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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Accessing historical archives as a disabled user; with recommendations

Accessing historical archives as a disabled user; with recommendations | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Viv Dunstan:

"I recently gave a talk to a conference for archivists on my perceptions as a disabled user of archives. I have a progressive neurological disease, and sometimes use a wheelchair. ...

[...]

...list of recommendations for archivists to improve accessibility. I will repeat these here, for the benefit of any reading:

Would ask archivists to consider how accessible their search rooms are, including the layout within the room itself. This is potentially of great benefit to physically disabled archive users, but a more accessible layout can benefit users in general as well, for example tables and chairs that are easier to move around, paper catalogues easier to access etc.As a counterpoint to that ask you to be more aware of the potential need for people to research at a distance, and do not always assume lengthy on-the-spot research is practical or the default approach, and consider enabling other modes of provision for usersTo that end make sure that online catalogues are as detailed as they can be, and improve them where necessaryAs well as archivist initiated digitisation projects archivists should consider supporting digitisation on demand, including permitting digital photography of records, whether a per page copying fee is charged for such photography, or waived for disability users"
Karen du Toit's insight:

Good checklist of points to consider for archives with regards accessibility! 

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Library program teaches technology to people with vision disabilities ...

A new, free program offered through the Macomb Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (MLBPH) aims to offer alternative coping methods for this and other low vision issues beginning June 12.

 

“In addition to being able to offer materials to those with low vision, we’re very happy to be able to offer classes to introduce technology and techniques to our patrons to help them be more productive at home or in the community,” Clinton-Macomb Library Head of Popular Materials Emily Kubash said.

Licensed clinical social worker and Work-Life Solutions counselor Sharon Lotoczky will facilitate the course as part of the Vision Network Program. The sessions will help those with low vision learn techniques and technology to improve their lives in a variety of different areas, from home life to real world navigation."

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Zimbabwe Libraries lead the way providing tools for visually impaired students | EIFL

Zimbabwe Libraries lead the way providing tools for visually impaired students | EIFL | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

#Libraries lead the way providing tools for visually impaired students: University of Zimbabwe #AFRICA via @EIFLnet http://t.co/JzrsEN23...

 

"The librarians at the University of Zimbabwe (UZ) wanted to better serve the students with visual impairments at their university. In collaboration with the EIFL-FOSS programme, they formed a partnership with UZ’s Disability Resource Centre (DRC) to implement real solutions resulting in increased access to online resources for the UZ’s students with disabilities. Their success was recognized by the Zimbabwe Ministry of Public Affairs, and the project has been nominated for a UN award."

 

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Emily Heuring's curator insight, April 26, 9:54 PM

Zimbabwe is improving it's educational resources for the visually impared. They are installing magnifying programs as well as programs that read text aloud into library computers and individual's laptops in order to allow those with poor eyesight access to online resources. They have also been extending these programs beyond libraries in order to reach more people. This will help their economy in the long  run by giving more people access to information and an education. 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 24, 9:49 AM

Libraries lead the way providing tools for visually impaired students | EIFL

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Making Ebooks Accessible | American Libraries Magazine

Making Ebooks Accessible | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Submitted by Christopher Harris:

"As we go hunting for the right ebook readers for our patrons, accessibility is one of the factors to consider. People with vision, dexterity, or cognitive disabilities need certain specific features, and ebook readers are all over the map in what they offer and how they offer it. But it’s not as complicated as it might seem, and there’s some help available."

 

"Here’s a basic breakdown of who needs what:

- For people who are blind, the text must be spoken aloud, and descriptions provided for images and graphs. Controls must be distinguishable by touch. (Some touchscreen devices now provide a way for controls to announce their function without activating them.)
- For people with low vision, the text must be high contrast and magnifiable ,or in a large, easy-to-read font.
- For people with cognitive disabilities, controls must be easy to use. Text must be able to be spoken aloud and highlighted as it is spoken.
- For people with dexterity impairments, controls must be easy to operate, and not require more than one action at a time, or complicated actions. Devices must be easy to lift, hold, and operate with one hand.
- For people with hearing loss, audible alerts and alarms should have a visible form as well. Any audio content should be available in text."


Via Stacey Py Flynn
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Library for people with disabilities set for launching

Library for people with disabilities set for launching: Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL), an organisation...

Global Disability Rights Library (GDRL), an organisation whose aim is to help people with disability find resources they can use to improve lives will be launched in Tanzania.

Speaking to journalists yesterday at Maelezo Auditorium, the programme manager for Global Disability Rights Library, Ms Andrea Shettle, said the project targets delivery of knowledge to individuals and organisations which can be used to strengthen their ability to serve their communities and promote disability

 

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