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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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How Good Librarians Have Made Themselves Obsolete to Some Users, By Johannes Cronje - AllAfrica.com


"Thanks to the hard work and innovation of librarians and information specialists worldwide, and thanks to their dedication to free and shared resources, I am doing just fine without libraries."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Good points on how to do research without a library/librarian!

Kudos to the librarians/information specialists who knew and taught the user to do it on his own! That is where you want the researcher to be!

Nothing new that the role of the library is changing and that future needs will depend on staying on top of changing research innovations!

 

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Helen Lynch's curator insight, September 12, 2015 3:10 AM
Interesting piece about the relationship between researchers and librarians - I think we'll be around for a while yet though encouraging other researchers to reach the heights of this one. The author makes no mention of library subscriptions- I wonder if he accesses recommended articles via this avenue at all.
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The landscape of archival employment: A study of professional archivist job advertisements, 2006-2014 | Tansey | Archival Practice

The landscape of archival employment: A study of professional archivist job advertisements, 2006-2014 | Tansey | Archival Practice | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Eira Tansey, Digital Archivist/Records Manager, University of Cincinnati 
Archival Practice, volume 2 (2015)

 

"Abstract

The archival profession has long attempted to define what constitutes a professional archivist. These debates over education, training, and certification have lasted decades, however few studies have been completed on how the employment market for archivists has changed in response to these professional challenges. This study looks at almost a thousand professional archivist job advertisements between late 2006 and early 2014 to understand the current prevailing recruitment criteria. It is broader in scope and time period than other recent studies. Overall, the market was determined to be mostly stable during the study period.

 

Conclusion:

 

Future studies of archivist job advertisements, as well as larger studies of archivists (such as A*CENSUS), would lead to a increased understanding of the profession. This information would also aid archivists themselves, by providing benchmarks to advocate for themselves and their institutions."

Karen du Toit's insight:

A study towards understanding of the Archivist Profession 

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Complicating the network: The year in social media research

Complicating the network: The year in social media research | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Journalist’s Resource sifts through the academic journals so you don’t have to. Here are 12 of the studies about social and digital media they found most interesting in 2014.
Karen du Toit's insight:

12 studies!

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The case for making libraries full of toys and games

The case for making libraries full of toys and games | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
American businessman and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie’s public library legacy was built on a boyhood dream: to acquire knowledge. Carnegie believed in “the meritocratic nature of America,” that anyone “with the right inclination and desire could educate himself” and therefore succeed, and that libraries should contribute directly to that. 

So what are libraries doing lending out toys and holding game nights? Aren’t American kids’ test scores lagging behind those of pretty much the rest of the world? Shouldn’t American public libraries be, as Carnegie wanted, educating? Recent studies, and librarians themselves, say otherwise.

In a study with 70 six-year olds, psychologists at the University of Colorado found that the children who engaged in more free play had a “more highly developed self-directed executive function” than those who had spent more time in “structured activities,” that were adult-led rather than child-initiated."


Via nickcarman
Karen du Toit's insight:

The importance of play in the development of children! Definitely should be addressed by libraries!

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nickcarman's curator insight, August 12, 2014 1:00 AM

This is an interesting article with lots of useful links.

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Who Uses Libraries and Who Doesn’t: A Special Typology - Lee Rainie

Who Uses Libraries and Who Doesn’t: A Special Typology - Lee Rainie | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Today, Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project, is speaking at the American Library Association’s Annual Conference in Las Vegas. He’ll describe the Project’s new study about the different kinds of library users and non-users, based on research that uses segmentation models to show how technology, community orientation, and library activities affect the way people use libraries. The research also shows the variety of reasons why people do not use libraries. He will explore the implications of this work for library leaders as they explore new services and for the library community as it does advocacy. His slides are available here:

http://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/36472925#

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Different kinds of library users, and the implications for library leaders!

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Beyond Gatekeepers of Knowledge: Scholarly Communication Practices of Academic Librarians and Archivists at ARL Institutions

Abstract

Librarians and archivists are intimately involved in scholarly communication systems, both as information providers and instructors. However, very little is known regarding their activities as scholars. This study seeks to examine the scholarly communication practices of librarians and archivists, the role that tenure plays in scholarly communication practices, and the degree to which institutional support is provided in librarians’ efforts to consume and disseminate research and reports of best practices. A questionnaire was sent to professional librarians and archivists at 91 ARL institutions. The responses demonstrate that ARL librarians and archivists are avid consumers and creators of scholarship, and they use emerging technologies to stay up-to-date on the profession’s latest research.

