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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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AMIA Online - 3 webinars about preservation of audiovisual heritage

AMIA is a nonprofit, international association dedicated to the preservation and use of moving image media. As the world’s largest association of professional media archivists, AMIA brings together a broad range of experts and institutions in a single forum to address the best ways to preserve our media heritage.

  AN INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL FORMATS 
AND STORAGE

This series focuses on digital file formats, storage, and transfer workflows. [Eight webinars]

  BEST PRACTICES FOR 
PERSONAL AUDIOVISUAL ARCHIVES

This series is directed to families and individuals with audiovisual collections they wish to preserve. [Two webinars]

  BEST PRACTICES FOR 
SMALL AUDIOVISUAL ARCHIVES

This series is directed to small institutions with audiovisual collections and limited staff. [Two webinars]


Karen du Toit's insight:

Looks good, but unfortunately at a prize!

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Archival Manoeuvres: Managing Digitization Projects - podcast Ep 10

More Podcast, Less Process is a podcast about archives, archivists, and the archival enterprise hosted by Jefferson Bailey and Joshua Ranger. More information: keepingcollections.org/more-podcast-less-process/

 

Episode 10: Archival Manoeuvres: Managing Digitization Projects

Miwa Yokoyama (Digital Project Manager, Carnegie Hall) and Mitch Brodsky (Digital Archives Manager, New York Philharmonic) visit Josh and Jefferson to discuss their experiences managing archival digitization projects.

 

(Internet Archive, iTunes, or direct download)

Karen du Toit's insight:

Digitization projects

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Stanford U. Libraries Begins Building New Tool To Assist in Creation of Digital Collection Websites - Spotlight | LJ INFOdocket

Stanford U. Libraries Begins Building New Tool To Assist in Creation of Digital Collection Websites - Spotlight | LJ INFOdocket | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Feedback from librarians, curators, faculty, and other stakeholders has made it clear that there is a strong demand for feature-rich collection sites and, as the volume of digitized content continues to grow, that this demand will continue to outweigh our resources for producing them with a custom-built approach.

To address this, in the first quarter of 2014, SUL began building an application called Spotlight.

Spotlight is a Blacklight plugin that enables librarians, curators, and researchers who are responsible for digital collections to create attractive, feature-rich websites that showcase these collections. Spotlight leverages the rich resource discovery capabilities of Blacklight and extends it to allow curators to feature content from a repository system by enhancing it with rich narrative and context. Spotlight has similarities to existing exhibit solutions but seeks to expand on current models to more tightly integrate with repository infrastructures and bring equally strong focus on search results, objects, and supporting intellectual scaffolding.

The lead designer on the effort, Gary Geisler, took a user-centered approach to conceiving of a highly generalizable solution that took into account Stanford’s local needs as well as feedback from peers at other cultural heritage institutions who are searching for a similar solution. The project planning artifacts, which include concept documents, requirements, detailed personas and mockups, are openly available."

 

 Complete Blog Post by Stu Snydman & Gary Geislerto Learn More, View Video With Accomplishments from Sprint 1 https://library.stanford.edu/blogs/digital-library-blog/2014/02/stanford-begins-development-spotlight
Karen du Toit's insight:

Enhanced digitization via Spotlight!

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Digitization 101: University of Minnesota Fair Use Checklist Tool (or Thinking Through Fair Use)

Digitization 101: University of Minnesota Fair Use Checklist Tool (or Thinking Through Fair Use) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The University Libraries at the University of Minnesota have an interactive tool to help people discern whether a specific use of copyrighted material would be considered Fair Use.  This tool allows a person to think through her answers and create documentation that can be saved (actually sent to the person via email).  Th UMN web site does not keep any of the information.  This is a tool that is worth bookmarking and using!"

Karen du Toit's insight:

Copyright and fair use!

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Future archives: problematizing digital archives – Opinions – Archival Platform

Carolien Greyling:

"Archives are only useful when individuals have access to the information stored in them. A way in which some archives are limited is that the information they house is not available to people who live in places far away. In South Africa our National Archives are housed in Pretoria, while provincial archives are housed in provincial capitals such as Polokwane, Bloemfontein and Cape Town. For individuals living in towns far away from capitals getting to these places might be very difficult or impossible.  It would seem that a digital archive would be a great benefit to a person living in a remote location." 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Thoughts around the digitization of archives. Well worth a read!

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Combining America's Digitized Libraries, All In One Place : NPR - Digital Public Library of America

Combining America's  Digitized Libraries, All In One Place : NPR - Digital Public Library of America | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Libraries have been digitizing their collections for years, but the materials can be hard to find. Enter the Digital Public Library of America.

[...]

"Part of a series, Keys To The Whole World: American Public Libraries

Buried in the archives of America's public and academic libraries are historical treasures — old papers, photos and records — that flesh out a detailed picture of our past.

