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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Loss of Librarians Devastating to Science and Knowledge in Canada - Erika Thorkelson

Loss of Librarians Devastating to Science and Knowledge in Canada - Erika Thorkelson | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"It has been a difficult few years for the curators of knowledge in Canada. While the scientific community is still reeling from the loss of seven of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans' eleven libraries, news has broken that scientists with Health Canada were left scrambling for resources after the outsourcing and then closure of their main library.

In January CBC news uncovered a report from a consultant hired by the federal government cataloguing mistakes in the government’s handling of the closure. "Staff requests have dropped 90 per cent over in-house service levels prior to the outsource. This statistic has been heralded as a cost savings by senior HC [Health Canada] management," the report said.

"However, HC scientists have repeatedly said during the interview process that the decrease is because the information has become inaccessible — either it cannot arrive in due time, or it is unaffordable due to the fee structure in place."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Horrified to hear about the situation!

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The Busy Librarian's Guide to Information Literacy in Science and Engineering

The Busy Librarian's Guide to Information Literacy in Science and Engineering | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"CRL announces the publication of The Busy Librarian’s Guide to Information Literacy in Science and Engineering, edited by Katherine O’Clair and Jeanne Davidson.

The Busy Librarian’s Guide to Information Literacy in Science and Engineering provides a practical guide for librarians responsible for science, engineering and/or technology information literacy instruction to understand and apply the ACRL Information Literacy Standards for Science and Engineering/Technology into curriculum design and ongoing instruction. Edited by science and engineering librarians Katherine O’Clair and Jeanne Davidson, the book highlights unique needs and challenges for information literacy instruction within science/engineering curricula."

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Library Intelligencer » The Scholar/Librarian Goes Digital: New Times Require New Skills and Aptitudes

IFLA Conference Paper:

 

Gillian M McCombs:

 

"The digital age may well be considered a golden age for Special Collections. Treasures that have long been locked in vaults and available only to researchers onsite are now accessible at the click of a mouse from anywhere in the world. However, for every stunning rare book, photograph or art work that is available electronically, thousands more are still inaccessible. Some libraries have been slow to realize the potential for digital access and have not built the infrastructure needed to put these collections out into the public eye. This paper addresses questions such as: are we hiring the right people for Special Collections; are we retooling current curators so that they are technically adept; are we providing our Special Collections Libraries with necessary resources such as marketing and graphics design staff to develop websites for digital exhibits; have they developed a strategic plan that outlines their long-term goals for incorporating technology; what are the consortial opportunities that will help our Special Collections Libraries; are we working closely enough with library schools and rare book programs to ensure that graduates have the skills, aptitude and attitude that we need?"

source: INFODocket

 

http://conference.ifla.org/sites/default/files/files/papers/wlic2012/87-mccombs-en.pdf

 

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A New Age for Librarianship? by Sally Gore / Medical Library Association annual meeting in Seattle

A New Age for Librarianship? by Sally Gore / Medical Library Association annual meeting in Seattle | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Submitted by Sally Gore, Head, Research & Scholarly Communications Services, Lamar Soutter Library, UMass Medical School and Chair-Elect for NAHSL] Thank you to the Professional Development Co...

 

"I believe, we’re seeing what I’ve come to call the Postmodern Age of Librarianship. In other words, those things that once defined us and our reality are shifting. They are being deconstructed and put back together in ways that are deeply dependent upon the resources available to us in our particular institutions. Similarly, they are being shaped by the environments in which our libraries sit. The priorities, budgets, faculty, researchers and administrators of our respective institutions drive what we do. To some extent, this has always been the case, but the pressure seems at a higher level today than in years past.

We talk a lot about “emerging roles” in health sciences librarianship. One thing I’ve noticed is that in our discussions, we often focus on some area, one or two specific new roles, like data management planning in eScience or knowledge management in hospital libraries. I’m not arguing that examining, proposing, and training librarians for these areas isn’t warranted, but I do worry, based up what I observed at MLA, that a top-down approach to defining our services might not work in the future. Heck, it might not be working now! What I saw at MLA is that the most successful programs and services are those that are sprouting from the ground up; those that develop from the melding of the interests, skills and expertise of a library’s staff with the needs of its patrons."