© 2014 Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Andrew Tsou, Sara Naslund, Alexandra Hauser, Melissa Brandon, Danielle Winter, Cody Behles, and S. Craig Finlay, Attribution-NonCommercial (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) CC BY-NC

 

Full text here: http://crl.acrl.org/content/75/2/145.full.pdf+html

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Anticipated publication date March 2014

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Google Scholar Blog: Google Scholar Library

Google Scholar Blog: Google Scholar Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"... Scholar Library, your personal collection of articles in Scholar. You can save articles right from the search page, organize them by topic, and use the power of Scholar's full-text search & ranking to quickly find just the one you want - at any time and from anywhere."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great new feature!

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Rockyourpaper.org: Search and Manage your Research Articles, Download Full Text Research Articles for Free

Rockyourpaper.org: Search and Manage your Research Articles, Download Full Text Research Articles for Free | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Search and Manage Research Articles, Abstract, Citations, Bibliography and References for free at RockYourPaper.org
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great resource for open access research papers!

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Top Five Skills Required for Librarians Today & Tomorrow I LAC Group

Top Five Skills Required for Librarians Today & Tomorrow I LAC Group | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Because today’s librarians must be experts in dealing with both physical and digital information, we have identified the Top 5 skills every librarian must have, or develop, in order to succeed now and into the future.
Karen du Toit's insight:
Valuable reading!
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Grisell Rodriguez's curator insight, September 27, 2013 5:16 PM

yes ''collaborating more actively'' and definitely ''information curation'' because more and more ''volume nd variety of informtion expands'' 

Галина Егорова's curator insight, October 8, 2013 1:10 AM
5 НАВЫКОВ, НЕОБХОДИМЫХ ДЛЯ БИБЛИОТЕКАРЕЙ СЕГОДНЯ И ЗАВТРА
Connie Wise's curator insight, October 17, 2013 3:43 PM

Librarians who adopt these skills will revitalize their careers, increase the visibility and viability of their profession, and become valued as the important information management professionals they are.

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Research Article: “Libraries as Co-Working Spaces: Understanding User Motivations and Perceived Barriers to Social Learning” | LJ INFOdocket

Research Article: “Libraries as Co-Working Spaces: Understanding User Motivations and Perceived Barriers to Social Learning” | LJ INFOdocket | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The following article appears in Library Hi-Tech (Vol. 31 No 2).

We’re sharing the full text of the “accepted for publication” version of the article.

Title

Libraries as Co-Working Spaces: Understanding User Motivations and Perceived Barriers to Social Learning

Authors

Mark Bilandzic & Marcus Foth (2013) 


Abstract: "This paper aims to inform design strategies for smart space technology to enhance libraries as environments for co-working and informal social learning. The focus is on understanding user motivations, behaviour, and activities in the library when there is no programmed agenda. The study analyses gathered data over five months of ethnographic research at ‘The Edge’ – a bookless library space at the State Library of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, that is explicitly dedicated to co-working, social learning, peer collaboration, and creativity around digital culture and technology. The results present five personas that embody people’s main usage patterns as well as motivations, attitudes, and perceived barriers to social learning. It appears that most users work individually or within pre-organised groups, but usually do not make new connections with co-present, unacquainted users. Based on the personas, four hybrid design dimensions are suggested to improve the library as a social interface for shared learning encounters across physical and digital spaces. The findings in this paper offer actionable knowledge for managers, decision makers, and designers of technology-enhanced library spaces and similar collaboration and co-working spaces."

Karen du Toit's insight:

How to improve the library as social learning space! 

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Free webinar on Sept. 12: How librarians are raising researchers' reputations

Free webinar on Sept. 12: How librarians are raising researchers' reputations | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Register for the free Library Connect webinar on Sept. 12 - How librarians are raising researchers' reputations: An exploration of academic networks, profiles and analysis. Presenters include Chris Erdmann, Heather Chisholm and Wouter Gerritsma.

 

"With the continued extension of the academic research enterprise - both locally and globally - librarians are being asked to support researchers and the research organization with new services.

Learn how 3 librarians from leading institutions are implementing data, tools and strategies to advance their researchers and strengthen their organizations' research mission during a free Library Connect webinar."

