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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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What’s New in Digital and Social Media Research: The realities of citizen journalism, and new possibilities for transparency

What’s New in Digital and Social Media Research: The realities of citizen journalism, and new possibilities for transparency | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
How "bridging elites" help on Twitter, perceptions of news by a skeptical public, and Wikipedia pages as newsmaking destinations: all that and more in this month’s roundup of the academic literature.

 

Editor’s note: There’s a lot of interesting academic research going on in digital media — but who has time to sift through all those journals and papers?

Our friends at Journalist’s Resource, that’s who. JR is a project of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School, and they spend their time examining the new academic literature in media, social science, and other fields, summarizing the high points and giving you a point of entry. Here, John Wihbey sums up the top papers in digital media and journalism this month.


Via Robbert Hoeffnagel, João Greno Brogueira
Karen du Toit's insight:

9 articles with summaries about researchy in digital and social media research, By JOHN WIHBEY

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Medical Librarians Making a Difference - YouTube

Hear librarians share their personal stories and thoughts on how they strengthen the healthcare community through their research and dependability.Filmed at the MLA Conference in Chicago, 2014 (MT @wkhealth: How do med librarians make a difference?


Via Guus van den Brekel
Karen du Toit's insight:

Medical librarians ivd

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Why Libraries Should Look Beyond Library Card Ownership As A Measure of Support | Librarian by Day @bobbinewman

Why Libraries Should Look Beyond Library Card Ownership As A Measure of Support | Librarian by Day @bobbinewman | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Last week the Pew Internet and American Life Project released their latest report on the role of libraries in the digital age.

[...]

Rather than focusing on the percentage of the community that has a library card, libraries would be better off focusing on public support of the library and accepting that some people don’t use the library for one reason or another."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Making a very valid point! 

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8% of Librarians Believe Printed Word Will Be ‘Obsolete’ by 2050 | CNS News

8% of Librarians Believe Printed Word Will Be ‘Obsolete’ by 2050 | CNS News | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Eight percent of librarians and media center specialists believe that people will be largely illiterate by 2050 as video and audio forms of communication completely replace the printed word, according to a 2012 survey.

The survey was conducted by Grimm and Parker, an architectural firm with offices in Virginia and Maryland that has designed over 20 libraries.

"The ability of computers and handheld devices to communicate verbally is advancing at an extraordinary pace. Some believe the days of the printed word are numbered and the transition to an entirely oral/verbal/visual culture is inevitable. Others have even predicted the total demise of literacy as early as 2050."

- See more at: http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/barbara-hollingsworth/8-librarians-believe-printed-word-will-be-obsolete-2050#sthash.TaqxbSv4.qpW7HdmS.dpuf

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

8% is not a large number!

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Digitization 101: University of Minnesota Fair Use Checklist Tool (or Thinking Through Fair Use)

Digitization 101: University of Minnesota Fair Use Checklist Tool (or Thinking Through Fair Use) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The University Libraries at the University of Minnesota have an interactive tool to help people discern whether a specific use of copyrighted material would be considered Fair Use.  This tool allows a person to think through her answers and create documentation that can be saved (actually sent to the person via email).  Th UMN web site does not keep any of the information.  This is a tool that is worth bookmarking and using!"

Karen du Toit's insight:

Copyright and fair use!

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International Open Access Week 2013 - 21-27 Oct #OA - suggestions on what to do

International Open Access Week 2013 - 21-27 Oct #OA - suggestions on what to do | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"The 6th Open Access Week is next week. "The week is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research. “Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole. Open Access (OA) has the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year. Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward." - Open Access Week
Karen du Toit's insight:
Suggestions of things to do for librarians!
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Library DIY has been released! | Information Wants To Be Free

Library DIY has been released! | Information Wants To Be Free | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Meredith Farkas DIY website for research at Portland State University Library
Karen du Toit's insight:
Great example of an online toolkit drawn up by an academic librarian for research!
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YALSA » An Interview with the Roadtripping Librarian - video

Over the summer Talya Sokoll traveled across the United States to learn about library services and collections for teens. Talya paid particular attention to space and collections that support the needs of LGBT teens.

