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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Going Big: Successes Back from SAA 2015 - Archivists responding to climate change

Going Big: Successes Back from SAA 2015 - Archivists responding to climate change | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Members of ProjectARCC converged upon Cleveland, Ohio last week with fellow archivistsfrom across the United States and beyond, sharing ideas, new projects, and best practices on the preservation and access of historical materials for current and future generations.

This was ProjectARCC’s first national opportunity to share news about our work, our concerns about the impact of climate change on the archival profession, and ways we think archivists can make a positive climate impact."

 

"Overall, the conference was hugely successful. ProjectARCC members made new contacts and advocates across the country. Archivists are understanding that the issue of climate change affects everything that we do, as professionals, as individuals, as communities and across the world. We’re honored to be part of this movement to better understand climate impacts on our profession, and equally as importantly, what efforts we can take to act on climate change within and beyond it."


Storify: https://storify.com/historivist/projectarcc-at-saa15

Karen du Toit's insight:

Archivists making a positive contribution to the climate impact on the archival profession! 

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Online Video Presentation: NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural HeritageNEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage | National Endowment for the Huma...

Online Video Presentation: NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural HeritageNEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage | National Endowment for the Huma... | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities is proud to present “NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage,” an online video by Program Officers Joshua Sternfeld and Jesse Johnston: http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/featured-project/neh-and-the-preservation-and-access-audiovisual-cultural-her. ;

The three-part video—which you may watch in full or in separate parts (links below)--covers NEH’s ongoing commitment to preserve audiovisual cultural heritage.  Part I provides an argument for the significance of a/v collections as an essential media for understanding the history of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  Part II summarizes the full range of grant programming for a/v collections provided by NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access that covers areas in research and development, education and training, assessment for smaller institutions, reformatting, cataloging, and stabilization through sustainable preventive conservation.  Finally, Part III describes NEH’s strategic planning to address the current crisis in a/v preservation and access.

We invite you to share the video or its constituent parts widely not just with fellow audiovisual archivists, librarians, and engineers, but administrators, scholars, and anyone else who may be interested to learn more about moving image and sound collections. 

We also invite your feedback on how NEH may continue to support the field going forward.  Your participation, expressed in grant proposals and correspondence, are what fuel our programming and outreach.

As always, program officers are available to discuss project ideas, read drafts for many of our grant programs, and provide feedback.  Questions may be submitted to Josh Sternfeld (jsternfeld@neh.gov) or Jesse Johnston (jjohnston@neh.gov).  You may learn more about our grant programming at http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation. ; You can also follow us on Twitter, @NEH_PresAccess for future news and announcements on this fast-moving front.

 

NEH is an independent grant-making agency of the United States government dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation, and public programs in the humanities.

 

FULL VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFTk6OLctVI&feature=player_embedded

 

PART I: The Significance of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TjWQFOcaGo&feature=player_embedded

 

PART II: NEH Division of Preservation and Access Grant Programming and Audiovisual Collections: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugcaJpcAktg&feature=player_embedded

 

PART III: NEH Strategic Planning and the Crisis of Audiovisual Preservation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyfXXfgxEQY&feature=player_embedded

rn more about moving image and sound collections. 

 

 

We also invite your feedback on how NEH may continue to support the field going forward.  Your participation, expressed in grant proposals and correspondence, are what fuel our programming and outreach.

 

As always, program officers are available to discuss project ideas, read drafts for many of our grant programs, and provide feedback.  Questions may be submitted to Josh Sternfeld (jsternfeld@neh.gov) or Jesse Johnston (jjohnston@neh.gov).  You may learn more about our grant programming at http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation. ; You can also follow us on Twitter, @NEH_PresAccess for future news and announcements on this fast-moving front.

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

To be shared widely, and encourage feedback as well!

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International Preservation News available online | IFLA

International Preservation News available online | IFLA | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Julia Brungs:

 

"Past issues of IPN now available

IFLA is very happy to announce that all remaining past issues of the International Preservation News (IPN) have been digitised by the Preservation and Conservation Centre at the Library of Congress. IFLA would like to thank the Library of Congress for digitising these early editions of IPN and making them available to IFLA. The IPN archive of over 60 past issues is now complete and freely available online. We encourage everyone to re-discover these past issues of IPN, an important series that was published by IFLA for over 25 years with regular contributions from PAC Regional Centres. IPN ceased publication in December 2013. The IFLA Journal is picking up the mandate of IPN and will publish an issue dedicated to Cultural Heritage in its 3rd volume of 2015."

