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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Going Big: Successes Back from SAA 2015 - Archivists responding to climate change

Going Big: Successes Back from SAA 2015 - Archivists responding to climate change | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Members of ProjectARCC converged upon Cleveland, Ohio last week with fellow archivistsfrom across the United States and beyond, sharing ideas, new projects, and best practices on the preservation and access of historical materials for current and future generations.

This was ProjectARCC’s first national opportunity to share news about our work, our concerns about the impact of climate change on the archival profession, and ways we think archivists can make a positive climate impact."

 

"Overall, the conference was hugely successful. ProjectARCC members made new contacts and advocates across the country. Archivists are understanding that the issue of climate change affects everything that we do, as professionals, as individuals, as communities and across the world. We’re honored to be part of this movement to better understand climate impacts on our profession, and equally as importantly, what efforts we can take to act on climate change within and beyond it."


Storify: https://storify.com/historivist/projectarcc-at-saa15

Karen du Toit's insight:

Archivists making a positive contribution to the climate impact on the archival profession! 

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Tweets in danger of vanishing - Government News

By Julian Bajkowski:

On a typically mild Brisbane day in late August, hundreds of those tasked literally with preserving the history of government have converged at the river city’s convention centre to find a way forward in the digital age.

Often misunderstood as a slightly stuffy, almost archaic profession, in reality archivists remain the most highly trusted employees working in the public service because of their role preserving often highly sensitive documents.

And with good reason.

Cabinet papers, minutes of pivotal meetings and communications and correspondence that later define an era all pass through their hands.

But it’s not the paper world that’s creating a stir at the International Council of Archivists Congress 2012. It’s preserving Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and the exploding stream of social media traffic and digital documents through which an increasing number of governments are communicating to their constituents.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Archivists new role: focus on social media!

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Thriving in the Age of Empowered End Users: A Panel Discussion at SLA

by Cindy Shamel :

"As librarians and information professionals, we have an excellent track record for adapting to the ever-changing industry landscape. Despite ongoing discussions of obsolescence, the profession carries on. With the advent of microfilm in the 1930s, one college library committee posited that the book would become as obsolete as the horse and buggy. We adapted by becoming experts in microfilm technology and the opportunities it offered. Librarians sounded the alarm in the 1960s when the telephone came to the reference desk, concerned that users would simply call in their questions and never come to the library again. People still came to libraries, and info pros adapted by increasing levels of services so that now we include phone, email, online chat, and text messages.

Today, when end users freely search the medical literature through PubMed, legal cases with FindLaw, and the internet via Google, our role again seems threatened. The professional discussion remains robust, as illustrated by a Dialog search of what I broadly defined as library literature (ERIC, INSPEC, NTIS, Social SciSearch, Dissertation Abstracts Online, Gale Group Magazine Database, British Education Index, Gale Group Trade & Industry Database, and Library Literature & Information Science). Using the terms librarian? and google ANDed with synonyms for competition, with results ranked by year, a steady increase from one hit in 1997 to about 80 per year over the last 6 years appears. So, what’s the info pro to do? How can we thrive in the environment of the empowered user?

PROQUEST ASSEMBLES A PANEL

At the 2012 SLA conference, ProQuest brought together a powerful panel of information industry practitioners and thought leaders to discuss the issues. Panelists included Mary Ellen Bates, president and founder of Bates Info Services, Inc. and an expert in customized information research; Blanca Chou, associate director of the Information Resource Center at Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc.; Betty Edwards, senior research analyst in information resources and management at The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc.; and Roger Summit, founder of Dialog, who foresaw the paradigm shift that would be created by the development of online information services. Libby Trudell, a longtime member of the Dialog, and now ProQuest, management team, moderated the panel.

Trudell led the discussion, posing questions related to how information professionals can redefine their service offering and their value proposition, whether the industry is on the right track with discovery tools, and where the gaps or opportunities lie today. Panelists drew from their work experience and industry knowledge to offer wisdom and strategies for thriving in the age of empowered users, revealing several common threads and a few unique insights."

 

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Fight for the Future: Libraries, Tech Policy, and the Fate of Human Knowledge - video

Fight for the Future: Libraries, Tech Policy, and the Fate of Human Knowledge - video | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Andrew Mclaughlin:

"Librarians + technology = a personal nirvana. There is no more awesome set of people doing more important work than the librarians and their nerd allies at the bleeding edge of library tech -- they are engaged in an underappreciated struggle to work out how mankind is going to preserve, extend, share, and democratize the sum of human knowledge in our increasingly digital age. So I was really psyched to go a do a talk at the 2012 Library Technology Conference about the technological forces driving the great policy issues of our age, along with an argument about why and where the library community should be engaged. Bonus for me: The event was at Macalester College, where I spent my high school summers taking Russian while trying to look like something other than the huge dork I was.

