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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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A Curated Collection of The Best Search Engines for Your Information Need

A Curated Collection of The Best Search Engines for Your Information Need | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

From Robin Good's insight:

"A curated selection of the best search engines organized according to what you need to find..."


Read full Robin Good's insight below.


Check out it: http://www.noodletools.com/debbie/literacies/information/5locate/adviceengine.html

 


Via Robin Good, Giuseppe Mauriello
Karen du Toit's insight:

Good to keep handy!

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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, June 17, 2014 7:59 AM

Good reference list. I didn't realize there were so many search engines.

Pushpa Kunasegaran's curator insight, June 19, 2014 7:58 PM

This is an excellent resource!

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, August 14, 2014 5:22 PM

For more resources on Social Media & Content Curation visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

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World Radio Day on 13 February 2013 - highlighting the importance of radio

World Radio Day on 13 February 2013 - highlighting the importance of radio | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

February 13 is the day proclaimed by UNESCO and endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly to celebrate Radio as a medium; to improve international cooperation between broadcasters; and to encourage major networks and community radio alike to promote access to information and freedom of expression over the airwaves. UNESCO encourages all countries
to celebrate World Radio Day by planning activities in partnership with regional, national and international broadcasters, non-governmental organizations, the media and the public.

Karen du Toit's insight:

The day promotes access to information and freedom of expression, which librarians and archivists strive to do as well!

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New Knowledge Sharing for Product Development Teams, by Matt Priest

New Knowledge Sharing for Product Development Teams, by Matt Priest | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Today, three ring binders and file cabinets still clutter the offices of marketers and market researchers at Fortune 500 companies that are considered leaders in innovation. Most of these companies probably have sophisticated enterprise information systems that contain sales information, financials, product data records, inventory and even employee time‐tracking.


The answer lies with improved information retention, data accuracy and knowledge capture. This requires a three‐part change in most organizations.

Part 1: Process ChangePart 2: Supporting Technology ChangePart 3: Culture Change

 

In a world where information changes every second and flows freely from source to source, innovation data tracking is more necessary than ever. The insights and knowledge gained through this practice are priceless and will become the foundation of innovation success for years to come.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Argument for better information management to enhance innovation in companies!

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16 Resources for Librarians Preparing for the Mayan Apocalypse, by Ellyssa Kroski

16 Resources for Librarians Preparing for the Mayan Apocalypse, by Ellyssa Kroski | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Librarians are prepared for anything. Why? Because we do our background research and have plenty of resources to consult for any given event. So, why should the Mayan Apocalypse be any different?
Karen du Toit's insight:

Valuable to librarians who want to pass on the information:

The information, the resources and the apps! 

 

(Librarian humour!)

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Internet of Everything: It’s the Connections that Matter - by Dave Evans, via @CiscoSystems

Internet of Everything: It’s the Connections that Matter - by Dave Evans, via @CiscoSystems | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"It is important to understand that the real value of the Internet of Everything (IoE) lies in both the number and value of connections."

YouTube video: http://youtu.be/bVNJfUOBzJE

The conversation: #IoE and #InternetofEverything

[...] even if only a fraction of things connect to other things, the connections among them grow exponentially.

So, while it’s fun to play with the numbers, it is clear that the most important aspect of IoE is the value that results from making intelligent and relevant connections to give people and machines the information needed to make better decisions."
Via Pierre Tran
Karen du Toit's insight:

Important for librarians to consider as well!

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Librarians before, librarians now, librarians next, by Ned Potter

Librarians before, librarians now, librarians next, by Ned Potter | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

>> Very short Prezi on the future of librarianship. Although done in April 2011, it is still valid!

 

"[...]The Gate. I’ve been thinking the role of the librarian as gatekeeper is completely dead – but it hasn’t occurred to me till today that in effect we’ll be manning (and womanning) the other side of the gate. The gate used to have a certain status, a certain gravitas to it – we, the librarian, hold the key to knowledge; come to us and we will let you through (probably). Now the gate is open and people can go through as they please to a large extent – no need to apply to us for permission to enter, just help yourself online. But in future as information perpetuates to such an extent that the diamonds are almost impossible to find in the avalanche of rough, perhaps the old gate will be dusted off and rehung on its hinges. And this time we librarians will be trying to hold back the flood of information, and just letting the legitimate and valued resources leak through to the people on the other side of the gate."