Via Miguel Mimoso Correia
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Embedded Librarians in Special Libraries | Unlimited Priorities

Embedded Librarians in Special Libraries | Unlimited Priorities | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by JD Thomas:

"Despite budget cuts and other challenges facing libraries of all types there is room to grow and reach new levels of efficiency. As the library world comes together in Chicago next week for SLA 2012 Annual Conference & INFO Expo http://sla2012.sla.org/ people will be talking about Embedded Librarianship."

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Digitization 101: Is now the time for librarians?

Digitization 101: Is now the time for librarians? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Jill Hurst-Wahl:

New librarians are entering the job market fresh from receiving their master's degree (MLIS). The months and years spent in the classroom are behind them and they are anxious for the next chapter of their lives to begin.

 

[...]This is the time for librarians!"


Via nickcarman
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A Tribute to Special Libraries and Collections: NPR Library

A Tribute to Special Libraries and Collections: NPR Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Catherine:  

"Special libraries are found within many different types of organizations, such as broadcast networks. Many have internal libraries and librarians which provide archival, research, information retrieval and reference services. These library collections are often closed to the public, focused on serving the needs of direct staff and affiliates. Librarianship within media organizations is a fascinating part of special libraries. In an article from American Journalism Review, in 1995, the 'news librarian' was described as, "the collectors, managers, and re-distributors of the organization's primary product, information. This is critical in all stages of information's flow through the organization – initial information gathering for use in news reporting, in the collection of the news product into databases, in the repackaging of information created by the organization into new products." Much has changed in the industry in the last fifteen years, however the role of collector and manager of the organization's content is still a vital one.

NPR is a non-profit privately and publicly funded membership media organization. The content produced by NPR is nationally syndicated to over 900 public radio stations in the United States. The NPR library does not have a publicly accessible website, as their collections are not available for circulation and reference outside of NPR affiliated patrons. The collection consists of archival audio of NPR produced shows, collections of commercial music and spoken word (films, tv shows, speeches, poetry). Library staff do have a twitter account that is well worth following. The tweets often highlight stories on the NPR website such as this one about the The Most Gigantal, Behemothian Thesaurus In The World"

 

- Includes links to all related websites of NPR.

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What academic librarians do…. | The Search Principle blog > health librarians

What academic librarians do…. | The Search Principle blog > health librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Dean Giustini

"Health librarians assume a number of important roles within the university and academic health community. For example, they evaluate, collect and curate print and electronic resources for the purposes of delivering reference and information services to their users. They evaluate the information needs of users. They are responsible for the provision of liaison – face-to-face & digital for a variety of disciplines and professions. They provide expertise in the area of systematic review searching. They monitor information trends such as data curation, data visualization and social network analysis. They teach courses and workshops on a range of information technology topics to academics, clinicians and health care managers. Even though health professionals are increasingly self-sufficient in locating information, due to easy access to information on the web via search engines, and because health librarians have increased their teaching in information literacy, there is still much teaching to be provided. With so much information, some concern has been expressed that health librarians are not teaching the necessary skills for users to be self-reliant. Health librarians need to do some creative strategic planning to assess these deficits."

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Special Librarians and Information Professionals Discuss Social Media, Apps and Other Tech Tools at the OLA Super Conference

Special Librarians and Information Professionals Discuss Social Media, Apps and Other Tech Tools at the OLA Super Conference | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Mimi Szeto

"While most librarians don’t turn to Facebook to look up murder victims and research torture stories, Astrid Lange does. Lange is a news librarian who heads the Library and Research Services at the Toronto Star. “Most users don’t know how to use privacy settings,” she told a group of information professionals last Wednesday at the OLA Super Conference 2012.

Lange was one of five speakers of “In The Now: How Special Libraries & Librarians are Using the Latest in Technology,” the pre-conference session hosted by the T-SLIS Network in Toronto.

The event brought together special librarians and non-traditional information professionals to share new tools and tactics to better serve their clients. Hot topics included social media monitoring, digital devices and building library services for tech-savvy users."

