession.”

Karen du Toit's insight:

Seems the best approach!

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Libraries get into technology exploration - BurlingtonFreePress.com

Libraries get into technology exploration - BurlingtonFreePress.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"A maker is a trending term referring to a producer of technology-based works such as electronics or robotics. A maker space is where people have an opportunity to explore interests, learn to use tools and materials and develop creative projects.

[...]

Libraries statewide have been offering a variety of science and technology based programming through the summertime reading theme Fizz, Boom, Read. A $20,000 Vermont Community Foundation Innovations and Collaborations Grant, and a $5,000 grant from University of Vermont College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences are helping to fund the programs.

The Williston workshop is part of the "Vermont Makers and Libraries: Sparking a Culture of Innovation" project, a collaborative between the Vermont Department of Libraries, Vermont Makers, the University of Vermont College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, Vermont Library Association and CMF Innovations."

Karen du Toit's insight:

A great but exciting challenge to librarians to stay ahead!

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Librarians On YouTube: About this blog

Librarians On YouTube: About this blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"... there is a definite archetype that has been established within our culture when it comes to what a librarian is "supposed" to look/act like, and that figure has permeated the representation of this field for more years than I care to count ... Whether it be film and television, or more modern media outlets like video games and the internet, you can find the librarians' profession portrayed (even ridiculed) with the same basic broad strokes. So, not to put too fine a point on it, but that's where this blog comes in ... THE PLAN Ever since I myself (full disclosure!) began pursuing a Master's Degree in order to join the ranks of the full-fledged librarian, I've become fascinated with the portrayal of this profession in popular culture, particularly those depictions which have made their way onto Youtube ... As such, I decided long ago to begin cataloging as many instances of these representations as I could find on the popular video-sharing site. A daunting task, to be sure, but I gladly accept the challenge ... And, truth be told, there are a LOT more portrayals of librarianship on there than I ever could have imagined! Of course, there's plenty of the familiar (i.e. unflattering) stereotypes on there, but dig deep enough and you can actually find some honest-to-goodness attempts to portray the profession in a positive light (some posted by librarians themselves, some not); you just need to take the time to look ... or follow this blog, either one ;) These portrayals can consist of fictitious characters (television, cartoons, movies, etc.) or real-life flesh-and-blood librarians (news stories, promotional videos, vlogs, etc.) ... Whatever the genre, whatever the format, I'm just looking for YouTube videos that someone out there felt was worth the time and effort to post for a world-wide audience as a representation of the profession (either in a positive or negative light)!" 
Karen du Toit's insight:

A stunning collection of portrayals of librarians found on YouTube!

Well done, Alessandro!

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How tech is changing reading at libraries - Marketplace.org

How tech is changing reading at libraries - Marketplace.org | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Today we hear from Courtney Young, president of the American Library Association, on how they're changing libraries.

Young says that it's important for libraries to change with the times, but that one challenge for librarians is making sure patrons are aware of new services. Also, keeping up with high costs. 

Click the media player http://www.marketplace.org/node/147408/player/popout

 to hear Courtney Young in conversation with Marketplace Tech host Ben Johnson.

Featured in: Marketplace Tech for Wednesday, September 3, 2014
Karen du Toit's insight:

Important to keep patrons up to date with new services!

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IASA 2014 Annual Conference | IASA 2014 Annual Conference - 5-9 Oct

IASA 2014 Annual Conference | IASA 2014 Annual Conference - 5-9 Oct | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Cape Town, South Africa, 5-9 October 2014    #iasa2014

Connecting Cultures: Content, Context, and Collaboration

- See more at: http://2014.iasa-web.org/#sthash.o9mYsNfd.dpuf

- Full programme: http://2014.iasa-web.org/programme


Karen du Toit's insight:

Still time to register!

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Sharing the knowledge: taking notes on open data from records managers and archivists - Archives Records 2014 Conf

Sharing the knowledge: taking notes on open data from records managers and archivists - Archives Records 2014 Conf | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Alisha Green

"More than 2,300 records managers and archivists from around the world gathered in Washington, DC, last week to talk about public records and managing the massive amount of new information being created by technology. Discussions at the conference made it clear that the open data community can benefit from connecting with and learning from people in the records management and archival communities. We share many of the same challenges and goals with determining how governments can best share information and preserve access to it.

Last week's conference, Archives*Records 2014: Ensuring Access, was a joint meeting of the Council of State Archivists, Society of American Archivists, and National Association of Government Archives & Records Administrators. Topics discussed ranged from copyright law to appraising records for determining what to keep permanently, but some of the conversations most relevant to those interested in open data centered around electronic records and metadata."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Taking this from the notes as well: "There is much to be learned from starting a dialogue between the open data, records management and archival communities. Both open data and the records management communities face similar challenges. We are increasingly sharing our knowledge and resources online, and now it's time to align ourselves as groups with key roles to play in the goal of ensuring access to and preservation of records."

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IFLA to build libraries’ capacity to positively influence digital information policy through new International Advocacy grant | World Library and Information Congress #wlic2014

IFLA to build libraries’ capacity to positively influence digital information policy through new International Advocacy grant | World Library and Information Congress #wlic2014 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"New grant will help build capacity within the profession to advocate for positive policy change to support public access to digital information in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Global Libraries Initiative.

 

LYON, – 19 August 2014

 

World Library and Information Congress in Lyon – The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) today announced a new grant for international advocacy activities in support of access to digital information. The investment will develop libraries’ ability to react to emerging issues in the digital environment, increase awareness within the public library community of the link between this emerging environment and their work, and create capacity to undertake advocacy activities in support of policy change.

Public access to ICTs, copyright and licensing or eBooks and eLending are just some of the issues being tackled by policymakers at national, regional and international levels, often without satisfactory results for libraries and their users. As a result, libraries can often find themselves having to work in policy environments that are not sensitive to their issues and services to the public in the digital information environment are degraded."

Karen du Toit's insight:

WLIC 2014 Conference on now! Many important announcements and happenings in the library world.

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