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great resource! 

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More Podcast, Less Process: The Video word made flesh - Jefferson Bailey & Joshua Ranger (Podcast)

More Podcast, Less Process: The Video word made flesh - Jefferson Bailey & Joshua Ranger (Podcast) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"More Podcast, Less Process is a podcast featuring interviews with archivists, librarians, preservationists, technologists, and information professionals about interesting work and projects within and involving archives, special collections, and cultural heritage. Topics include appraisal and acquisition, arrangement and description, reference, outreach and education, collection management, physical and digital preservation, and infrastructure and technology.

Hosts: Jefferson Bailey, Metropolitan New York Library Council & Joshua Ranger, AudioVisual Preservation Solutions.

Episodes are available here and through Internet Archive, SoundCloud, iTunes, and direct download. You can also follow via the RSS feed. All episodes are released CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US. For more information, email Jefferson at jbailey at metro dot org."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interview with archivists about video archiving.

Check series of podcasts (7 before this one) here: http://keepingcollections.org/more-podcast-less-process/

 

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“They're not pirates, they're archivists” – LARM Conference 2013

“They're not pirates, they're archivists” – LARM Conference 2013 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Centre members Oliver Carter and Jez Collins recently attended the LARM Conference, based at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark to present research they have been conducting into fan archivists, or, as they describe them, activist archivists.  The conference, featuring keynote speakers such as Lev Manovich, David Hendy and Michelle Hilmes, focused on digital media archives.  Oli and Jez’s paper was titled “They’re not pirates, they’re archivists”: The role of fans as curators and archivists of popular culture heritage.  Here’s the abstract:

This paper explores the concept of fans and online fan-sites as sites of archival practice and curation of popular culture heritage. Online fan communities are forming around sites that collectively seek out, capture, preserve and make accessible popular materials that include, but not limited to, digitised sound files, moving image files and popular music memorabilia in what Bennett (2009) has termed “DIY preservationism”.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Fans of popular culture as archivists or curators! > DIY preservationism!

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Components of an Archivist's job - @JennNewby Twitter pic

Components of an Archivist's job - @JennNewby Twitter pic | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Components of an Archivist's job : http://t.co/oG5qMzDI0I

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Technolust - the fifth column of the information counter-revolution

Hugh Rundle:

We are in an era of unprecedented change for libraries and the life of information. Bookstores throughout the western world are closing down. Libraries in the USA, UK and some in Australia are being defunded or closed. Many question the relevance of libraries, including some librarians. I am again surrounded by defeatists and the hopelessly optimistic. Many librarians appear to be searching for One Big Technology to save us. I believe that just like in Tasmania in the 1990s, this is a flawed search.

[...]

There are many other systems for sharing ideas. Why do we need libraries? What is our ‘unique value proposition’?

Libraries are a system for sharing ideas

in a way underpinned by the values of

PRESERVATION, OPENNESS, FREEDOM and PRIVACY.

This is our ‘Unique Value Proposition’.


Karen du Toit's insight:

The future of libraries lies in their unique value propositon! Good argument!

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Preserving analog films and music at the Library of Congress - The Verge

Preserving analog films and music at the Library of Congress - The Verge | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Preserving analog films and music at the Library of Congress
The Verge
Libraries preserve and circulate more than just books, and the Library of Congress is no exception.

Glenn Fleishman tours the facility.

Video here: http://www.loc.gov/avconservation/packard/

Karen du Toit's insight:

Audio-visual conservation at the LC

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Opening Up the Archives: Part 2- Keeping Ahead of Obsolescence / BBC - video

Opening Up the Archives: Part 2- Keeping Ahead of Obsolescence / BBC - video | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Ant Miller (BBC Research and Development Blog):

"In this second part of the Archive Research film we take a look at the key challenges addressed by the 'preservation' work of R&D and the BBC Information & Archives teams.  With interviews from Dr Richard Wright, Adrian Williams of I&A and others, Alex Mansfield gets to the bottom of the latest technologies being used to ensure that the critical challenge of obsolescence is handled, and handled effectively and efficiency.

With huge files, and critical quality checks essential to preserving the legacy of the archive, the best efforts of engineers and archivists are being applied to saving this content for the future."