The Information Professional
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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Editor's Column: 5 ways libraries are using Instagram

Editor's Column: 5 ways libraries are using Instagram | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Alongside universities, libraries and librarians are now using social media platforms to connect with users in a range of exciting and innovating ways. The latest platform that libraries are experimenting with isInstagram, which allows users to take photos on their smart phones, apply exciting filters and add hashtags, and then share these images online with their followers. Amy Mollett and Anthony McDonnellinvestigate how libraries are making the most of this visually-engaging platform."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries are using Instagram!

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Archive Shelfies on Storify #archiveshelfie #shelfie #archives (with images, tweets) · @karentoittoit

A compilation of archive photos being shared on Twitter
Karen du Toit's insight:

Archivists posting #archiveshelfie > curated in a Storify

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Creative Review - British Library adds one million images to Flickr

Creative Review - British Library adds one million images to Flickr | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
In what could well become one of the most interesting image collections on the web, the British Library has announced it has uploaded over one million images to Flickr from 65,000 books spanning from the 17th to the 19th ...
Karen du Toit's insight:

Exciting development!

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How Selfies Are Re-Energizing The New York Public Library

How Selfies Are Re-Energizing The New York Public Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Sydney Brownstone:

"These photobooth selfies weren't taken at a bar. They're from the New York Public Library which is mobilizing fans through pictures. (This is cool. Libraries using selfies to engage their users.

 

[...]

The photos look like they could have been taken at a bar, a bat mitzvah, or one of those swanky media parties with sponsored vodka. But they weren’t. These photobooth shots were snapped at the New York Public Library as part of a new social media initiative to engage more with the library’s selfie-loving patrons, and the live photostream is making our hearts melt.

“This is new ground for us,” Ken Weine, vice president of communications and marketing at the NYPL, tells Co.Exist. “An institution like us has to find ways to communicate with people in person and digitally, and what’s fun about this project is that we’re doing both at the same time.”

Karen du Toit's insight:

A Social Media initiative that's working!

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Europeana Releases First Free iPad App | europeana

Europeana Releases First Free iPad App | europeana | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
‘Europeana Open Culture’ introduces you to hand-picked and beautiful collections from some of Europe’s top institutions, and allows people to explore, share and comment on them. Designed by Glimworm IT during a Europeana hackathon, the app provides an easy introduction to Europe’s glorious art treasury through five specially curated themes: Maps and Plans, Treasures of Art, Treasures of the Past, Treasures of Nature and Images of the Past.
Karen du Toit's insight:

Downloaded and it looks like a very rich collection!

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25 Vintage Photos of Librarians Being Awesome

25 Vintage Photos of Librarians Being Awesome | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Emily Temple:

"Librarians, in case you hadn't heard, are essential members of society -- likely to expand minds wherever they go -- and, as such, are fully worthy of hero worship..."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Photos of librarians from the past!

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The World’s Most Beautiful Libraries, as captured on Instagram #libraries #photos

The World’s Most Beautiful Libraries, as captured on Instagram #libraries #photos | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The World’s Most Beautiful Libraries “Without libraries what have we? We have no past and no future.” -Ray Bradbury

For centuries, books have housed the collective knowledge of the world and formed the foundations of educational institutions. Given that these objects contain such value, it only makes sense that throughout history people have constructed beautiful buildings to house them.

Karen du Toit's insight:

A list of 8 most beautiful libraries around the world, as captured by the Instagram community

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Kim Williams: Mobile photography for libraries

 @thelibrarykim: Mobile photography for libraries with @haikugirlOz #aliaonline #sketchnotes http://t.co/jpC675iX

 

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Tips for mobile photography in libraries!

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The Mobile Social Photo Explosion [INFOGRAPHIC]

The Mobile Social Photo Explosion [INFOGRAPHIC] | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"This inforgraphic from Mediabiestro is a great visual of the mobile revolution.

 

Here's an excerpt:

 

The digital revolution has made an enormous impact on photography, and smartphones and social media have been hugely instrumental in this massive growth.

 

** 300 million photos are uploaded to Facebook daily

 

**Facebook has 10,000 times more photos than the Library of Congress

 

**Twitter (6.9 million daily active mobile users) and Instagram

 

**(7.3 million daily active mobile users) combined account for hours of photo-taking usage each month, and photos make up 42 percent of all posts on Tumblr.

 

 

**The money stat? 741 million mobile phones worldwide have some kind of photo capability."

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

See article and infographic here: [http://bit.ly/SLt2Nz]


Via janlgordon
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Vintage Photographs From Inside 10 Famous Libraries - Flavorwire

Vintage Photographs From Inside 10 Famous Libraries - Flavorwire | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Emily Temple:

"A mini collection of vintage photographs from inside famous libraries both at home and abroad."

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FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books

FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Futurist Thomas Frey:

"Libraries are not about books. In fact, they were never about books.
Libraries exist to give us access to information. Until recently, books were one of the more efficient forms of transferring information from one person to another. Today there are 17 basic forms of information that are taking the place of books, and in the future there will be many more…"

 

"Here is a list of 17 primary categories of information that people turn to on a daily basis. While they are not direct replacements for physical books, they all have a way of eroding our reliance on them. There may be more that I’ve missed, but as you think through the following media channels, you’ll begin to understand how libraries of the future will need to function:
Games 
Digital Books 
Audio Books 
Magazines 
Music 
Photos 
Videos 
Television 
Movies
Radio 
Blogs 
Podcasts 
Apps 
Presentations 
Courseware 
Personal Networks 
Each of these forms of information has a place in future libraries. Whether or not physical books decline or even disappear has little relevance in the overall scheme of future library operations."


Via Dennis T OConnor
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