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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Thirsty? Go to a library, not a coffee shop - Telegraph.co.uk

Thirsty? Go to a library, not a coffee shop - Telegraph.co.uk | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries should be re-branded as vibrant community hubs offering free wifi, comfy sofas and coffee, according to government-commissioned report The recommendations are made in the Independent Library Report for England, commissioned by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport earlier this year.
Karen du Toit's insight:
"Vibrant community hubs!"
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Olga Kudriavtseva 's curator insight, December 19, 2:38 AM

Эпоха библиотек как молчаливых читальных залов с книгами в качестве единственного продукта закончилась, и для того, чтобы выжить, они должны стать "живыми и привлекательными эпицентрами деятельности общества».



RuthEastham's curator insight, December 22, 8:46 AM

...ibraries ........must become “vibrant and attractive community hubs”

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Librarian Publishers May Be More Important Than You Think, by Phill Jones - Part 1

Librarian Publishers May Be More Important Than You Think, by Phill Jones  - Part 1 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Librarians have been acting in a limited way as publishers since well before the internet, but over the last 5 years or so, a revitalized librarian-publisher movement has emerged. 

....

the second edition of the Library Publishing Directory (2015), edited by Sarah Lippincott, tells a very different story. The directory is a non-exhaustive collection of 124 case studies of library publishing programs (111 based inside the US and Canada). According to Lippincott’s analysis, around 90% of library publishers work in collaboration with academic departments and faculty on campus, drawing on in-house expertise to form editorial and review boards. In return, the library supports research from their own institutions by providing an avenue for publication, particularly in niche research areas. While many library publishers (68%) also work with student journals such as university law reviews, the perception that library publishers ‘mostly publish student research’ isn’t backed up by the numbers."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Librarians as publishers!

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How Libraries are Advancing and Inspiring Schools and Communities - KQED (blog)

How Libraries are Advancing and Inspiring Schools and Communities - KQED (blog) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries are experimenting with some exciting ways to inspire and engage the community by creating meeting and maker spaces with old technology and new

 

"...

a report just released by the Aspen Institute Dialogue on Public Libraries asks us again to reconsider how the library can serve communities in the 21st century. “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries” aims to “capture the momentum and excitement of the innovations taking place in public libraries across the country, and the impact these are having on communities,” said the group’s director, Amy Garmer. The report asks: With all the new technology and layered networks, what can be done beyond current advancements?

“We are a place for the curious, for creativity, a place for learning, a place to experiment. It’s always been the mission of the library. We’re just using different tools.”

The Dialogue on Public Libraries group is supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Libraries Program and is made up of 34 library field leaders, business executives, government officials, education experts and community development visionaries. The group aims for more than just holding up great examples of libraries working well in the digital age.

“We want to provide a catalyst for new thinking about libraries as platforms for learning, creativity and innovation in their communities, and the creation of new networked forms of libraries,” Garmer said. If the report could spark engagement at the local, state and national levels to rethink how to use libraries and then constructively act on it, Garmer said, then the group’s goal will have been achieved."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great end-of-year question regenerate services for next year!

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The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries - Times of San Diego

The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries - Times of San Diego | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Peter C. Herman"For the past few years, both the California State University and the University of California libraries have been experimenting with packages that replace paper books with e-books. The advantages are obvious. With e-books, you no longer have to schlep to a library to take out a book. You just log on from whatever device connects you to the web, at whatever time and in whatever state of dress, and voila! the book appears on your screen.

But the real attraction is price. Library budgets, along with university budgets, have been slashed, and such companies as Pearson and Elsevier offer e-book packages that make it possible to gain access (I’ll explain the awkward syntax in a moment) to lots of books at what seems like a minimal cost. The savings are multiplied when the package serves the entire system. So instead of each campus buying a paper book, all 23 CSU’s, for instance, share a single e-book. That’s the theory, at least. The reality is very different."

 

...

"Instead, a library pays to access a data file by one of two routes: “PDA,” or “Patron-Driven Acquisition,” in which a vendor makes available a variety of e-books, and a certain number of “uses” (the definition varies) triggers a purchase, or a subscription to an e-library that does not involve any mechanism for buying the e-book. Both avenues come loaded with all sorts of problems.