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The three main types of library

The three main types of library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The Indexer:

"Libraries the whole world over are under threat, mainly because the people who fund them are under the mistaken impression that they are no longer needed in the age of the Internet. I used to be a full-time librarian, but I lost my job in 2002 for that very reason. The company that employed me took the view that because it was "all on the Internet" there was no reason why they should employ somebody to do what everybody could do for themselves from their desktop.

 

Not surprisingly, we librarians have a different take on the matter. We believe that libraries and librarians are hugely important and will continue to be so. Indeed, the ironic thing is that the availability of information via the World Wide Web makes us even more important and vital!

 

We want to dispel a few misconceptions and make more converts to the cause, not just because we want to keep our jobs, but because we don't want people to miss out on the benefits that libraries can bring.

 

First of all, what do you understand by the word Library? Do you appreciate just how wide-ranging libraries are? For starters, there are three main types of library, which I shall outline in the rest of this hub."

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Applications now open for #librarians to network: new round begins March 2014 #InterLibNet @InterLibNet

Applications now open for #librarians to network: new round begins March 2014 #InterLibNet @InterLibNet | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Want to build your professional network and learn about librarianship around the world? Love the idea of professional travel but just don’t have the budget? The International Librarians Network (ILN) is for you.

The ILN peer mentoring program is a facilitated program aimed at helping librarians develop international networks. We are pleased to announce the next round of this popular program will commence in March 2014.

Applications for the next round of partnerships are now open and close at midnight on Thursday 20thof February 2014."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great way to network with other librarians around the world! I am signing up for the third time!

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Librarians: The First Data Scientists

Librarians: The First Data Scientists. Data is big – and it's getting even bigger. Every day, we create 2.5 quintillian bytes of data – so much that 90% of the data in the world today has been created in the last two years alone.

 

"Librarians and research services staff were the first data specialists, trained to locate, compile, analyze, and summarize large volumes of data. Any organization would do well to harness the brain power and honed skills of a library and research services team. Companies should take care to explore all of their options when searching for data specialists; utilizing the robust capabilities of a Library & Research Services department may just be the competitive edge everyone is looking for."

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What can librarians/info pros do for your business? | NKS Info Services

"What can a librarian or information professional by any other name do for your business? Besides the tradtional research, print and electronic collection management, knowledge management, and so on? 

[...] 

- publish articles in industry venues that advance recognition of your business and/or issues of importance to you,
- provide data management, data curation, and project management in support of helping you and your business to build on its own knowledge base and/or meet federal agency expectations for research management , if you receive federal funding for said research,
- offer GIS mapping of data and other information visualization skills,
- educate your staff by offering brown bag seminars, webinars, and other events on various timely topics,
- deliver regular industry-related news in various easy-to-digest formats for busy staff and managers,
- add great value to your technology committees or other IT-committees (think of the experience your librarian/info pro has with online research tools, electronic subscriptions, software tools, and the information-seeking needs of your staff),
and so much more!"

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The Key Role of Librarians in Knowledge Management « Legal Current

The Key Role of Librarians in Knowledge Management « Legal Current | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The Key Role of Librarians in Knowledge Management http://t.co/lXh0JS6t...

 

Gretchen DeSutter: 

"As firms strive for greater efficiency and delivering greater value to clients, knowledge management system can help firms by streamlining search.

Because of their skill set and experience, librarians are uniquely positioned to help firms get the most out of their knowledge management systems. According to the 2011 ALM Law Librarian "Survey, 57 percent are playing a more active role in KM than three years ago."

In the end, it’s all about placing the right information into the user’s hands at the right time and in the right format. Librarians know how to do that better than anyone, and those skills can make the difference in helping their firms realize the full benefits of knowledge management.

Stop by booth #922 at the AALL National Conference and see what’s new in knowledge management."

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Challenges for academic libraries in difficult economic times | Research Information Network

Challenges for academic libraries in difficult economic times | Research Information Network | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Challenges for academic libraries in difficult economic times | Research Information Network http://t.co/BZKYMMTA...

 

"A new guide from the Research Information Network focuses on how academic librarians are experiencing and responding to financial cuts in the current economic climate.

Based upon data gathered in the UK and internationally, and focus groups with senior librarians during late 2009, the guide looks at the financial position of libraries, their strategies for dealing with challenging economic circumstances, and the value of libraries.

