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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Indigenous Libraries As Social Venues · Global Voices

Indigenous Libraries As Social Venues · Global Voices | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

“One thing is that books satisfy users’ curiosity, and a very different one that is that it might represent the identity of the community them belong to”. Argentinian librarian Daniel Canosa questions the role and function of local libraries. On Infotecarios network he writes:

"Indigneous libraries [should] generate knowledge from local and community participation, provide a way of understanding, that in time is a way of building identity. The thing is if what libraries provide represent what each community knows, if what a librarian builds with their community allows a true affinity with people's historic memory. This is not about new ideas, but things should move forward questioning those ideas.
[...]
If libraries spread people's production from their own places, then not only the elites won't be then only ones in the world of information." (translation)

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries as builders and keepers of identity of a community!

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From libraries to laundromats: Ingenious community partnerships promote literacy - EdSource Today

From libraries to laundromats: Ingenious community partnerships promote literacy - EdSource Today | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Galvanized by a national reading campaign, communities across California are launching innovative partnerships that are resulting in new early literacy programs in schools, libraries and even laundromats.

“There’s a lot of books here, really good books,” said 9-year-old Melanie Garcia-Macias, who sat with her back to a big red bookshelf at the end of a long line of washing machines at the Clean Express Coin Laundry in Richmond one recent Wednesday. A copy of “The Night Before Christmas” was splayed open on her lap.

“You can take one home, but you have to bring one back or bring one from your home to replace it,” she said. “I think it’s a pretty good plan.”

The plan – giving students free access to engaging titles while their parents fluff and fold – is just one of the ingenious ways communities are opening doors to literacy through the nationalCampaign for Grade Level Reading, sponsored by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

[...]

In other communities, the campaign has had a more direct impact.

In Fresno, for example, the head of the public housing authority was so swayed by what he heard about the importance of reading on grade level by third grade that he formed a partnership with First 5 Fresno to bring Americorps volunteers into the housing developments and work with parents and young children on pre-literacy activities like reading together and creating artwork.

Stockton librarian Suzy Daveluy said she knew children in her city were struggling with reading, based on the number of help requests she got from parents. But she didn’t realize how bad the literacy crisis had become until she met with national campaign leaders.

“What I can credit the campaign with is opening my eyes up to some of the realities that our children are facing,” Daveluy said.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Projects to address issues in the community > definitely a place for libraries to get heavily infested in!

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Linda Denty's curator insight, August 6, 2013 8:29 PM

What a fantastic idea.

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Libraries in Brimbank have a constructive program

Libraries in Brimbank have a constructive program | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Brimbank libraries have a range of children programs available to encourage social interaction, learning and fun with the Lego Club being one of them.

Aimed at children aged 7-12 years who would like to build and display their Lego works in the library, the free club runs weekly at the Sunshine and Sydenham libraries.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great idea!

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Creating Communities Through Makerspaces by Buffy Hamilton / Atlanta Mini Maker Faire 2012

Creating Communities Through Libraries and Makerspaces Presented by Buffy J. Hamilton, The Unquiet Librarian 


Via Buffy J. Hamilton
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Local Library or Management Service Organization? (SSIR)

Local Library or Management Service Organization? (SSIR) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Indiana’s Foellinger Foundation is using free library services to boost grantee effectiveness.  [...]

The Foellinger Foundation realized that nonprofits might be able to use the library in a similar way to an MSO. A library is customer service-oriented; it specializes in managing and distributing information and training to a wide variety of people and institutions; and people are accustomed to it operating as a center for learning. The foundation saw that the library budget could cover the overhead and infrastructure, and realized that with some additional funding, the library could expand its offerings and eliminate the need to fund an independent, service-based nonprofit."

 

Taking library engagement with community to a whole new level.

DW

 

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Canadian Libraries: Innovating and creating inclusive services

Canadian Libraries: Innovating and creating inclusive services | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Canadian Libraries: Innovating and Creating Inclusive Services Pilar Martinez Edmonton Public Library Executive Director, Public Services Canadian Library Association Vice-President/President-Elect...

 

Final thoughts by:

Pilar Martinez & Kenneth Williment

 

"The traditional service development process provides a number of ways in which library staff can internally generate programs and services to meet library staffs’ perceptions of community needs. Community-led service development provides a new set of tools which library staff can build upon to ensure the continued relevance of public libraries that truly meet community needs. Unfortunately, systems which continue to guess at community needs will run the risk of being left in the 20th century. This may lead to the development of two tiered library service development, where 1. dynamic library systems respond to community needs beyond those of traditional library users while 2. other systems minimally engage users and try to maintain their relevance to community by marketing and informing communities of ‘their’ services.

As with all other professions, industries and organizations, public libraries need to embrace innovation, thus ensuring that their services are relevant to both funders and the people they are meant to serve. The discussions and innovative practices occurring in Canadian public libraries are exciting because – ultimately – change will occur. The question will always remain – who will determine how public libraries will adapt? It will either happen proactively and internally, and hopefully based on collaborative decisions made with library staff and their communities – or else passive public libraries will be at the mercy of the outside forces imposing the change."

