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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Closing the Gap in Librarian, Faculty Views of Academic Libraries | Research

Closing the Gap in Librarian, Faculty Views of Academic Libraries | Research | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"In this age of outcomes measurement, many academic librarians are focused—and rightly so—on making sure they best serve students. Yet students are not the only population of end users on an academic campus. Faculty, too, are conduits not only to students but to library users in their own right. As well, studies of faculty attitudes such as Ithaka’s often show that, even as faculty increasingly depend on library-brokered online access to expensive databases and electronic journals, the off-site availability of modern resources may leave many faculty members less aware of the crucial role of the library in their and their students’ workflow."


Full report here: http://www.thedigitalshift.com/research


Karen du Toit's insight:

Good reminder to academic librarians!

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The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries - Times of San Diego

The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries - Times of San Diego | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Peter C. Herman"For the past few years, both the California State University and the University of California libraries have been experimenting with packages that replace paper books with e-books. The advantages are obvious. With e-books, you no longer have to schlep to a library to take out a book. You just log on from whatever device connects you to the web, at whatever time and in whatever state of dress, and voila! the book appears on your screen.

But the real attraction is price. Library budgets, along with university budgets, have been slashed, and such companies as Pearson and Elsevier offer e-book packages that make it possible to gain access (I’ll explain the awkward syntax in a moment) to lots of books at what seems like a minimal cost. The savings are multiplied when the package serves the entire system. So instead of each campus buying a paper book, all 23 CSU’s, for instance, share a single e-book. That’s the theory, at least. The reality is very different."

 

...

"Instead, a library pays to access a data file by one of two routes: “PDA,” or “Patron-Driven Acquisition,” in which a vendor makes available a variety of e-books, and a certain number of “uses” (the definition varies) triggers a purchase, or a subscription to an e-library that does not involve any mechanism for buying the e-book. Both avenues come loaded with all sorts of problems.

First, reading an e-book is a different, and lesser, experience that reading a paper book, just aswatching a movie at home differs from watching one in a theatre.

There’s a huge difference between casual and college reading, and recent studies prove beyond doubt that while e-books are perfectly fine for the latest John Grisham or Fifty Shades of Grey, they actively discourage intense reading and deep learning."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The impact of e-books on libraries and learning. Not good!

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The OER Discovery Role for Libraries - vote at Micropoll

The OER Discovery Role for Libraries - vote at Micropoll | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Click here to vote.


Via John Shank
Karen du Toit's insight:

Vote on the role of libraries in the discovery of quality open educational resources! 

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John Shank's curator insight, February 21, 2014 12:31 PM

1 Second Survey on the role of libraries in the discovery of OERs.

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University of Oregon Science Libraries Back Up Fossils with 3D Printer - Library Journal

University of Oregon Science Libraries Back Up Fossils with 3D Printer - Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
By Ian Chant:

"At the University of Oregon (UO), staff at the Science Library have only had  an in-house 3D printer for a few months, but have wasted no time putting the new equipment to use. At the beginning of January, the library printed a 3D model of a rare fossil in the UO paleontology department’s collection—the remains of a 5-million-year old saber toothed salmon."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great use of a 3D printer in the library

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University libraries of the 21st century – in pictures

University libraries of the 21st century – in pictures | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

We invited you to help us document the university library of the 21st century. From the uber-traditional to the downright quirky, here's a selection of your pictures featuring some of the most interesting designs

Karen du Toit's insight:

Photos of university libraries of the future - selected from photos submitted by readers of the The Guardian

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New Five Good Ideas I’ve seen for Public Libraries (Others too!) – Stephen's Lighthouse

New Five Good Ideas I’ve seen for Public Libraries (Others too!) – Stephen's Lighthouse | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

...good ideas lately so I thought I’d share them here:


Idea #1: Timelapse Video

Idea #2: Security Guard Training

Idea #3: Displays

Idea #4: Shelving Children’s Books

Idea #5: Customer Service Models

Karen du Toit's insight:

Good ideas for libraries!

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New Metrics Providers Help Keep Libraries in the Research-Tracking Game - Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription)

New Metrics Providers Help Keep Libraries in the Research-Tracking Game - Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Jennifer Howard:

"A critical part of the library's job is helping the research faculty "understand and be able to measure the impact of their works," he says. "And since much of their work takes place online now, and not just in the cited periodical literature, there are lots of new ways to measure their impact."

The first step, and sometimes a big one, is to make scholars aware that there is a world of metrics beyond citations and impact factors. Even scholars who are active online aren't always aware "that the impact of their work in those new forums can be measured," Mr. Del­iyannides says."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries playing a role in research tracking!

