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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Sharing the knowledge: taking notes on open data from records managers and archivists - Archives Records 2014 Conf

Sharing the knowledge: taking notes on open data from records managers and archivists - Archives Records 2014 Conf | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Alisha Green

"More than 2,300 records managers and archivists from around the world gathered in Washington, DC, last week to talk about public records and managing the massive amount of new information being created by technology. Discussions at the conference made it clear that the open data community can benefit from connecting with and learning from people in the records management and archival communities. We share many of the same challenges and goals with determining how governments can best share information and preserve access to it.

Last week's conference, Archives*Records 2014: Ensuring Access, was a joint meeting of the Council of State Archivists, Society of American Archivists, and National Association of Government Archives & Records Administrators. Topics discussed ranged from copyright law to appraising records for determining what to keep permanently, but some of the conversations most relevant to those interested in open data centered around electronic records and metadata."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Taking this from the notes as well: "There is much to be learned from starting a dialogue between the open data, records management and archival communities. Both open data and the records management communities face similar challenges. We are increasingly sharing our knowledge and resources online, and now it's time to align ourselves as groups with key roles to play in the goal of ensuring access to and preservation of records."

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The Future of Libraries - 7 questions librarians need to answer - Lee Rainie (Slideshare)

"Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center Internet Project, runs through the seven questions libraries need to address as they consider future services and their role for their patrons and communities. He describes how project research about the changing role of technology in people’s lives affects the kinds of issues librarians need to address as they experience the disruptions of technology change."

[...]

1.  What’s the future of knowledge? 2.  What’s the future of pathways to knowledge (reference expertise)? 3.  What’s the future of public technology and community anchor institutions? 4.  What’s the future of learning “spaces”? 5.  What’s the future of attention (and its structural holes)? 6.  What’s the franchise?7: Where do you fit on the dashboard?"

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great questions to answer for the profession.

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Marylène Goulet's comment, April 20, 2014 8:32 PM
Slide no. 29
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Library Infographics: 1930′s style

Library Infographics: 1930′s style | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Michael Lieberman:

Nowadays, the visualization of data is all the rage. It seems each new study or piece of research is turned into an image.
I'm not so sure this was as common in the 1930's and 40's when these visual aids were printed.

The series of 28 posters were produced under the supervision of noted librarian Ruby Ethel Cundiff for the Library School Course in Teaching the Use of the Library at the George Peabody College for Teachers.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Stunning Infographics salvaged from a library pile!

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NELLCO's curator insight, June 13, 2013 8:58 AM

Very cool collection! Digitized by Claremont Colleges Digital Library.

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Lawyers & Librarians: Google's Battle for the Books, by @jeffjohnroberts

Lawyers & Librarians: Google's Battle for the Books, by @jeffjohnroberts | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"I'm happy to announce the publication of my e-book, The Battle for the Books: Inside Google's Gambit to Build the World's Biggest Library. This is a 50 page tale of gossip and rivalries between lawyers and librarians, and shows a cultural collision between Silicon Valley and the east coast over control of books and knowledge."

 

Available here: http://pro.gigaom.com/books/the-battle-for-the-books/

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Mindful reasons to revisit our local libraries » Mindful Living Network

Mindful reasons to revisit our local libraries » Mindful Living Network | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"With free information online, many people question the value of public libraries. Unfortunately, they're overlooking how important these institutions are to our community..."

 

"Here are Mindful reasons (from Public Libraries online) for why we should revisit our local libraries:

 

Community builders: Local libraries not only address local social problems, but also preserve historic artifacts and relevant histories.

Centers of diversity: They provide information about diverse cultures. They also offer programs and sources for immigrants and non-English speakers.

Centers of art: Public libraries provide space and information for free art exploration and expression.

Education: Writers of this Public Libraries article call libraries “the people’s university,” providing knowledge for all, regardless of socioeconomic statuses.

Guardians of knowledge: Our libraries help with child development, not only by providing books but also programs like summer reading and tutoring."

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Knoco stories: Self-generated silos - it's worse than we thought.

Knoco stories: Self-generated silos - it's worse than we thought. | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Knowledge Management ideas and models from Nick Milton of Knoco - sometimes provocative, but always grounded in experience.

 

"... social media can fragment into small silos of discussion, and how the wisdom of the crowd can fragment into the self-reinforcement of the clique. I cited the fact that there were over one hundred Knowledge Management discussion groups on Linked-in as an example oif how discussion can fragment into silos.