Many libraries are trying to make it easier to find that material by putting digital copies online. But with so many different websites and databases to turn to, it may still require a research degree in Web searching to find anything. This spring, a program launched that aims to put all that great stuff in one place: the Digital Public Library of America.

The DPLA has already drawn scholars like Lincoln Mullen, a graduate student at Brandeis University who is researching the history of religious conversion in the United States. Mullen says the DPLA uncovered some hard-to-find documents at the College of Charleston in South Carolina — handwritten letters by a slave owner, William H.W. Barnwell, in which Barnwell discussed religious instruction to slaves and how the North misunderstood the South in these matters."

Karen du Toit's insight:

More about the The Digital Public Library of America!

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Andrea Barnaby's curator insight, August 29, 2013 6:35 AM

Digitisation makes primary information in the reach of everyone.

Darryl Barnaby's curator insight, August 29, 2013 6:53 AM

Digitization puts primary resources in the reach of everyone.

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Accessing historical archives as a disabled user; with recommendations

Accessing historical archives as a disabled user; with recommendations | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Viv Dunstan:

"I recently gave a talk to a conference for archivists on my perceptions as a disabled user of archives. I have a progressive neurological disease, and sometimes use a wheelchair. ...

[...]

...list of recommendations for archivists to improve accessibility. I will repeat these here, for the benefit of any reading:

Would ask archivists to consider how accessible their search rooms are, including the layout within the room itself. This is potentially of great benefit to physically disabled archive users, but a more accessible layout can benefit users in general as well, for example tables and chairs that are easier to move around, paper catalogues easier to access etc.As a counterpoint to that ask you to be more aware of the potential need for people to research at a distance, and do not always assume lengthy on-the-spot research is practical or the default approach, and consider enabling other modes of provision for usersTo that end make sure that online catalogues are as detailed as they can be, and improve them where necessaryAs well as archivist initiated digitisation projects archivists should consider supporting digitisation on demand, including permitting digital photography of records, whether a per page copying fee is charged for such photography, or waived for disability users"
Karen du Toit's insight:

Good checklist of points to consider for archives with regards accessibility! 

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Digitising your collection – Part 4: Scanning and handling tips

Digitising your collection – Part 4: Scanning and handling tips | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Also of interest:Digitising your collection – Part 3: Technical specifications (http://archivesoutside.records.nsw.gov.au/digitising-your-collection-part-3-technical-specifications/) ; Digitising your collection – Part 2; The Golden Rule of Digitisation (http://archivesoutside.records.nsw.gov.au/digitising-your-collection-part-2-the-golden-rule-of-digitisation/)  – Part 1: Project Planning (http://archivesoutside.records.nsw.gov.au/digitising-your-collection-part-1-project-planning/)

 

 

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Judge Says Fair Use Protects Universities in Book-Scanning Project | Threat Level | Wired.com

Judge Says Fair Use Protects Universities in Book-Scanning Project | Threat Level | Wired.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"A federal judge on Wednesday threw out a copyright infringement lawsuit against universities that participated in a massive book-digitization project in conjunction with Google without permission from rights holders.

U.S. District Judge Harold Baer of New York dismissed an infringement lawsuit brought by the Authors Guild and other writers’ guilds, saying the universities had a fair use defense. The guild accused the University of California, University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Cornell University and University of Michigan of wanton copyright infringement for scanning and placing the books into the so-called HathiTrust Digital Library.

The trust consists of 10 million digital volumes, 73 percent of which are protected by copyright. The trust provides full-text searches only with a rights holder’s permission, and gives full-text access for readers with “certified print disabilities,” Baer said."

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Library Intelligencer » The Scholar/Librarian Goes Digital: New Times Require New Skills and Aptitudes

IFLA Conference Paper:

 

Gillian M McCombs:

 

"The digital age may well be considered a golden age for Special Collections. Treasures that have long been locked in vaults and available only to researchers onsite are now accessible at the click of a mouse from anywhere in the world. However, for every stunning rare book, photograph or art work that is available electronically, thousands more are still inaccessible. Some libraries have been slow to realize the potential for digital access and have not built the infrastructure needed to put these collections out into the public eye. This paper addresses questions such as: are we hiring the right people for Special Collections; are we retooling current curators so that they are technically adept; are we providing our Special Collections Libraries with necessary resources such as marketing and graphics design staff to develop websites for digital exhibits; have they developed a strategic plan that outlines their long-term goals for incorporating technology; what are the consortial opportunities that will help our Special Collections Libraries; are we working closely enough with library schools and rare book programs to ensure that graduates have the skills, aptitude and attitude that we need?"

source: INFODocket

 

http://conference.ifla.org/sites/default/files/files/papers/wlic2012/87-mccombs-en.pdf