First, reading an e-book is a different, and lesser, experience that reading a paper book, just aswatching a movie at home differs from watching one in a theatre.

There’s a huge difference between casual and college reading, and recent studies prove beyond doubt that while e-books are perfectly fine for the latest John Grisham or Fifty Shades of Grey, they actively discourage intense reading and deep learning."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The impact of e-books on libraries and learning. Not good!

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BOOKTRYST: The Shocking Hard-Boiled World Of Librarians! - book covers used as parodies

BOOKTRYST: The Shocking Hard-Boiled World Of Librarians! - book covers used as parodies | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"All images courtesy of Professional Library Literature with special thanks to the anonymous creator of these brilliant book parodies, who, I suspect, may be in fear of losing their job if outed. Additional thanks to B.T. Carver of LISNews for drawing our attention to this delightful webpage. There are more of the same on the site."

Karen du Toit's insight:

All librarians can identify with at least one of these!

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10 Must-Read Books about Libraries & Librarians, by Simon McDonald

10 Must-Read Books about Libraries & Librarians, by Simon McDonald | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Simon McDonald, Editorial Manager | simon@thereadingroom.com

"In the words of Jamie Ford in his novel The Songs of Willow Frost, libraries are “like a candy store where everything is free.” These 10 books will remind you of why libraries are such special places."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great list!

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Free Twitter Analytics - what can libraries and archives get out of it? - Ned Potter

Free Twitter Analytics - what can libraries and archives get out of it? - Ned Potter | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Twitter stats packages are sort of fascinating but also not. I look at a fair few because I need to be able to talk about them in social media workshops: what tends to happen is I put my username in, go 'ooooh that's interesting!' a few times, but then never actually go back and check the analysis on a second occasion.

As individuals we don't really need Twitter stats apps (unless you take Twitter very seriously) but as organisations they can be genuinely useful. They can help us understand our network, show us what works (so we can build on it) and what doesn't (so we can phase it out).

For an analysis package to be useful to an organisation it really needs three qualities:

1. It must give you information you can ACT on. There are a million
stats apps out there, but if they don't tell you anything which you
can use to inform better practice for your twitter account, then they
don't really have any value.
2. It must NOT tweet things about that information on your behalf. Someapps tell you useful things - but they tell the rest of the world
those useful things too. I'm dubious about this at the best of times
(for me an auto-tweet saying "This week on Twitter: X follows /
unfollows, Y ReTweets and Z total reach!" either looks a bit awkward if X, Y and Z are small numbers, and a bit show-boaty if they're large) but I really don't think organisational accounts should have anything tweeted on their behalf.
3. It ideally needs to be free. Some things are worth paying for but
realistically it's hard to get the people who control the
purse-strings in libraries to shell-out for a Twitter stats annual
subscription...

Thankfully the official Twitter Analytics, newly available for all, meets all three of those criteria. If you just tweet as yourself, sign in to analytics.twitter.com and have a look a round at the things worth noting; it's interesting to see how few of your followers actually see your tweets, for example."


Karen du Toit's insight:

Great guide to make the most of your Twitter Analytics for your library or archive!

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Karen du Toit's curator insight, September 4, 3:43 AM

Great guide! Also for any corporate account!

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Libraries and Kindle Unlimited, by Jill O'Neill | The Scholarly Kitchen

Libraries and Kindle Unlimited, by Jill O'Neill | The Scholarly Kitchen | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"In the wake of Amazon’s announcement of a new ebook subscription service, Forbes published an article by a British think tank employee with the link-bait title of “Close the Libraries and Buy Everyone An Amazon Kindle Unlimited Subscription”. As you might gather, the idea put forth was that supporting this licensing approach might be more cost effective for enabling the public’s access to content than the traditional public library in the United Kingdom. While that might not be the greatest idea, there is still much that scholarly publishers can learn from Amazon’s business strategy.

As a historical footnote, subscription based libraries were big in Britain during the 18th and 19th century when reasonably affluent individuals might pay for access to the latest three volume novel. (For some historical background on subscription based lending libraries, see here and here respectively). In the context of the Kindle Unlimited subscription, the reader pays Amazon $120 per year (or $119.88, if we’re being sticklers for accuracy) and gains access to as much as they want from a collection of about 600,000 titles. Critics have noted that these are not the high-end titles found in a first rate public or academic library; Amazon’s offering doesn’t include best-sellers, textbooks or scholarly monographs."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The controversial debate about the future of libraries vs subscription based ebook services. 