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Library as Incubator Project - libraries & artists working together

Library as Incubator Project - libraries & artists working together | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

@NorfolkLibs @TheForumNorwich Museums & libraries well placed to collaborate, check out this project http://t.co/yDmoB5BB.

 

The Library as Incubator Project was created by Erinn Batykefer, Laura Damon-Moore, and Christina Endres, three graduate students at the UW-Madison School of Library and Information Studies.

 

The Project highlights the ways that libraries and artists can work together and features:

 

Visual artists, performing artists, and writers who use libraries in their communities for inspiration, information, and as gallery spaceCollections, libraries and library staff that incubate the arts, and the ways that artists can use them effectivelyFree-to-share resources for librarians looking to incubate the arts at their librariesIdeas for artists looking to connect with their communities through library programming

At a time in which both libraries and arts organizations are often having to do more with less, it makes sense for these two parts of our culture to support each other. The Library as Incubator Project calls attention to one of the many reasons libraries are important to our communities and our culture, and provides a dynamic online forum for sharing ideas."

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Is It About Us, or Is It About Them? Libraries and Collections in a Patron-Driven World | ALA Editions

Is It About Us, or Is It About Them? Libraries and Collections in a Patron-Driven World | ALA Editions | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

New post to the blog from @Looptopper on the tension between librarian selection and a patron-driven acquisition http://t.co/LH7LTCa4...

 

"As budgets get tighter and prices keep rising, libraries are increasingly forced to think about ways to minimize waste in their collections. A sudden sharp interest in patron-driven acquisition solutions is one indicator of this concern, the idea being that when we let patrons select the books we buy, the less likely we are to buy books they don't want.

 

But this trend gives rise to deeply uncomfortable questions.

What does "waste" actually mean in a library collection—especially in a research library?

Can we ever know for certain that an uncirculated book won't be important at some point in the future?

Won't patron-driven processes lead to a breakdown in the collection's coherence?

And if we're just here to "give the people what they want," what meaningful function do librarians serve?

Do we just become shipping-and-receiving clerks?"

 

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More Data for Your Dollar | Data-Driven Libraries, by Ian Chant - Library Journal

More Data for Your Dollar | Data-Driven Libraries, by Ian Chant - Library Journal | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

In the past few months, LJ has looked at how libraries of all kinds can improve the way they serve their patrons by gathering better data on what their communities want and need. 

[...]

“Librarians need to be gathering data on the people who are not coming into libraries,” says Gary Price, editor of infoDOCKET.

[...]

Using data to drive decisions about what programming to offer and where to spend resources isn’t just for big regional players. With numerous assets available for free or little cost and requiring little special training or technical expertise, the knowledge librarians need to make big changes in small communities is already largely at their disposal. And while being able to access those statistics and make the most of them are two different things, if any field is prepared to do its own dirty work in discerning what complicated information means and how best to put it to use, it is librarianship."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Practical suggestions on how to collect data about the library community!

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The Promise of Libraries Transforming Communities | American Libraries Magazine

The Promise of Libraries Transforming Communities | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Saturday morning’s panel session, “The Promise of Libraries Transforming Communities,” hit home with an engaged crowd and a passionate panel. The ALA President’s Program was cosponsored by the Public Information Office.

ALA Past President Molly Raphael opened the session by focusing on the community’s aspirations, noting, “Aspiration looks for the best in us, and brings people together. There’s a tendency to say 'We have a problem. How to we fix it?’ But turning outward is how to do something with a community rather than to them.”

Each of the panelists (including President Maureen Sullivan, ALA Past President Molly Raphael, Iowa State Librarian Mary Wegner, Penn State Abingdon Associate Librarian Alexia Hudson-Ward, and the Harwood Institute’s Rich Harwood) spoke about how they had used methods learned in Harwood Institute workshops to engage their communities, whether a city, a university, or a school."


Via Doug Mirams
Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries transforming communities > future of the library!

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Doug Mirams's curator insight, July 1, 2013 8:29 AM

Best quote from the panel "The Promise of Libraries Transforming Communities" comes from Rich Harwood, of the Harwood Institute, 

 

“We cannot become captives of our building. You work as much in the community as in your building.”
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Community libraries for the 21st century

Community libraries for the 21st century | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
RT @WEAadulted: The importance of Community libraries for the 21st century http://t.co/5sJlRuxh

 

"Arts Council England and the LGA have developed guiding principles which will assist local authorities who are considering reviewing the delivery of their library services to work with their communities.

Some of these guiding principles include:

the importance of local authorities taking a strategic view across their whole library servicethat there is no one model recommended for community involvement – locally appropriate solutions usually work bestthat community libraries are testing new approaches to library service delivery

You can read more about the guiding principles in the report: http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/what-we-do/supporting-libraries/community-libraries-research/

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Guiding principles for local authorities - worth a look!

