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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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One woman's incredible VHS collection will live forever on the Internet

One woman's incredible VHS collection will live forever on the Internet | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Marion Stokes taped the news for 30 years. Now the Internet Archive is digitizing her vision.

 

"When Marion Stokes passed away in 2012, she left behind a family and personal legacy. She also left 40,000 VHS and Betamax tapes in her Philadelphia home, filled with local and national news shows she’d dutifully recorded for three decades.

Last fall, her son, Michael Metelits, reached out to the Internet Archive, a San Francisco–based nonprofit focused on cataloging archived websites and digitizing cultural artifacts like TV shows, books, video, and live concerts.

Between 1976 and 2012, Stokes taped shows she thought might be important one day. Metelits says there were two triggers for her to start: The Iran hostage crisis of 1979, and CNN launching as a 24-hour news source. She wanted to catch news as it evolved. 

The Internet Archive took on her massive collection, and earlier this week, the first digitizations from the project were uploaded to the site for free download. It’s a talk show called Input, which Stokes coproduced with her husband, John Stokes Jr. The program aired Sunday mornings in Philadelphia between 1968 and 1971."

Karen du Toit's insight:

The Internet Archive digitising Marion Stokes' vision after she left behind a legacy of news television recordings!

The passion of one person left behind a legacy of heritage! Very valuable!

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A $1,500 DIY Robotic Book Scanner - By Roy Tennant / The Digital Shift

A $1,500 DIY Robotic Book Scanner - By Roy Tennant / The Digital Shift | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @sml8data: A $1,500 DIY Robotic Book Scanner - The Digital Shift http://t.co/CaFdzlJX #open...
Karen du Toit's insight:

"Recently a Google engineer unveiled a do-it-yourself (DIY) robotic book scanner. As reported by The Verge, Dany Qumsiyeh and a team of colleagues constructed it out of sheet metal, scanner parts, and an ordinary vacuum cleaner to build a page-turning scanner that only requires human intervention to put a book on the device. Scans are automatically sent to a connected laptop. “After a quick 40-second setup,” states the article, “it can digitize a 1000-page book in a little over 90 minutes.”

But perhaps even more amazing is that they have open sourced the plans and patents, thereby providing anyone the ability to do the same thing. Clearly, putting this together takes skills that many of us don’t have, but what it likely means is that some enterprising business will start making the robotic book scanner to capture a market heretofore not well served by scanners that cost tens of thousands of dollars."

 

Open source plans and patents: http://code.google.com/p/linear-book-scanner/

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Bringing History to the Future: How Libraries Are Reinventing Photo Collections | TechSoup for Libraries

Bringing History to the Future: How Libraries Are Reinventing Photo Collections | TechSoup for Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Libraries are using new technologies to are breathing new life into their digital photo collections. At the Future of Libraries 8.0 conference in San Francisco, librarians from the San Jose Public Library and the San Francisco Public Library discussed how they're using geocoding, crowdsourcing, and augmented reality with their digital photo archives."

[...]

"With Scan Jose open on your mobile phone or browser, you can view historic images from the collections of the San Jose Public Library and the Sourisseau Academy while actually visiting the locations those pictures were originally taken in. The San Jose Public Library encourages users to write comments and add to the collective history of the city. To use Scan Jose, simply enter www.scanjose.org on your smartphone or tablet browsers (iOS, Android, Blackberry, or Windows Mobile). Of course, you'll have to actually be physically in the city of San Jose to get the full effect."

 

"The best part about these projects is that it required no expenses on the part of the San Francisco Public Library. They simply advertised the projects via social media and people got excited and wanted to participate. The librarians at both SJPL and SFPL encourage other libraries to explore other ways to present their digital photo archives. You never know what a local history buff/programmer might come up with!"


Via Trudy Raymakers, Doug Mirams
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Worlds largest natural sound archive goes online - Tech2

Worlds largest natural sound archive goes online - Tech2 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it


A digital archive of thousands of natural and animal sounds has been put online by Cornell University's Macaulay Library.

 

Link here: http://tech2.in.com/news/science-and-technology/worlds-largest-natural-sound-archive-goes-online/703322

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great resource for researchers on animal & especially bird sounds!

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UI News: Expert on digital archiving and the law, by Kyle Rimkus - Newsroom America

UI News: Expert on digital archiving and the law, by Kyle Rimkus - Newsroom America | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

A MINUTE WITH LIBRARIAN KYLE RIMKUS ON DIGITAL ARCHIVING AND THE LAW:

 

"Editor’s note: In what has been described as a major victory for the digital humanities, a federal court earlier this month ruled against the Authors Guild in favor of the HathiTrust, a massive digital archive of library materials converted from print that is co-owned and managed by a partnership of more than 60 academic institutions, including the University of Illinois. Kyle Rimkus, preservation librarian at the U. of I., talked with News Bureau news editor Dusty Rhodes about the impact of this ruling."


Via NELLCO
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