- See more at: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/articles/supporting-users-organizations/2013-08/free-webinar-sept-12-how-librarians-are-raising#sthash.5ziKKURG.EMalh7Q1.dpuf

 

"Topics:

• Establishing researchers' identity and authority
• Sharing and collaborating remotely
• Collecting, annotating and storing bibliographies
• Developing international visibility
• Applying academic networks and profiles, such as Mendeley, ORCID and Scopus
- See more at: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/articles/supporting-users-organizations/2013-08/free-webinar-sept-12-how-librarians-are-raising#sthash.5ziKKURG.EMalh7Q1.dpuf"

 


Karen du Toit's insight:

Librarians' input into research!!

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New Report From OCLC Research: “Social Media and Archives: A Survey of Archive Users” | LJ INFOdocket

New Report From OCLC Research: “Social Media and Archives: A Survey of Archive Users” | LJ INFOdocket | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Social Media and Archives: A Survey of Archive Users details findings from a survey of users of archives to learn more about how researchers find out about systems like ArchiveGrid, and the role that social media, recommendations, reviews, and other forms of user-contributed annotation play in archival research. oclc Research logo New Report From OCLC Research: Social Media and Archives: A Survey of Archive UsersWritten by OCLC Research Consulting Software Architect Bruce Washburn, Research Assistant Ellen Eckert, and Senior Program Officer Merrilee Proffitt, this report will be of interest to those working with archival discovery services, or those investigating the utility of social media in discovery environments. Key Findings E-mail and word of mouth continue to be the primary ways archival researchers share information about the resources they discover. Features such as tags, reviews, recommendations and user comments are viewed as useful by fewer than half of those responding. However, researchers value recommendations given by librarians and archivists. One-quarter of all survey respondents identified themselves as “unaffiliated scholars,” representing a significant number of those interested in making use of archival material. Full text report: http://www.oclc.org/content/dam/research/publications/library/2013/2013-06.pdf
Karen du Toit's insight:
Survey of users of archives and the role of social media!
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The Hole in Our Collective Memory: How Copyright Made Mid-Century Books Vanish

The Hole in Our Collective Memory: How Copyright Made Mid-Century Books Vanish | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Rebecca J Rosen:

"Heald has now finalized his research and the picture, though more detailed, is largely the same: "Copyright correlates significantly with the disappearance of works rather than with their availability," Heald writes. "Shortly after works are created and proprietized, they tend to disappear from public view only to reappear in significantly increased numbers when they fall into the public domain and lose their owners."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interesting research!

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Academic Writing Librarian: Why I recommend librarians do doctoral research by Dr Mary Delaney

Academic Writing Librarian: Why I recommend librarians do doctoral research by Dr Mary Delaney | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @JMBurns99: Pls RT Thinking of doing a PhD? -see Mary Delaney's post on doing doctoral research at http://t.co/z4YUUJK2Yd

 

  Dr Mary Delaney is Head of Library and Information Services at IT Carlow.
Karen du Toit's insight:

Why a PhD for librarians?

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Helen Lynch's curator insight, September 12, 2015 3:25 AM
Liaising with academics and research students may be easier with a doctorate?
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The new African Journal Archive (AJA) website is now available

The new African Journal Archive (AJA) website is now available | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The African Journal Archive (AJA) is a Sabinet Gateway project in conjunction with the Carnegie Corporation that is making African research accessible to the whole world. The archive preserves journal literature emanating from publishers and societies in Africa and includes searchable collections of journal articles that have been digitised back to the earliest possible issues. This archive is indeed a valuable resource for local and international libraries.

The archive is now available on an easy-to-use website which enables easy discoverability of articles and also enhances the research experience of end users."

For more information visit www.ajarchive.org

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great resource !

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Pavlinka Kovatcheva's curator insight, April 18, 2015 8:33 AM

An opportunity for free access to African research information

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What’s New in Digital and Social Media Research: The realities of citizen journalism, and new possibilities for transparency

What’s New in Digital and Social Media Research: The realities of citizen journalism, and new possibilities for transparency | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
How "bridging elites" help on Twitter, perceptions of news by a skeptical public, and Wikipedia pages as newsmaking destinations: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.

 

Editor’s note: There’s a lot of interesting academic research going on in digital media — but who has time to sift through all those journals and papers?

Our friends at Journalist’s Resource, that’s who. JR is a project of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and they spend their time examining the new academic literature in media, social science, and other fields, summarizing the high points and giving you a point of entry. Here, John Wihbey sums up the top papers in digital media and journalism this month.