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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Closing the Gap in Librarian, Faculty Views of Academic Libraries | Research

Closing the Gap in Librarian, Faculty Views of Academic Libraries | Research | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"In this age of outcomes measurement, many academic librarians are focused—and rightly so—on making sure they best serve students. Yet students are not the only population of end users on an academic campus. Faculty, too, are conduits not only to students but to library users in their own right. As well, studies of faculty attitudes such as Ithaka’s often show that, even as faculty increasingly depend on library-brokered online access to expensive databases and electronic journals, the off-site availability of modern resources may leave many faculty members less aware of the crucial role of the library in their and their students’ workflow."


Full report here: http://www.thedigitalshift.com/research


Karen du Toit's insight:

Good reminder to academic librarians!

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Preservation Case Studies for Archives | PrestoCentre

Preservation Case Studies for Archives | PrestoCentre | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Preservation Case Studies for Archives is an innovative educational experience that places the student in the role of the decision maker, where one has to balance both resources and constraints. Through a dynamic process of idea exchange, students first learn about the situation, then identify and analyse the problems to determine the causes, and finally develop alternative strategies for a solution. Preservation Case Studies for Archives provides the context for teaching the real world issues confronting archives staff and managers in a dynamic and exciting way. The students do most of the talking and are stimulated by learning in a supportive environment. Each case study contains important activities that help guide the direction and focus of the discussion by the teacher who leads through questioning and observation. Students learn from their fellow students’ experiences and perspectives in an exciting forum that puts them in the centre of real world situations and requires them to develop real world solutions.

About the Authors -- Jim Lindner and Mick Newnham have worked as lecturers and instructors teaching archive management for over two decades. 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Case studies - a way of learning and teaching for archive studies!

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"Beyond the Walled Garden" by Michael Stephens

LIS Students in an Era of Participatory Culture "...the concept of the “walled garden.” This phrase has come to represent closed information technology systems or virtual spaces inaccessible to outsiders. The garden is safe from outside influences and those inside can flourish if tended. But the wall is also a barrier to outside participation. If students spend all of their time in a classroom or within the virtual walls of a closed learning management system (LMS), the potential benefits of accessing and experiencing their forthcoming professional environment will decrease. I also believe the skills and abilities detailed above flourish best when learners are participating directly with the wider community. There will always be a place for the classroom and the LMS, but balancing that environment with experience beyond the walled garden should be part of the learning process as well."
Karen du Toit's insight:
Interesting article! Valuable to all expanding their own professional development! Especially people considering taking part in the Hyperlinked Library MOOC #hyperlibMOOC
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Library Analytics – Community Survey Results | Library Analytics and Metrics project

Library Analytics – Community Survey Results | Library Analytics and Metrics project | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @benshowers: How important will analytics be to libraries, now and in the future? Community Survey Results: http://t.co/nEHFpnUIUM #jiscLAMP\

 

Library Analytics – Community Survey Results (Nov 2012) from joypalmer 

Survey on SlideShare here: http://www.slideshare.net/joypalmer/survey-library-analyticsfindings

 We wanted to get a better handle on how important analytics will be to academic libraries now and in the future, and what demand might be for a service in this area, for example, a shared service that centrally ingests and processes raw usage data and data visualisations back to local institutions (and this, of course, is what LAMP is exploring further in more practical detail).  We had response from 66 UK HE institutions, and asked a good number of questions. For example, we asked whether the following functions might be potentially useful:Automated provision of analytics demonstrating the relationship between student attainment and resource/library usage within institutionsAutomated provision of analytics demonstrating e-resource and collections (e.g. monographs) usage according to demographics (e.g. discipline, year, age, nationality, grade)Resource recommendation functions for discovery services
Karen du Toit's insight:

Library surveys a very important way to plan for the future!

This one from November 2012

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The 7 Critical Services All Libraries Should Offer - Edudemic

The 7 Critical Services All Libraries Should Offer - Edudemic | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries are changing. They're becoming an online resource for students of all ages and a meeting place for the entire community of a school.

Via GwynethJones
Karen du Toit's insight:

7 ways libraries can impact student learning > critical for all libraries!

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Clare Treloar's curator insight, March 4, 2013 7:59 PM

lovely infographic and food for thought.

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Are we meeting the needs of student users in academic libraries? | American Libraries Magazine

Are we meeting the needs of student users in academic libraries? | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
- “Meeting the Needs of Student Users in Academic Libraries: Reaching Across the Great Divide,” published by Chandos Publishing and available through ALA Neal-Schuman, takes an honest look at learning commons in academic libraries and discusses what is working and what is not.

