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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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How Good Librarians Have Made Themselves Obsolete to Some Users, By Johannes Cronje - AllAfrica.com


"Thanks to the hard work and innovation of librarians and information specialists worldwide, and thanks to their dedication to free and shared resources, I am doing just fine without libraries."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Good points on how to do research without a library/librarian!

Kudos to the librarians/information specialists who knew and taught the user to do it on his own! That is where you want the researcher to be!

Nothing new that the role of the library is changing and that future needs will depend on staying on top of changing research innovations!

 

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Helen Lynch's curator insight, September 12, 2015 3:10 AM
Interesting piece about the relationship between researchers and librarians - I think we'll be around for a while yet though encouraging other researchers to reach the heights of this one. The author makes no mention of library subscriptions- I wonder if he accesses recommended articles via this avenue at all.
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8% of Librarians Believe Printed Word Will Be ‘Obsolete’ by 2050 | CNS News

8% of Librarians Believe Printed Word Will Be ‘Obsolete’ by 2050 | CNS News | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Eight percent of librarians and media center specialists believe that people will be largely illiterate by 2050 as video and audio forms of communication completely replace the printed word, according to a 2012 survey.

The survey was conducted by Grimm and Parker, an architectural firm with offices in Virginia and Maryland that has designed over 20 libraries.

"The ability of computers and handheld devices to communicate verbally is advancing at an extraordinary pace. Some believe the days of the printed word are numbered and the transition to an entirely oral/verbal/visual culture is inevitable. Others have even predicted the total demise of literacy as early as 2050."

- See more at: http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/barbara-hollingsworth/8-librarians-believe-printed-word-will-be-obsolete-2050#sthash.TaqxbSv4.qpW7HdmS.dpuf

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

8% is not a large number!

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Four Million Images from the World's Endangered Archives - Hyperallergic

Four Million Images from the World's Endangered Archives - Hyperallergic | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Allison Meier:

"Despite the vast and growing resources available online, much of the world's knowledge and history remains ephemeral and under threat of disappearance."

 

"Since 2004, the British Library’s Endangered Archives Programme, supported by the Arcadia Fund, has funded nearly 246 projects in 78 countries to preserve and digitize archives at risk of extinction."

 

"...the British Library announced in a press release the release of From Dust to Digital: Ten Years of the Endangered Archives Programme. The publication, free to read online, chronicles 19 of the major preservation projects, including monastic manuscripts in Ethiopia, ecclesiastical archives on the history of slavery in Colombia and Brazil, and the sound archives of Radio Télévision Guinée and Iranian Golha radio."

Karen du Toit's insight:

In a time where libraries and archives are burnt, this helps!

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Archivists Race Technology to Save Past Space Research, Records - Newswise (press release)

Archivists Race Technology to Save Past Space Research, Records - Newswise (press release) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

With billions of dollars of past space research at risk of being lost forever, Dr. Charles Lundquist is running a race against technology and time.

Director of the Interactive Projects Office at The University of Alabama in Huntsville’s Research Institute, the 85-year-old Dr. Lundquist spent 40 years in high-level positions with the U.S. Army, the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, NASA, and finally the University of Alabama in Huntsville. He officially retired in 1999. Working as a volunteer since then, he spends his time sleuthing for past research from the Army, NASA and private papers, as well as collecting oral histories from NASA retirees and others. All are added to an archive on the ground floor of UAH’s M. Louis Salmon Library, where Anne Coleman is a reference librarian and head of Archives and Special Collections. The archives preserve continued access for future historians, scholars and students.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Archivists racing against time with formats becoming obsolete!

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