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Project Profiles Your Friendly Neighborhood Library: An Inviting Space, a Family Place

Project Profiles Your Friendly Neighborhood Library: An Inviting Space, a Family Place | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Stacey A. Aldrich:

"When an initiative known as Family Place introduced a new children’s programming model that encourages libraries to go beyond summer reading programs and story hours to reach their full potential as community hubs, the California State Library took notice.

As a collaboration that began in 1996 between New York’s Middle Country Public Library and the now-defunct nonprofit Libraries for the Future, the Family Place model promotes spaces within libraries that focus on the learning and literacy of children ages 0–3, while also supporting the needs of the entire family. Family Place principles have now been refined and translated into a replicable framework that gives all libraries the chance to look at their children’s services in a fresh way. More than 300 sites in 23 states are currently part of the expanding Family Place Libraries network.

Stacey Aldrich, state librarian for the California State Library, was impressed by Family Place when she was introduced to the concept through Libraries for the Future.

"Family Place is amazing," says Aldrich. "They really make libraries think about the environments they’re creating for families. Family Place library spaces are designed for the family to fully engage and interact—parents and caregivers, as well as children."


Via Buffy J. Hamilton
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"Bad Libraries Build Collections, Good Libraries Build Services, Great Libraries Build Communities"

"Virtual Dave" Lankes is a professor at Syracuse University's School of Information Studies:

The tweet that led to this post:

“Bad Libraries build collections. Good libraries build services (of which a collection is only one). Great libraries build Communities”

 

"There is nothing that says that good and great libraries don’t or can’t build collections. It is a matter of focus. If librarians focus solely or disproportionately on the collection, that is bad...If we are talking focus, what is the difference between bad libraries and good ones? Good libraries focus on users. That is they evaluate the utility of the collection [in] relation to user needs. What do people want and need in terms of the collection, and how does that balance with all the other things the library does (reference, programming, digital resources, instruction, etc.). Here not only do we look at user data such as circulation and such, but the whole user experience."


Via Miguel Mimoso Correia, Robin Illsley, Errol A. Adams JD/MLS
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Libraries build communities | Reading, Writing, Research

Libraries build communities | Reading, Writing, Research | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

DMGuion:

"Libraries are about more than books or reading. They also sponsor concerts, lectures, workshops, classes, and similar events."

 

"Many libraries have auditoriums and offer various kinds of concerts, plays, or lectures. Many libraries have space for exhibiting art and perhaps a collection to display in it. Whether it has its own art collection or not, it can offer its exhibit space to both local and traveling arts organizations.
Libraries usually have meeting rooms, where all sorts of clubs and interest groups can gather. In today’s economy, workshops on various aspects of job hunting may draw people in to the library who otherwise may not have thought to use it."

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Library reflects our community values - Portland Tribune

Library reflects our community values - Portland Tribune | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Portland Tribune

Library reflects our community values

A new Cascade Policy Institute report calls on Multnomah County to hand over operations of its library system to a private contractor, or institute user fees, as alternatives to a...

 

"I would argue that cost and efficiency aren’t the only premises on which to judge an organization. I believe we should also consider a deeper and more meaningful question: What values should a community’s library reflect?

Public libraries exist to provide free, equal access to information and services to everyone. While many library users do live comfortably, many don’t. In Multnomah County, one in five residents younger than age 18 live below the poverty level; nearly half of recent library survey respondents reported household income less than the county’s median.

Library services are available to all of them. The public library is a unique place where the collective riches and wisdom of the world are not shuttered to those who cannot pay."

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What do Americans want from their libraries? Here’s our chance to find out | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

This study would be valuable worldwide as well: We will be following:

 

"What does your community want and need from a library? If you’re a librarian, chances are you’ve made efforts to find out, to strategically plan, to adjust services to local interests and changing needs.

What does your community want and need from a library? If you’re a librarian, chances are you’ve made efforts to find out, to strategically plan, to adjust services to local interests and changing needs. Rarely, though, do any of us get to see a broad view of our library community through the filter of independent data.

The Pew Internet & American Life Project is going to give us that view. Over the next three years, new research will investigate the role of libraries in the digital age, focusing on the ways libraries serve their users and their communities. Supported by a $1.4 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the study will be implemented by the Pew Internet Project, a nonpartisan “fact tank” that conducts nationwide surveys and qualitative research to help us understand the evolution of internet use."

The grant will allow researchers to concentrate on libraries in a way they never have before. “It’s enormously exciting to be doing something very focused on libraries and librarians because they are primary stakeholders of our work,” says Lee Rainie, director of the Pew Internet Project. “I know from all the conversations I’ve had with librarians how interested they are to find out where they stand in the world, what services people expect of them, and where they might fit into the world of ebooks.”

 

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