To evaluate their findings, authors Michele Crump and LeiLani Freund examine the measurement tools that libraries have used to evaluate usage and satisfaction, including contemporary anthropological studies that provide a more detailed view of students’ approach to research. They take a candid look at these redesigns and ask if improvements have lived up to expectations of increased service and user satisfaction. Including many actual survey questions and answers, this book will help academic librarians and administrators provide better services to student users.

 

Book available here: http://www.neal-schuman.com/mtnos

Karen du Toit's insight:

Good to read to enhance services, especially in academic libraries

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Librarians move to fill void for 'digital natives', By Katrina Clarke

Librarians move to fill void for 'digital natives', By Katrina Clarke | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The University of Western Ontario - Western provides the best student experience among Canada's leading research-intensive universities.

 

University-age students today are sometimes referred to as ‘digital natives’ – a group of people who have grown up with the Internet. But many young people are unsure of how to use computers and the Internet beyond social media or web-browsing purposes. Librarians are now helping students fill this digital void.

 

Libraries are looking to teach students how to optimize research and many now offer workshops on how to make sense of the information they find.  Librarians provide instruction on how to search efficiently within academic databases, using simple tricks such as adding brackets and asterisks to narrow down searches.

 

Nowadays, it’s important to recognize not all students are tech-savvy and for libraries to have support services for students through liaison librarians. These librarians spend time in research-intensive classes introducing students to the library resources available to them.

 

Read more here:  http://communications.uwo.ca/western_news/stories/2012/November/librarians_move_to_fill_void_for_digital_natives.html


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
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Digital Citizenship, by Andrew Churches

Digital Citizenship, by Andrew Churches | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Global Digital Citizenship is a critical element of any teaching program at any level. Our students are connected. Irrespective of the age of the student, they are wired. We are seeing devices reducing in cost, increasing in availability, and entering most classrooms and almost every school."

 

[...]

"...how do we teach Global Digital Citizenship, a fluency that is critical at all levels of education?

1. Clarity and rationale—Whether we are giving the students guidelines (my personal preference) or sets of rules, there must be clarity and a transparent rationale behind the statements we make."

2. Understanding and Purpose—This is the communication aspect with the students and the community. You have to develop and instill in the students an understanding of WHY we are making these recommendations and setting these expectations.

3. Monitoring and consequences—As critical as rationale and purpose, monitoring and consequences should be transparent, timely, and appropriate.

4. Individual and community involvement—In developing and implementing our digital citizenship guidelines and processes we sought, valued, and used feedback from staff, students, and the community."
 

 

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Joint Libraries: Models That Work

Joint Libraries: Models That Work | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Claire B. Gunnels, Susan E. Green, and Patricia M. Butler:

"A public/community college joint-use library is an especially good combination. The missions and the service populations are similar enough to provide significant overlap and allow for excellent services to all users. For example, community college students find that the public library’s collections of materials and resources meet many of their academic needs and provide an excellent complement to the materials owned by the college. Likewise, community college students respond well to the friendly service orientation provided by a well-trained public library reference staff. I think that other combinations, such as a high school/PL or university/PL joint-use library, present additional challenges to good service that we do not face."


Via Afroditi Fragkou
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Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes… and no. | Impact of Social Sciences

Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes… and no. | Impact of Social Sciences | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Many librarians are still unwilling to fully embrace Google Scholar as a resource. Michelle C. Hamilton, Margaret M. Janz and Alexandra Hauser investigate whether Google Scholar has the accuracy, authority and currency to be trustworthy enough for scholars."


Via University of Nicosia Library
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Helicopter Librarians: Expect the Unexpected | Backtalk - Library Journal

Helicopter Librarians: Expect the Unexpected | Backtalk - Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Felicia A. Smith:

"Current students have different expectations and are used to a greater level of support. This is an opportunity to transform the profession regardless of emerging technology trends or fiscal constraints. This Helicopter Librarians approach does not require intensive training; that is why I do not include any checklists to follow. I am not developing any metrics; and I am not advocating for data-driven anything! This is a holistic approach to a human interaction based on individuality and genuine compassion.
A study based on the 2007 National Survey of Student Engagement reports that, contrary to popular belief; children of Helicopter Parents excelled in deeper learning activities and reported higher levels of educational gains as well as greater satisfaction with their college experience. The prevailing perception of Helicopter Parents is that their over-involvement is detrimental to their child’s growth. However, such support appeared to be welcomed by most students and actually beneficial to their overall well-being. Thus the first positive attribute of Helicopter Parents is the fact that they are sincerely concerned with the success of their children. This genuine concern has to be shared by Helicopter Librarians."

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