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Transmedia Storytelling for Social Impact, y Dr Pamela Rutledge.

 

 


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great to take note of in libraries/archives as well! Can;t just use single platforms!

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, August 14, 2:23 AM


An excellent presentation from Dr. Pamela Rutledge.

Kajsa Hartig's curator insight, August 14, 2:39 AM

Transmedia Storytelling - for the public good.

Jerri Lynn Hogg's curator insight, August 14, 5:40 PM
Great presentation!
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The case for making libraries full of toys and games

The case for making libraries full of toys and games | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
American businessman and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie’s public library legacy was built on a boyhood dream: to acquire knowledge. Carnegie believed in “the meritocratic nature of America,” that anyone “with the right inclination and desire could educate himself” and therefore succeed, and that libraries should contribute directly to that. 

So what are libraries doing lending out toys and holding game nights? Aren’t American kids’ test scores lagging behind those of pretty much the rest of the world? Shouldn’t American public libraries be, as Carnegie wanted, educating? Recent studies, and librarians themselves, say otherwise.

In a study with 70 six-year olds, psychologists at the University of Colorado found that the children who engaged in more free play had a “more highly developed self-directed executive function” than those who had spent more time in “structured activities,” that were adult-led rather than child-initiated."


Via nickcarman
Karen du Toit's insight:

The importance of play in the development of children! Definitely should be addressed by libraries!

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nickcarman's curator insight, August 12, 1:00 AM

This is an interesting article with lots of useful links.

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Two sides to that “who’s the boss” coin | David Lee King

Two sides to that “who’s the boss” coin | David Lee King | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"... your technology department shouldn’t really be the one making system-wide decisions for the library.

 

There’s a couple other sides to that coin, I think. They include:

 

Sometimes, IT should make those decisions. For example:

They’re the technology experts, and probably know what will work the best for the library. Listen to them!" and more...
Karen du Toit's insight:

When to listen to the IT department and building up a dynamic relationship with the IT department.

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Libraries Rock! | Hitchhiker - Country rocker visiting public libraries on tour

Libraries Rock! | Hitchhiker - Country rocker visiting public libraries on tour | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Posted by 

Mary Kaminski 

"In the latest issue of Rolling Stone Magazine, an article about country/rock band Old Crow Medicine Show references the Octavia Fellin Public Library in Gallup and front man Ketch Secor’s recent visit there:


 

Ketch Secor doesn’t own a laptop or a smartphone, so most days when he wakes up on tour with his band Old Crow Medicine Show, he’ll head to the local library to check his e-mail. “I was just in a library in Gallup, New Mexico, with 25 Navajos,” he says. “It’s communal, like the Greyhound station of the Internet.”


Old Crow Medicine Show, photo credit: Rolling Stone Magazine


Full article here: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/how-ketch-secor-started-wild-roots-band-old-crow-medicine-show-20140721


Also,  a tip to help you know if your library is getting noticed! - Search engine alert service

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great anecdote about public libraries!

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IFLA launches the 2014 eLending Background Paper | IFLA

IFLA launches the 2014 eLending Background Paper | IFLA | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The eLending environment for libraries around the world continues to change at a rapid pace. In 2012, IFLA released its Background Paper on eLending, which formed the basis for the production of the IFLA Principles for Library eLending, the third revision of which was issued at the World Library & Information Congress (WLIC) in Singapore in August 2013.

Cognisant of the great changes taking place in ePublishing, and the varied eLending challenges and opportunities facing libraries in different geographical regions, the IFLA Governing Board commissioned a supplement to the eLending Background Paper in 2013 reflecting recent developments.

Chair of the eLending Group Paul Whitney coordinated the updating of the IFLA eLending Background Paper, together with Working Group members comprising Margaret Allen, Vincent Bonnet, Christina de Castell, Harald von Hielmcrone, Sarah Kaddu, Gerald Leitner, Ngian Lek Choh, Barbara Lison, Mary Minow, Harald Mueller, Denise Nicholson, Carrie Russell,  Amelie Vallotton, Chloe Vicente and Qiang Zhu.