 

Interview here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUw729Hk50E

 

You can read Talya’s article on trans* teens in YA literature in the summer issue of YALS, she updated the article on the YALS site and published a list of trans* YA titles there as well. You can also read her Roadtripping Librarian blog posts on this site."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interesting findings about libraries and their offerings for teens in the USA

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E-informing the public: Libraries and e-government | Library Connect

E-informing the public: Libraries and e-government | Library Connect | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Luanne Freund:

"Academic and public libraries have long played an important role in society by managing, disseminating and preserving government information, making it available to researchers, policy makers and the public. With the shift to “digital government,” in which the government delivers information and services to the public directly through online channels, the role of libraries is changing, leading to new challenges and opportunities. The E-informing the Public research project, carried out at the University of British Columbia in Canada, investigates the shift to digital government and its impact on public access to government information."
- See more at: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/articles/supporting-users-organizations/2013-08/e-informing-public-libraries-and-e-government#sthash.dSDdQpcl.dpuf

 


Karen du Toit's insight:

Digital government and its impact on public libraries!

Part of the Library Connect Newsletter, The Social Library.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 9, 2013 2:42 AM

Digital Government and Access to Government information

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University libraries: 10 global portraits

University libraries: 10 global portraits | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
University library chiefs worldwide reveal the challenges they face, plans for the future, and their role in higher education (Uni librarians talk about their libraries > University libraries: 10 global portraits

 

America: New York University library

Well-designed space is one of the most important services an academic library can offer, says dean of library Carol Mandel

 

UK: University of Manchester library

The library is not being used less, it's just user needs that are changing, says university librarian Janet Wilkinson – so don't forget the wifi

 

Japan: Hachioji library, Tama Art University

A university library designed by a world-leading architect inspires and challenges in equal measure, says library head Hidemi Kondo

 

Nigeria: American University of Nigeria library

Open access and libraries centred around online learning and research are key in developing countries, says library director Amed Demirhan

 

UK: Bodleian library, University of Oxford

We need to shape the skills of library staff to meet user needs while maintaining specialist knowledge, says interim Bodley's librarian Richard Ovenden

 

Australia: Queensland University of Technology library

With 97% of its research downloads from outside Australia, the library's open access expertise is invaluable, says library director Judy Stokker

 

Singapore: Nanyang Technological University library

Finding information is not the problem, says university librarian Choy Fatt Cheong – libraries are now taking the lead on how to communicate it

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

The state of university libraries! Interesting reviews!

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Examining The Future Role Of Libraries at #LIBER2013 | LIBER

by Friedel Grant “A university is just a group of buildings gathered around a library.”

– Shelby Foote

 

With this quotation, Dr. Professor Peter Strohschneider, Chairman of the German Council of Science and Humanities, began his keynote speech at LIBER’s 42nd annual conference in Munich, Germany.

 

“The library is a place in which learning and research happens, and in which knowledge orders are created,” continued Strohschneider. “As Foote suggests, the library lies at the very heart of the academic experience. A university without a library is more or less unthinkable. This being the case, Foote’s perspective raises some important questions when we consider the future of academic libraries.”

 

Strohschneider went on to explain how some of the most notable research discoveries can be attributed to serendipity. These accidental revelations can, however, be thwarted by the current enthusiasm for modern search engines which only lead researchers to targeted results.

 

From this opening talk, the future of libraries was repeatedly explored over the three days of the conference – particularly in relation to the vast quantities of data currently being created and the library’s role in helping researchers to manage and sift through that data.

 

With two new scholarly articles being published every minute, Dr. Jan Velterop asserted that structures such as nano-publications would become an essential tool for researchers to identify relevant material. This would, in turn, require libraries and publishers to adjust to a new world where the scientific journal was valued more as a source of raw material, in which researchers could look for knowledge patterns, than something to read.

 

4 Slideshares from the Conf:

1. 

The future of the science publishing ego-system http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/liber-munich-26june2013-2

2. 