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Library Analytics – Community Survey Results | Library Analytics and Metrics project

Library Analytics – Community Survey Results | Library Analytics and Metrics project | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @benshowers: How important will analytics be to libraries, now and in the future? Community Survey Results: http://t.co/nEHFpnUIUM #jiscLAMP\

 

Library Analytics – Community Survey Results (Nov 2012) from joypalmer 

Survey on SlideShare here: http://www.slideshare.net/joypalmer/survey-library-analyticsfindings

 We wanted to get a better handle on how important analytics will be to academic libraries now and in the future, and what demand might be for a service in this area, for example, a shared service that centrally ingests and processes raw usage data and data visualisations back to local institutions (and this, of course, is what LAMP is exploring further in more practical detail).  We had response from 66 UK HE institutions, and asked a good number of questions. For example, we asked whether the following functions might be potentially useful:Automated provision of analytics demonstrating the relationship between student attainment and resource/library usage within institutionsAutomated provision of analytics demonstrating e-resource and collections (e.g. monographs) usage according to demographics (e.g. discipline, year, age, nationality, grade)Resource recommendation functions for discovery services
Karen du Toit's insight:

Library surveys a very important way to plan for the future!

This one from November 2012

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Libraries stack up in new digital world | roanoke.com

Libraries stack up in new digital world | roanoke.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by

TONIA MOXLEY 

Welcome to the modern research university library, where new skills and even new spaces are being developed to serve the needs of scholars, scientists and students working in the digital age.

From a digital-ready classroom to furniture reminiscent of the starship Enterprise, library officials say they are developing new ways to serve the campus, and the public.

As libraries transform for the digital age, “it’s an exciting time,” said Judy Ruttenberg of the Association of Research Libraries, a membership and advocacy organization for 125 of the nation’s largest research libraries, including the Library of Congress.

“When university libraries housed large print collections and people had to come there to use them, that was a different model. Now students, scholars and researchers have many options, and the library serves in a different way,” Ruttenberg said.

To keep libraries relevant amid the rapid expansion of Web-based information, Tech officials are using architects and student advisory committees to develop spaces and services that draw the campus into the library.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries of the future! Collections, spaces and services look different!

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Libraries and Learning Innovation and the use of Twitter, at Leeds Metropolitan University

Libraries and Learning Innovation and the use of Twitter http://t.co/J1RlgopeLW #leedsmet #research

 

Although we feel it has
proved a useful addition to our communication
and feedback mechanisms (with over 2000 followers
by the end of June 2012), it is clear that we need
to formalise our usage in order to make the most
effective use of it. As a result we have created a list
of actions to take us forward into the new academic
year:
• identify weekend staff and members of the
Academic Support Team to join the team of
tweeters and create a rota for monitoring
• draw up our own set of guidelines for
responding to comments and queries and train
staff to follow them
• create a list of topics for tweets to ensure that
at least once a day we are saying something
positive
• update our Twitter page with background
images and review our biography
• incorporate more retweets, hashtags and
photos into our posts
• set up a shared bit.ly account and customise
URLs where possible for more efficient linking
to web pages

Karen du Toit's insight:

Document by Helen Loughran and Carly Miller about the use and suggestions of Twitter at Leeds Metropolitan University

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New Report Highlights School Libraries’ Promotion of Digital Literacy

New Report Highlights School Libraries’ Promotion of Digital Literacy | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

January 24th, the American Library Association’s Digital Literacy Task Force, led by the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy in Washington, released “Digital Literacy, Libraries, and Public Policy,” a report highlighting support for digital literacy in the context of school, public, and academic libraries.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Digital literacy in school and academic libraries!

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Academic Librarians Get Graphic - Library Journal

Academic Librarians Get Graphic - Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Meredith Schwartz:

"Kansas State University Salina and Kansas Wesleyan University partnered to create a graphic novel that explains how to conduct effective library research. Heidi Blackburn, undergraduate services librarian at Kansas State Salina, and Kate Wise, associate librarian at Kansas Wesleyan, worked with Kansas State Salina student Greg Charland to create storyboards. Blackburn and Wise wrote the instructional portion, and Charland co-wrote and illustrated the result: Legends of the Library Ninjas: A Quest for Knowledge."

