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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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BiblioTech: The First All-Digital Public Library in U.S. Opens One Week From Today in Bexar County, Texas | LJ INFOdocket

BiblioTech: The First All-Digital Public Library in U.S. Opens One Week From Today in Bexar County, Texas | LJ INFOdocket | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
BiblioTech: First All-Digital Public #Library in U.S. Opens This Saturday in Bexar County, Texas http://t.co/ZanlwV5IwW #libraries

 

Bibilotech, the first all-digital public library in the U.S. opens one week from today (September 14, 2014) in Bexar County (San Antonio), Texas. 

 

The library has been offering library card registration for a few weeks via their web site.

According to the web site, BiblioTech will offer materials from:

eBooks from 3M Cloud Library (10,000 titles at launch)Audiobooks from One-Click DigitalLanguage instruction from Mango

The library also offers:

500 e-readers (100 pre-loaded enhanced e-readers for children) 50 computer stations, 25 laptops and 25 tablets to use on-site

BiblioTech provides access to a large selection of reference and article databases via TexShare from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Sadly, these resources are poorly marked on the library’s web site. They deserve enumeration and explanation not to mention making them easier to find in the first place.

We also hope BiblioTech does better discovering and organizing high-quality open web resources that are often free to access and use. At the moment, only four resources are listed and two of them are listed incorrectly."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Description of the content and some shortfalls that need to be addressed!

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Alexandria 2.0: One Millionaire's Quest to Build the Biggest Library on Earth | Internet Archive | Wired.com

Alexandria 2.0: One Millionaire's Quest to Build the Biggest Library on Earth | Internet Archive | Wired.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Matt SDimon:

"Brewster Kahle never had to work again after selling his company to Amazon for a quarter-billion dollars in the dot-com boom. But he then began working on building the world's biggest digital library, earning him a spot in the Internet Hall of Fame.

 

Brewster Kahle is taking the steady-as-she-goes approach to building a library on the internet, gingerly skirting around copyright minefields, and scavenging the easy (copyright free) leftovers."

[...]

"So the Archive takes whatever it can get. No information is too obscure — Kahle just got back from Bali, where he helped digitize everything ever written in Balinese. And nothing is wasted — every physical book that is digitized is sent across the San Francisco Bay to Richmond, where it’s added to one of many climate-controlled shipping containers.

So far Kahle has archived 500,000 books, with another 500,000 in process. Though he admits he’ll never get there, Kahle wants to collect one of every book ever written.

“I think it’s a supply problem,” he says. “It’s not a demand problem. People want it…. People aren’t really stupid out there. They may be very particular, very peculiar, and they may not be interested in the things you are, or maybe even vote the same way you do, but they’re interested in what they’re interested in.”

So grows the second library of Alexandria, a collection with something for everyone. Except for the invading hordes. Not that they’d have any idea where to begin lighting fires."


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Digital Public Library of America faces uncertainty over functions, by Chris Meadows

Digital Public Library of America faces uncertainty over functions, by Chris Meadows | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Chris Meadows

"On MIT’s Technology Review, Nicholas Carr takes an in-depth look at the creation of the Digital Public Library of America, an attempt at a non-commercial universal electronic library (which I also mentioned last month) that hopes to provide universal access to as much of human knowledge as it can. Carr first looks at Google’s attempt to create Google Book Search, and the negotiated settlement that was thrown out as too overreaching. Though Google is moving ahead with its legal defense, the search market has shifted toward social networking meaning that a book search might not be as attractive to Google as it once was."

 

"But the biggest problem facing the DPLA may be the same one facing Google Books: the question of copyright. While the DPLA’s nonprofit status does open some doors to it that remain shut to Google Books (such as possibly working out the kind of licensing agreements with publishers that have given the commercial Google such trouble), it doesn’t give it carte blanche to offer works that are still under copyright. Having a truly comprehensive digital library could require Congress to pass new laws."

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Judge Says Fair Use Protects Universities in Book-Scanning Project | Threat Level | Wired.com

Judge Says Fair Use Protects Universities in Book-Scanning Project | Threat Level | Wired.com | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"A federal judge on Wednesday threw out a copyright infringement lawsuit against universities that participated in a massive book-digitization project in conjunction with Google without permission from rights holders.

U.S. District Judge Harold Baer of New York dismissed an infringement lawsuit brought by the Authors Guild and other writers’ guilds, saying the universities had a fair use defense. The guild accused the University of California, University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Cornell University and University of Michigan of wanton copyright infringement for scanning and placing the books into the so-called HathiTrust Digital Library.

The trust consists of 10 million digital volumes, 73 percent of which are protected by copyright. The trust provides full-text searches only with a rights holder’s permission, and gives full-text access for readers with “certified print disabilities,” Baer said."

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Jeffrey Schnapp's Library Test Kitchen course tries out new ideas for libraries | Harvard Magazine Jul-Aug 2012

Jeffrey Schnapp's Library Test Kitchen course tries out new ideas for libraries | Harvard Magazine Jul-Aug 2012 | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
An innovative course yields new products, services, and experiences that model the possible future of libraries.

 

by Jonathan Shaw:

“WHAT IF YOU THOUGHT seriously about the library as a laboratory, as a place where people do things, where they make things?” asks Jeffrey Schnapp, addressing his “Library Test Kitchen” class. Libraries as centers of knowledge and learning have a rich history—but an uncharted future. The digital revolution, besides changing the nature of books, is transforming the role of libraries in preserving and disseminating information. “What if the Library of Congress were to become a digital library?” continues Schnapp. “What, then, is the role of the physical public library? This is a source of enormous anxiety at the local level because public libraries” face increasing political pressure, including budget cuts, but “play absolutely fundamental civic roles, often as the only public space that remains in smaller communities.”

[...]

"By semester’s end, the brainstorming sessions had generated dozens of good ideas, and a few had become student projects: Biblio, a conceptualization of a hand-held device for scanning books that tracks and shares research and even makes bibliographic recommendations for further study (see the online video); Timeslice, a “graphical electronic bulletin board” that lets library users post event announcements to a community calendar that incorporates digital graphics; Neo-Carrel, a study chair with a raised platform in front that doubles as a laptop stand and a comfortable place to rest one’s head for a nap (now installed in Lamont library); and a WiFi cold spot, a radically designed room for reflection or refuge from an increasingly connected world.

“We think this is an opportunity to be real catalysts for thoughtful change that can’t easily come from other quarters,” explains Schnapp. “Because we’re not librarians, but instead a community of artists, scholars, engineers—people interested in knowledge—we come at the questions a little bit differently. So we think we can be innovative and breathe some fresh air into a conversation that often is about how many jobs are going to be cut, or what will happen to all the space that is freed up once the stacks move out to the Harvard Depository. That’s a conversation that may have to happen, but it would be a tragedy if that were the only framework in which we thought about the possibilities for enhancing the mission of libraries.”


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TheDartmouth.com: Darnton discusses future of libraries

By Amanda Young:

NEWS: Robert Darnton discusses future of libraries http://t.co/XUPL1y55...

 

'Despite a number of obstacles, the Digital Public Library of America, an open-access digital library, is projected to launch in April 2013, making the United States’ cultural heritage available worldwide, according to Robert Darnton, a Harvard University professor and the director of the Harvard University Library. Darnton spoke in Filene Auditorium in Monday’s inaugural Donoho Colloquium titled “The Digital Public Library of America and the Digital Future.”

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