Here's my keynote, "Fight for the Future: Libraries, Tech Policy, and the Fate of Human Knowledge."

 

Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/39110183

 

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AOTUS: Collector in Chief | Thinking About the Future of Information Professionals

RT @USNatArchives: What skills/characteristics are needed to be an #archivist? #AOTUS @dferriero offers his thoughts.

 

David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States: 

 

" The next generation of Information Professionals

 

- People with a broader background than was the case when I was a graduate student. In addition to history, archives and library science, other subject matter areas are important. Above all, we want people who can connect archival work with real life experiences.
- Technical savvy is a given to work in a modern archives. And by savvy, I mean not just experience with the latest technologies, but also a sense of excitement and curiosity about putting those technologies to work
- A tolerance for ambiguity—if you need a blueprint of what your job is going to be like in five years, archives might not be the best fit.
- Highly developed collaborative skills. Can you play well with others?
- People with a strong passion for working with people. A customer-driven organization such as the one we are creating needs a customer-driven staff."

 

Full-text keynote address here: http://blogs.archives.gov/aotus/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/ALISE-keynote-address-as-delivered1.pdf 

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A physical and moral defence for archivists | The National Archives blog

A physical and moral defence for archivists | The National Archives blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Posted by Andrew Janes:

"...it isn’t surprising that most people don’t know very much about what archivists do because the scope and responsibilities of the job vary quite a lot between different archives and between different roles within the same organisation. Some archivists work mostly with records made of paper and other ‘traditional’ materials but others work mainly or entirely with digital records. Some archivists, like me, spend a lot of time answering enquiries and talking to researchers, but others spend much less time doing that. 4 What we all have in common is our commitment to the records.

Sir Hilary Jenkinson, who was one of the most important British writers about archival theory and practice during the 20th century, 5 had much to say to about the role of archivists. According to Jenkinson, an archivist’s primary duty is the physical and moral defence of the records in his or her care. 6 Why is this defence ‘moral’ as well as physical? Archivists believe that preserving the intellectual properties of records and their relationships with one another 7 – which Jenkinson rather grandly terms a moral defence – is just as important as looking after the records physically."

Karen du Toit's insight:

In defence of archivists! What, why and how!

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10 Surprising Marketing Job Titles For The Next 10 Years - Forbes

10 Surprising Marketing Job Titles For The Next 10 Years - Forbes | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

This article is by Scott Redick, director of strategy at Heat, an independent advertising agency. Things change pretty quickly in the marketing industry.

[...]

 

7. Content Archivist

Competitive and legal pressure will require more demands for storing, indexing and retrieving the vast amount of content that brands produce. A content archivist will be the person everyone turns to when the CEO asks, “What was that one tweet we sent about that thing five years ago?”

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future job titles of librarians/archivists!

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Digital archivists: technological custodians of human history - Ars Technica

Digital archivists: technological custodians of human history - Ars Technica | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Chris Foreman:

Ars Technica"One of the biggest challenges in the field of digital librarianship is simply trying to evolve as fast as technology," Pike said, "because we need to also keep up..."

 

Robin Pike (certified archivist currently serving as a Digital Collections Librarian at the University of Maryland):

"We are the custodians of what has been created and are enabling access—ideally free and unlimited—for the future," Pike said. "No matter what is created and where it is created, if it is important, some librarian, archivist, or records manager is capturing it and saving it for the future. In addition to saving the digital objects, we need to make them accessible so people can use and reuse the materials."

"We are the custodians of human history."


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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New trend? Librarians, archivists & museum professionals ruling the world | ArchivesNext

Kate T:

"New trend?Librarians, archivists & museum professionals ruling the world | ArchivesNext http://t.co/eAGshlcC..."

 

"I’m referring to this almost ebullient post by the Library of Congress’ Butch Lazorchak on the Signal blog, “#sxswLAM: Libraries, Archives and Museums in an Interactive World.” It’s a beautiful vision, and it’s great to hear that participating in the South By Southwest Interactive Conference has given him this kind of warm rosy optimistic glow.

Butch’s post bolsters my claim that “blurring of organizational roles” is a significant trend for archives. In an earlier draft of my trends post I had a list of trends I wanted to see, and although I didn’t phrase it in quite the same way, “librarians, archivists & museum professionals ruling the world” is pretty close. It’s my hope (and Butch’s vision) that LAM professionals can emerge as leaders in the evolving digital world. But this will only happen if more of them engage in wider discussions, as some LAM representatives are doing."

 

Kate T's version of Trendswatch 2012 - The Archive's edition: http://www.archivesnext.com/?p=2608

 

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