 Issues addressed in the updated eLending paper include:

In acknowledgement of the differing interpretations of what is an eBook, reflected in the vastly differing holdings and use statistics reported by libraries, definitions of “eBook” and “eLending” are proposed.Recent trends in the publishing and distribution of ebooks are reviewedLibrary advocacy efforts with publishers and governments are describedRelevant court rulings on digital exhaustion governing how libraries can acquire and deploy eBooks are analysed.

eLending Working Group Chair Paul Whitney will present the 2014 eLending Background Paper at the EBLIDA/CLM Satellite Meeting,Copyright and beyond: Libraries in the public sphere in Strasbourg, France from 13-14 August."

 

Word 

http://www.ifla.org/files/assets/hq/topics/e-lending/documents/revised_background_paper_elending.doc

 

PDF 

http://www.ifla.org/files/assets/hq/topics/e-lending/documents/2014_ifla_elending_background_paper.pdf

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Addressing some of the challenges of e-lending.

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End of year lists: gorgeous library lists

End of year lists:  gorgeous library lists | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The end of the year seems to bring out journalists' list making tendencies. Our web feeds have been filled lately with Top 10 this and  Best of...that.  We think there are enough lists out there so...
Karen du Toit's insight:

List about beautiful and spectacular libraries!

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NASIG : Core Competencies for Print Serials Librarians

NASIG : Core Competencies for Print Serials Librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

The NASIG Core Competencies Task Force (CCTF) is seeking comment on a draft of the Core Competencies for Print Serials Librarians.  This document adds to the NASIG Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians by describing the skills that librarians need to manage physical format serials in today’s libraries.


Via liblist4u, Ayla Stein
Karen du Toit's insight:

Comments here: Sanjeet_Mann@redlands.edu

 

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29 Moments Any Librarian Knows Too Well

29 Moments Any Librarian Knows Too Well | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"I'm looking for this book, I forget the title, but there's a dog on the cover...?"
Karen du Toit's insight:

All of these! We can relate!

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Try Your Local Library Instead of a Coffee Shop to Get Work Done - Dave Greenbaum

Try Your Local Library Instead of a Coffee Shop to Get Work Done - Dave Greenbaum | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
When you think of a library, most people think of a quiet place to study. If you want to get work done and spread out, you go to a coffee shop. Newer libraries offer the same amenities as coffee shops, and sometimes even more.

 

Read more:

http://www.fastcompany.com/3034143/the-public-library-wants-to-be-your-office

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

The library of the future! Definitely

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Librarians On YouTube: About this blog

Librarians On YouTube: About this blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"... there is a definite archetype that has been established within our culture when it comes to what a librarian is "supposed" to look/act like, and that figure has permeated the representation of this field for more years than I care to count ... Whether it be film and television, or more modern media outlets like video games and the internet, you can find the librarians' profession portrayed (even ridiculed) with the same basic broad strokes. So, not to put too fine a point on it, but that's where this blog comes in ... THE PLAN Ever since I myself (full disclosure!) began pursuing a Master's Degree in order to join the ranks of the full-fledged librarian, I've become fascinated with the portrayal of this profession in popular culture, particularly those depictions which have made their way onto Youtube ... As such, I decided long ago to begin cataloging as many instances of these representations as I could find on the popular video-sharing site. A daunting task, to be sure, but I gladly accept the challenge ... And, truth be told, there are a LOT more portrayals of librarianship on there than I ever could have imagined! Of course, there's plenty of the familiar (i.e. unflattering) stereotypes on there, but dig deep enough and you can actually find some honest-to-goodness attempts to portray the profession in a positive light (some posted by librarians themselves, some not); you just need to take the time to look ... or follow this blog, either one ;) These portrayals can consist of fictitious characters (television, cartoons, movies, etc.) or real-life flesh-and-blood librarians (news stories, promotional videos, vlogs, etc.) ... Whatever the genre, whatever the format, I'm just looking for YouTube videos that someone out there felt was worth the time and effort to post for a world-wide audience as a representation of the profession (either in a positive or negative light)!" 
Karen du Toit's insight:

A stunning collection of portrayals of librarians found on YouTube!

Well done, Alessandro!

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