It's worse than I thought.
According to a recent post by Ian Wooller, there are now,

26 Alumni groups32 Corporate groups20 Conference groups132 Networking groups16 Nonprofit groups196 Professional groups.

All purporting to cover Knowledge Management.

That's a total of 422 groups."

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The Intranet of Everywhere - Solution Brief from Coveo

The Intranet of Everywhere - Solution Brief from Coveo | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
To capture maximum value from enterprise knowledge, organizations must empower teams with tools to swiftly find and engage content and experts relevant to their job and the task at hand. In an age marked by the “Commercialization of IT” and mobile workers, many organizations have found that letting workers utilize tools and applications they prefer promotes collaboration. But how can you adopt such an approach while making sure others can easily (and securely) find and re-purpose that knowledge in the future?
Karen du Toit's insight:

Free download available.

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Verna Allee on Incentivizing Knowledge Sharing

In a mini-interview with Alakh Asthana of eClerx Services, Verna talks about why deliberate incentives for knowledge sharing are not necessary. She explains ...
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Margaret Driscoll, Learning Organization Librarian's curator insight, June 27, 2013 11:59 AM

"... people love to talk about their work - how they solved a problem, something that they ran into, that they had a really great idea and it worked out etc. It's very natural for employees to share their achievements, problems and other areas of interests over informal coffee table discussions."

Karen du Toit's curator insight, June 28, 2013 4:10 AM

People love sharing knowledge!

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Creation, consumption, and the library, by Lane Wilkinson

Creation, consumption, and the library, by Lane Wilkinson | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Last week I had an interesting Twitter conversation regarding a popular rhetorical strategy surrounding maker-spaces, New Librarianship, participatory culture, and the other assorted "big ideas" for the future of libraries."

 

"The common thread and the favored tactic in the literature surrounding libraries and maker-spaces is to draw a sharp distinction between the consumption of knowledge and the creation of knowledge. By ‘knowledge consumption’ most writers seem to mean reading; by ‘knowledge creation’ most seem to mean hacking, tinkering, building, making, or collaborating. And the way the conversation is being shaped by this rhetoric, it’s clear that knowledge consumption is old and in the way and what we really need is to forge ahead into a bright future of knowledge creation. Yes, some librarians make the case that we need both creation and consumption (e.g., “…in addition to knowledge consumption”), but the rhetorical device is still in play: knowledge can be either consumed or created, and the library of the future is weighted towards creation."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Consumption vs creation of knowledge in libraries > the future!

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The New Librarianship Worldview, by R David Lankes

"Your worldview dictates what is possible and often without even knowing it. Presentation at the Library 2.012 conference. Describes the rising view within librarinship focused on knowledge and community."

 


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
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Wikipedia And The Death Of The Expert

Wikipedia And The Death Of The Expert | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"Learners are doers, not recipients."—Walter J.

 

"Learning" no longer means sitting passively in a lecture hall or on in front of a television or in a library and waiting to receive the "authoritative" version of what the experts think is up as if it were a Communion wafer.

For nearly 20 years we have had the Internet, now grown into a medium of almost infinite paths, where "learning" means that you can Twitter directly to people in Egypt to ask them what they really think about ElBaradei (and get answers), ask an author or critic to address a point you feel he may have missed (ditto), or share your own insights in countless forums where they will be read and admired (and/or savaged.) Knowledge is growing more broadly and immediately participatory and collaborative by the moment."

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The Content Economy: Why traditional intranets fail today's knowledge workers

The Content Economy: Why traditional intranets fail today's knowledge workers | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Tacit knowledge doesn't allow itself to be captured"

 

"In a knowledge-intensive business environment, it is often very hard or even impossible to anticipate in advance what information is needed. You simply cannot know what information will be relevant before the moment you need it. The information might not exist until the moment you need it, or you are simply unaware of its existence. That’s why more is better (“more is more”) when it comes to information supply in a knowledge-intensive business environment. If there is more to choose from, chances are there will be something for (almost) any need. That’s also why it has become critical for knowledge workers to access to the information abundance on the Internet. We also need to have immediate access to anyone who might possess the knowledge and information we need but which is not captured – often because it is hard to capture or simply does not allow itself to be captured (tacit knowledge) and exchanged."

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