-thewikiman


Via Learning Lrnr
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Death of the cassette tape exaggerated, via News24 & Reuters

Death of the cassette tape exaggerated, via News24 & Reuters | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The widening gap between the amount of data the world produces and the capacity to store it is giving a new lease of life to the humble cassette tape.

 

"Although consumers have abandoned the audio cassette in favour of the ubiquitous iPod, organisations with large amounts of data, from patient records to capacity-hungry video archives, have continued to use tape as a cheap and secure storage medium.

Researchers at IBM are trying to keep this 60-year old technology relevant for at least the next decade and they are getting help from rising energy costs, which are forcing companies to look for cheaper alternatives to stacks of power-hungry hard drives.

Evangelos Eleftheriou and his colleagues at IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, have developed a cassette just 10cm by 10cm by 2cm that can hold about 35 terabytes of data, the equivalent of a library with 400km of bookshelves.

"It is really the greenest storage technology," Eleftheriou told Reuters. "Tape at rest, consumes literally zero power."

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7 Time-Proven Strategies for Dealing With Information Overload, curated by Beth Kanter

7 Time-Proven Strategies for Dealing With Information Overload, curated by Beth Kanter | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Curated by Beth Kanter

http://www.bethkanter.org

 

"The advice is from 1962 study and has been updated for today's daily battle with digital overload.   The techniques are very much still valid.

 

 

1. Omission – The concept is simple: you can’t consume everything, so just ignore some. This is a bit dangerous since some of the omitted information might be the most critical. Imagine that the email you ignored was the one where your most important client alerts you to a new opportunity.

 

2. Error – Respond to information without giving due consideration. While a seemingly poor strategy, this is more common than you might think; I mean, who hasn’t reacted to an email, report, or telephone call without thinking through all the consequences because of time constraints or lack of attention?

 

 

3. Queuing – Putting information aside until there is time catch up later. An example is processing email early in the morning, before the business day begins, or reading important reports late at night.

 

 

4. Filtering – This is similar to omission except filtering employs a priority scheme for processing some information while ignoring others. Automated tools are particularly well suited to help filter information. Recommendation engines, search tools, email Inbox rule engines and Tivo are all good examples of tools that can help filter and prioritize information.

 

5. Employing multiple/parallel channels – Doling out information processing tasks; for example, assigning the tracking of Twitter feeds to one person and blog coverage to another person on your team.

 

6. Approximation – Processing information with limited precision. Skimming is an example of approximation. Like omission and error, you can process more information by approximating, but you run the risk of making critical mistakes

 

7. Escaping from the task – Making this someone else’s problem. While it sounds irresponsible, admitting you can’t ‘do it all’ and giving an assignment to someone else is sometimes the best strategy of all."

 

 

 

 

 


Via Beth Kanter
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Robin Martin's comment, November 4, 2012 11:12 AM
Great info...thanks for "scooping" Deb!
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, November 4, 2012 4:51 PM
You are welcome Robin. There's definitely some good interest in this topic!
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Library and Information History - timeline

Library and Information History - timeline | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
A timeline of libraries and information history including technologies, epic events and just cool things you didn't know before.

Via Joao Brogueira, Errol A. Adams JD/MLS
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A New World of Data | American Libraries Magazine

A New World of Data | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Karen Coyle:

"With the visible speed-up of all forms of information resources, even those that are ostensibly in traditional offline formats, doubts are growing about the ability of libraries to afford the costs of hand-hewn bibliographic control today and in the future.

Linking and federating

What if you extrapolate from developments within library systems, such as federated searching, enhanced catalogs, and OpenURL, to the idea of libraries on the web?"

[...]

"The Semantic Web will develop in two ways: First, by linking information that exists within documents, and second, by making the data itself accessible on the web. The ability to mark up information in documents could allow smarter access to that information than we get with keyword searching. For example, markup could identify the author of a document so that an author search could be done, something search engines do not provide today."


Via Trudy Raymakers
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23 things for professional development, training and networking for Information Professionals

A talk given to the Historic Libraries Forum conference 'Hard Times' on Tuesday 15 November 2011.