Roadmaps, Roles and Re-engineering: Developing Data Informatics Capability in Libraries

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/roadmaps-roles-and-reengineering-developing-data-informatics-capability-in-libraries

 

3. 

A Revolution in Open Science: Open Data and the Role of Libraries (Professor Geoffrey Boulton at LIBER 2013

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/boulton-gsb-presentationlibermunich

 

4. 

Enabling Data-Intensive Science Through Data Infrastructures

http://www.slideshare.net/libereurope/morais-liber42-datainfrastructures-1

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future role of libraries! 

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Archivists Race Technology to Save Past Space Research, Records - Newswise (press release)

Archivists Race Technology to Save Past Space Research, Records - Newswise (press release) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

With billions of dollars of past space research at risk of being lost forever, Dr. Charles Lundquist is running a race against technology and time.

Director of the Interactive Projects Office at The University of Alabama in Huntsville’s Research Institute, the 85-year-old Dr. Lundquist spent 40 years in high-level positions with the U.S. Army, the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, NASA, and finally the University of Alabama in Huntsville. He officially retired in 1999. Working as a volunteer since then, he spends his time sleuthing for past research from the Army, NASA and private papers, as well as collecting oral histories from NASA retirees and others. All are added to an archive on the ground floor of UAH’s M. Louis Salmon Library, where Anne Coleman is a reference librarian and head of Archives and Special Collections. The archives preserve continued access for future historians, scholars and students.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Archivists racing against time with formats becoming obsolete!

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New Metrics Providers Help Keep Libraries in the Research-Tracking Game - Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription)

New Metrics Providers Help Keep Libraries in the Research-Tracking Game - Chronicle of Higher Education (subscription) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Jennifer Howard:

"A critical part of the library's job is helping the research faculty "understand and be able to measure the impact of their works," he says. "And since much of their work takes place online now, and not just in the cited periodical literature, there are lots of new ways to measure their impact."

The first step, and sometimes a big one, is to make scholars aware that there is a world of metrics beyond citations and impact factors. Even scholars who are active online aren't always aware "that the impact of their work in those new forums can be measured," Mr. Del­iyannides says."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries playing a role in research tracking!

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The case for making libraries full of toys and games

The case for making libraries full of toys and games | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
American businessman and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie’s public library legacy was built on a boyhood dream: to acquire knowledge. Carnegie believed in “the meritocratic nature of America,” that anyone “with the right inclination and desire could educate himself” and therefore succeed, and that libraries should contribute directly to that. 

So what are libraries doing lending out toys and holding game nights? Aren’t American kids’ test scores lagging behind those of pretty much the rest of the world? Shouldn’t American public libraries be, as Carnegie wanted, educating? Recent studies, and librarians themselves, say otherwise.

In a study with 70 six-year olds, psychologists at the University of Colorado found that the children who engaged in more free play had a “more highly developed self-directed executive function” than those who had spent more time in “structured activities,” that were adult-led rather than child-initiated."


Via nickcarman
Karen du Toit's insight:

The importance of play in the development of children! Definitely should be addressed by libraries!

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nickcarman's curator insight, August 12, 1:00 AM

This is an interesting article with lots of useful links.

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Who Uses Libraries and Who Doesn’t: A Special Typology - Lee Rainie

Who Uses Libraries and Who Doesn’t: A Special Typology - Lee Rainie | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Today, Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project, is speaking at the American Library Association’s Annual Conference in Las Vegas. He’ll describe the Project’s new study about the different kinds of library users and non-users, based on research that uses segmentation models to show how technology, community orientation, and library activities affect the way people use libraries. The research also shows the variety of reasons why people do not use libraries. He will explore the implications of this work for library leaders as they explore new services and for the library community as it does advocacy. His slides are available here:

http://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/36472925#

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Different kinds of library users, and the implications for library leaders!