 

Comic here: http://issuu.com/libraryninja/docs/legendsofthelibraryninjasthequestforknowledge?mode=window&printButtonEnabled=false&backgroundColor=%23222222

 

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UI News: Expert on digital archiving and the law, by Kyle Rimkus - Newsroom America

UI News: Expert on digital archiving and the law, by Kyle Rimkus - Newsroom America | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

A MINUTE WITH LIBRARIAN KYLE RIMKUS ON DIGITAL ARCHIVING AND THE LAW:

 

"Editor’s note: In what has been described as a major victory for the digital humanities, a federal court earlier this month ruled against the Authors Guild in favor of the HathiTrust, a massive digital archive of library materials converted from print that is co-owned and managed by a partnership of more than 60 academic institutions, including the University of Illinois. Kyle Rimkus, preservation librarian at the U. of I., talked with News Bureau news editor Dusty Rhodes about the impact of this ruling."


Via NELLCO
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Librarian Publishers May Be More Important Than You Think, by Phill Jones - Part 1

Librarian Publishers May Be More Important Than You Think, by Phill Jones  - Part 1 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Librarians have been acting in a limited way as publishers since well before the internet, but over the last 5 years or so, a revitalized librarian-publisher movement has emerged. 

....

the second edition of the Library Publishing Directory (2015), edited by Sarah Lippincott, tells a very different story. The directory is a non-exhaustive collection of 124 case studies of library publishing programs (111 based inside the US and Canada). According to Lippincott’s analysis, around 90% of library publishers work in collaboration with academic departments and faculty on campus, drawing on in-house expertise to form editorial and review boards. In return, the library supports research from their own institutions by providing an avenue for publication, particularly in niche research areas. While many library publishers (68%) also work with student journals such as university law reviews, the perception that library publishers ‘mostly publish student research’ isn’t backed up by the numbers."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Librarians as publishers!

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University Of Michigan Opens Napping Stations In Campus Library - Huffington Post

University Of Michigan Opens Napping Stations In Campus Library - Huffington Post | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"University Herald University Of Michigan Opens Napping Stations In Campus Library Huffington Post On the surface, college libraries are designated as a place to study, check out books and use the computer. The Central Student Government has implemented its first napping station. The idea is geared toward those who are studying hard for tests but live too far from the library to run home for a quick nap. It was pitched to CSG by engineering junior Adrian Bazbaz, who was interviewed for an article in the Michigan Daily."
Karen du Toit's insight:
Genius!
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Joyce Valenza's curator insight, May 26, 2014 9:50 AM

Really meeting user needs.

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Tackling the questions in 2014 — @joycevalenza #libraries #librarians

Tackling the questions in 2014 — @joycevalenza #libraries #librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

BY JOYCE VALENZA

"[...] beginning the year with questions, rather than resolutions.

Jennifer recently asked 11 Questions (About Libraries) That Need Answers.  And Doug Johnson added a few of his own in a Blue Skunk Blog post. (See below.)

 

Jennifer’s Questions:

How will you make a difference for students?How will you make your work the answer to the priorities/problems that keep your principal up at night?How will you use student data to make instructional and programatic decisions?How will you measure success?How will you connect the dots between your work and student learning?How will you share this data with your administrators and community?How will you ensure your diverse population sees themselves in your space (as well as in your collection)?How will you dispel negative/outdated library stereotypes?How will you grow your PLN?How will you help strengthen our profession by sharing your work beyond the walls of your school.How will you make sure everyone who walks into the library sees a focus on students (instead of stuff).Doug’s Follow Up Questions:What new skills will you learn this year that you can teach your students and staff?What rules can you change to make your library a more user-friendly place?What is your library’s “purple cow?” (Boring is always the riskiest strategy – Godin)How can you demonstrate leadership in your building? What are you willing to take responsibility for?What can you do to get the non-connected members of our profession* who you know connected, changing, and good representatives of the library field?Have you asked yourself about your personal commitment to the field? Are you still a librarian in order to make the world a better place?



Via GwynethJones
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great way to start the new year!

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GwynethJones's curator insight, January 12, 2014 11:07 AM

As always, Joyce tracks down & shares the vital questions and provoking conversations of our profession.

 

Jennifer LaGarde and Doug Johnson fearlessly ask the vital questions.

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The Evolving Role of University Libraries - Martha Bedard / UConn Advance (blog)

The Evolving Role of University Libraries - Martha Bedard / UConn Advance (blog) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By: Suzanne Zack:

Martha Bedard: "It is a really exciting time for libraries. In all the years I’ve worked in libraries it has never, ever been boring. I remember the first time I barcoded a book, well before everything we bought had a barcode, and I added records to the first online catalog which replaced the print card catalog. Librarians were active on the Internet pre-graphical interface, pre-web."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The exciting future of academic libraries > abot the content and the spaces!