 

 

23 things for professional development training and networking in hard times, by Katie Birkwood, University Library Cambridge
"23 Things‟ is a type of training……which started at the Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County (North Carolina, USA) in August 2006.
the PLCMC course aimed…“…to encourage staff to experiment and learn about the new and emerging technologies that are reshaping the context of information on the Internet today”
23 things course gives participants 23 tools to try out and asks them to write a blog post about each of them.

things are introduced according to a schedule, but participants choose when to do each thing.

blogging is intended to encourage support and communication amongst and between participants.
23 things has been hugely popular…"

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6 Tips for Optimizing Your Content for the Latest Trends in Consumption | Content Marketing Institute

6 Tips for Optimizing Your Content for the Latest Trends in Consumption | Content Marketing Institute | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Excerpted from the article:

 

"During the past six months there have been some major changes in the way audiences consume information. These changes are happening simultaneously on two fronts, one in the form of content curation and the other in content shifting.

While content curation is nothing new, the rise in the use of mobile devices is changing when, where, and how we read internet content.

 

Content shifting:

Mobile devices are allowing people to break free from the computer desk and shift both the physical environment and the time in which they read or consume content.

This content shifting can be as simple as using tools like Evernote’s Clearly on a web browser.

Apps such as Pocket and Instapaper allow us to save articles discovered on a desktop computer to read later on any internet-connected device.

 

Sifting through the glut of information:

Many social media platforms have taken on the role of content curators, developing algorithms in an attempt to help us weed out the information we don’t want and present us with the information we do. This has been evidenced through a variety of changes in the Facebook Timeline, the #Discover tab on Twitter, and social search results in Google.

 

The latest wave of content shifting applications also curate and reformat articles to gear them toward our personal interests, fundamentally changing the reading experience as they do so. Programs such as Flipboard and Zite gather content from RSS feeds, Twitter, and Facebook streams and present it in a mobile-friendly magazine format.

 

Tips to optimize for content shifting and content curation:

1. Incorporate calls to action directly into the text...

2. Optimize for mobile...

3. Capitalize on compelling images...

4. Write strong headlines, lead paragraphs, and meta descriptions...

5. Maximize social media sharing...

6. Publish and promote quality content..."

 

Each element and tip is analyzed with more information. Read full article here: http://j.mp/LmZpjT

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Information Overload Is Not Unique To Digital Age : NPR

The overload of the print revolution led to indexes, reference books, editors, authors, classification systems. 17 minute 48 second audio interview with author of "Too Much to Know Managing Scholarly Information Before the Modern Age" -- Howard

 

"It is a constant complaint: We're choking on information. The flood of data on the Web has reached mind boggling proportions, and it shows no signs of stopping. But wait, says Harvard professor Ann Blair -- this is not a new condition."


Via Howard Rheingold, Joao Brogueira
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Technolust - the fifth column of the information counter-revolution

Hugh Rundle:

We are in an era of unprecedented change for libraries and the life of information. Bookstores throughout the western world are closing down. Libraries in the USA, UK and some in Australia are being defunded or closed. Many question the relevance of libraries, including some librarians. I am again surrounded by defeatists and the hopelessly optimistic. Many librarians appear to be searching for One Big Technology to save us. I believe that just like in Tasmania in the 1990s, this is a flawed search.

[...]

There are many other systems for sharing ideas. Why do we need libraries? What is our ‘unique value proposition’?

Libraries are a system for sharing ideas

in a way underpinned by the values of

PRESERVATION, OPENNESS, FREEDOM and PRIVACY.

This is our ‘Unique Value Proposition’.


Karen du Toit's insight:

The future of libraries lies in their unique value propositon! Good argument!

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Open Source: Freedom and Community, Slideshare by Nicole Engard

As presented at KohaCon12

Via liblivadia, João Greno Brogueira
Karen du Toit's insight:

Open Source & free source > Why libraries should care!

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Are we meeting the needs of student users in academic libraries? | American Libraries Magazine

Are we meeting the needs of student users in academic libraries? | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
- “Meeting the Needs of Student Users in Academic Libraries: Reaching Across the Great Divide,” published by Chandos Publishing and available through ALA Neal-Schuman, takes an honest look at learning commons in academic libraries and discusses what is working and what is not.

To evaluate their findings, authors Michele Crump and LeiLani Freund examine the measurement tools that libraries have used to evaluate usage and satisfaction, including contemporary anthropological studies that provide a more detailed view of students’ approach to research. They take a candid look at these redesigns and ask if improvements have lived up to expectations of increased service and user satisfaction. Including many actual survey questions and answers, this book will help academic librarians and administrators provide better services to student users.

 

Book available here: http://www.neal-schuman.com/mtnos

Karen du Toit's insight:

Good to read to enhance services, especially in academic libraries

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