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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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6 trends on the horizon for academic and research libraries - eCampus News

6 trends on the horizon for academic and research libraries - eCampus News | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
NMC’s Horizon Report details trends, challenges, and technologies that are impacting—and will impact—academic and research libraries.

 

6 trends, 6 challenges and 6 developments!

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great for the Future Library insights!

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Aaron Swartz and Too-Comfortable Research Libraries, by Bohyun Kim at Library Hat

Aaron Swartz and Too-Comfortable Research Libraries, by Bohyun Kim at Library Hat | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

If you are a librarian and do not know who Aaron Swartz is, that should probably change now. He helped developing the RSS standard, was the co-founder of Reddit, worked on the Open Library project, downloaded and freed 20% (2.7 million documents) of the Public Access to Court Electronic Records (PACER) database that charges fees for the United States federal court documents, out of which about 1,600 had privacy issues, played a lead role in preventing the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), and wrote the Guerrilla Open Access Manifesto.


(Photo from Wikipedia)

Karen du Toit's insight:

Extensive argument for libraries and librarians to advocate and continue the activism that was started by Aaron Swartz in his open access campaign!

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Research libraries in the 21st century

Research libraries in the 21st century | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Val Skelton:

"Although the purpose of academic and research library collections remains the same – to support the creation and dissemination of new knowledge – the nature of collections is moving away from ‘local’ to collaborative and multi-institutional. New forms of scholarship are transforming user expectations for broad, barrier free collection discovery and access. Libraries must transform their approaches to meet new user demands.

 

"The Association of Research Libraries’ (ARL) briefing paper for research library leaders sets out to draw a ‘big picture’ of the future of research library collections.

http://www.arl.org/news/pr/21sttfreport-17may12.shtml

 

 

Key findings – the research environment

- Publishing output will continue to increase
- Global/interdisciplinary research will grow
- The value of personal collections will increase

- Open content will proliferate


Key findings – the future of libraries

- Researchers must understand intellectual property frameworks – libraries can provide support
- Other new roles for research libraries include: digital preservation and data management experts and as supporters helping researchers collaborate even more
- There will also be roles to support the open content movement, for example as publishers as well as IP rights advisers
- Metrics about value to the research community must be improved
- Research libraries will need to maintain linked, digital content in order to enable discovery and future use.
- Resources will increasingly be allocated to the development of tools, an activity well suited to inter-institutional collaboration.
- There will continue to be moves to providing just in time services rather than building just in case collections
- The report is available to download from the ARL website. http://www.arl.org/news/pr/21sttfreport-17may12.shtml

 

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“Spotlight on a Librarian” Royal Society Publishing (UK) interview with Richard Hulser

“Spotlight on a Librarian” Royal Society Publishing (UK) interview with Richard Hulser | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Chief Librarian 
Natural History Museum Los Angeles County:


"I recently had the pleasure to be ‘interviewed’ via e-mail by the Royal Society Publishing (UK) newsletter editor for their regular feature “Spotlight on a Librarian”. Here is the URL if the link doesn’t work for some reason:  http://newsletters.royalsociety.org/q/1N7XofzaQvq0eb/wv.


Topics I discuss in the article include open source content access and affordable pricing to research articles among other points."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interview with a librarian: "his work at three museum libraries and gives us an insight into the challenges faced today by research libraries with smaller FTE and smaller budgets to cope with the increasing cost of subscriptions"

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Fair Use in Libraries - A Best Practice Guide

Fair Use in Libraries - A Best Practice Guide | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"...Hat tip to the people over at BoingBoing for linking to an excellent new resource for librarians, a Code of Best Practice in Fair Use for Academic and Research Libraries, developed by librarians under the aegis of the Association of Research Libraries.

The Code (its aims and objectives are discussed in greater length here) deals with frequently asked questions in higher education, such as:

When and how much copyrighted material can be digitized for student use? And should video be treated the same way as print? How can libraries’ special collections be made available online? Can libraries archive websites for the use of future students and scholars?

It’s a fascinating and very worthwhile resource, which is free to download here. We’d strongly recommend anyone with an interest in research librarianship, and/or issues in copyright take a look."

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