After a decade of growth in budgets and services, academic librarians now expect a sustained period of cuts over the next three to five years. The scale of these cuts means librarians are having to reconsider the kinds and levels of service they can provide in support of their universities missions.

This guide shows how librarians are responding to the issues of balancing expenditure between information resources and staffing and how they plan to sustain levels of service, as well as developing new services to meet new needs. It demonstrates that library directors need the support of senior managers across the higher education sector, as well as from publishers and other information providers, to help address the challenges, as well as the opportunities, faced.

The guide is available to download from the link below, along with a short two-page briefing. Hard copies are also available to order to distribute to colleagues, email contact@rin.ac.ukz"

 

Guide: http://www.rin.ac.uk/system/files/attachments/Challenges-for-libraries-FINAL-March10.pdf

 

Briefing: http://www.rin.ac.uk/system/files/attachments/challenges-for-libraries-flyer-screen-March10.pdf

 

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Special Collections Librarianship: a Brief Map of the Field by Katie Birkwood - Slideshare

Presentation about special collections librarianship compiled for the CILIP New Professionals Day 2012 (11 May, London).

 

This presentation is all about special collections, what they are, the functions of a special collections librarian, how to get into special collections, and the role of special collections librarianship.


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
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A social media manual for Canadian health librarians, by Dean Giustini > Slideshare

About Dean Giustini. I am the UBC Biomedical Branch librarian at Vancouver hospital. I teach at the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, and the School of Population and Public Health.

 

Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/giustinid/social-media-manual-for-canadian-health-librarians-2012?from=embed 

 

"An introduction to social media

Background This online session is an introduction to the use of social media tools such as Facebook,LinkedIn & Twitterfor health librarians.

The instructors are bloggers and regular users of social media in their daily information practices – they also use social media via their desktops and mobile devices.

Various methods to using social media will be discussed for beginners and more advanced users during theworkshop, which will consist of lectures, powerpoint presentationsand group discussions (and, if technically possible from your location, hands-on learning). During the workshop, several social media trends will be discussed and made relevantfor participants. These trends include social networking, blogging, microblogging and content generation using social media. The pros and cons of using social media in health care will bediscussed, and a range of resources and weblinks to reading and research will be provided.

Learning objectives:

To introduce social media including blogs, wikis, Twitter and Facebook and outline their use in health libraries in 2012

To provide examples of social media used by health librarians in Canada and the US

To engage health librarians in discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of social media using practical examples from health care and health library contexts

To begin a discussion about best practices in using social media in health libraries

Skills gained during workshop:

By the end of this course, participants will:

• Be able to list and understand the core components of major social media tools useful for health librarians and their patrons

• Have practical examples of ways to implement social media effectively in health libraries

• Understand issues in social media implementation such as audiences, goal setting, measurement and

• Discuss the impact of new social awareness services in health and medicine, and engage in thinking about future trends"

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Undaimonia: Defining the modern librarian

Undaimonia: Defining the modern librarian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Simon Barron:

"Since librarianship is a “world made of many worlds” (2), what is a librarian? Can there be one single definition?" [...]

"From librarians in public libraries corralling children and dressing as the BookStart bear to librarians in law firms researching for solicitors and dressing up in suits; from archivists working with ancient tomes to military librarians teaching information literacy to soldiers. We have different concerns, different methods, different audiences, different lives." [...]

[...] "a couple of characteristics which are shared between librarians.

 

Authority and duty."

 

[...]

"Rather than the simple possession of a qualification or a job title, modern librarianship is defined by a state of mind."

 

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Archivists Set the Pace …

Archivists Set the Pace … | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Alison Cullingford, Special Collections Librarian at the University of Bradford:

 

"Special Collections managers increasingly report to senior managers who come from very different professional backgrounds.

Witness archives in local authorities reporting to social services or super-converged university services which combine library, IT, careers etc.

Though this can have advantages e.g. bringing together services with a customer or teaching focus, it does mean there is no common base of understanding as there would be with fellow librarians or archivists. Senior managers are at risk of seeing Special Collections as dusty backwaters and not realising how much management, innovation, customer care etc is involved.

Often Special Collections and archives services are among the most engaged with communities, the most creative and the most dynamic parts of their organisations."

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