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Beyond Gatekeepers of Knowledge: Scholarly Communication Practices of Academic Librarians and Archivists at ARL Institutions

Abstract

Librarians and archivists are intimately involved in scholarly communication systems, both as information providers and instructors. However, very little is known regarding their activities as scholars. This study seeks to examine the scholarly communication practices of librarians and archivists, the role that tenure plays in scholarly communication practices, and the degree to which institutional support is provided in librarians’ efforts to consume and disseminate research and reports of best practices. A questionnaire was sent to professional librarians and archivists at 91 ARL institutions. The responses demonstrate that ARL librarians and archivists are avid consumers and creators of scholarship, and they use emerging technologies to stay up-to-date on the profession’s latest research.

© 2014 Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Andrew Tsou, Sara Naslund, Alexandra Hauser, Melissa Brandon, Danielle Winter, Cody Behles, and S. Craig Finlay, Attribution-NonCommercial (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) CC BY-NC

 

Full text here: http://crl.acrl.org/content/75/2/145.full.pdf+html

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Anticipated publication date March 2014

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Google Scholar Blog: Google Scholar Library

Google Scholar Blog: Google Scholar Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"... Scholar Library, your personal collection of articles in Scholar. You can save articles right from the search page, organize them by topic, and use the power of Scholar's full-text search & ranking to quickly find just the one you want - at any time and from anywhere."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great new feature!

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Rockyourpaper.org: Search and Manage your Research Articles, Download Full Text Research Articles for Free

Rockyourpaper.org: Search and Manage your Research Articles, Download Full Text Research Articles for Free | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Search and Manage Research Articles, Abstract, Citations, Bibliography and References for free at RockYourPaper.org
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great resource for open access research papers!

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Top Five Skills Required for Librarians Today & Tomorrow I LAC Group

Top Five Skills Required for Librarians Today & Tomorrow I LAC Group | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Because today’s librarians must be experts in dealing with both physical and digital information, we have identified the Top 5 skills every librarian must have, or develop, in order to succeed now and into the future.
Karen du Toit's insight:
Valuable reading!
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Grisell Rodriguez's curator insight, September 27, 2013 5:16 PM

yes ''collaborating more actively'' and definitely ''information curation'' because more and more ''volume nd variety of informtion expands'' 

Галина Егорова's curator insight, October 8, 2013 1:10 AM
5 НАВЫКОВ, НЕОБХОДИМЫХ ДЛЯ БИБЛИОТЕКАРЕЙ СЕГОДНЯ И ЗАВТРА
Connie Wise's curator insight, October 17, 2013 3:43 PM

Librarians who adopt these skills will revitalize their careers, increase the visibility and viability of their profession, and become valued as the important information management professionals they are.

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Research Article: “Libraries as Co-Working Spaces: Understanding User Motivations and Perceived Barriers to Social Learning” | LJ INFOdocket

Research Article: “Libraries as Co-Working Spaces: Understanding User Motivations and Perceived Barriers to Social Learning” | LJ INFOdocket | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The following article appears in Library Hi-Tech (Vol. 31 No 2).

We’re sharing the full text of the “accepted for publication” version of the article.

Title

Libraries as Co-Working Spaces: Understanding User Motivations and Perceived Barriers to Social Learning

Authors

Mark Bilandzic & Marcus Foth (2013) 


Abstract: "This paper aims to inform design strategies for smart space technology to enhance libraries as environments for co-working and informal social learning. The focus is on understanding user motivations, behaviour, and activities in the library when there is no programmed agenda. The study analyses gathered data over five months of ethnographic research at ‘The Edge’ – a bookless library space at the State Library of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, that is explicitly dedicated to co-working, social learning, peer collaboration, and creativity around digital culture and technology. The results present five personas that embody people’s main usage patterns as well as motivations, attitudes, and perceived barriers to social learning. It appears that most users work individually or within pre-organised groups, but usually do not make new connections with co-present, unacquainted users. Based on the personas, four hybrid design dimensions are suggested to improve the library as a social interface for shared learning encounters across physical and digital spaces. The findings in this paper offer actionable knowledge for managers, decision makers, and designers of technology-enhanced library spaces and similar collaboration and co-working spaces."

Karen du Toit's insight:

How to improve the library as social learning space!