The Information Professional
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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Librarians On YouTube: About this blog

Librarians On YouTube: About this blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"... there is a definite archetype that has been established within our culture when it comes to what a librarian is "supposed" to look/act like, and that figure has permeated the representation of this field for more years than I care to count ... Whether it be film and television, or more modern media outlets like video games and the internet, you can find the librarians' profession portrayed (even ridiculed) with the same basic broad strokes. So, not to put too fine a point on it, but that's where this blog comes in ... THE PLAN Ever since I myself (full disclosure!) began pursuing a Master's Degree in order to join the ranks of the full-fledged librarian, I've become fascinated with the portrayal of this profession in popular culture, particularly those depictions which have made their way onto Youtube ... As such, I decided long ago to begin cataloging as many instances of these representations as I could find on the popular video-sharing site. A daunting task, to be sure, but I gladly accept the challenge ... And, truth be told, there are a LOT more portrayals of librarianship on there than I ever could have imagined! Of course, there's plenty of the familiar (i.e. unflattering) stereotypes on there, but dig deep enough and you can actually find some honest-to-goodness attempts to portray the profession in a positive light (some posted by librarians themselves, some not); you just need to take the time to look ... or follow this blog, either one ;) These portrayals can consist of fictitious characters (television, cartoons, movies, etc.) or real-life flesh-and-blood librarians (news stories, promotional videos, vlogs, etc.) ... Whatever the genre, whatever the format, I'm just looking for YouTube videos that someone out there felt was worth the time and effort to post for a world-wide audience as a representation of the profession (either in a positive or negative light)!" 
Karen du Toit's insight:

A stunning collection of portrayals of librarians found on YouTube!

Well done, Alessandro!

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Is it the end of an era for librarian blogging? « thewikiman

Is it the end of an era for librarian blogging? « thewikiman | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Yeah, this: “@theREALwikiman: Is it the end of an era for librarian blogging? http://t.co/DlbjoTEoSa”;

 

Lack of time is the biggest reason given for not blogging these days, and that makes a lot of sense. But I think it might be a changing of the guard, rather than an overall slow-down – a bunch of new professionals becoming older professionals, and newer ones attacking the biblioblogosphere with a fervor in their place. If we interact online in loosely defined sets (in my case, it’s largely ‘the people who were new professionals in 2009 when I went to the new professionals conference’) then it stands to reason that there would be a collective ebb and flow in our activity. As we get up the career ladder we become busier and have less time to blog, and we’re on similar cycles of activity, commitments, and enthusiasm…


So if you blog, do you blog less now than you used to? Is it the end of an era for librarian blogging? And if so, to what do you attribute this – is it just lack of time, or are there other reasons too?

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interesting discussion point > is it slowing down?

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Libraries Changed My Life

Libraries Changed My Life | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Real life accounts from library patrons whose lives have been changed for the better by libraries.

 

Libraries Changed My Life (LCML) is the brainchild of two librarians from two parts of the country. Ingrid is a children’s and teen librarian from New York City. Natalie is a systems librarian from rural Florida. Together we’re hoping to create a place where people can tell their library stories, and those who are questioning the value of libraries can see their amazing impact. LCML is an independent, grassroots movement to spread library love across the country.

Why we’re here:

Libraries are valuable—and valued. In addition to traditional services like book lending, research help and children’s programs (still the services Americans value most), libraries offer free wifi, technology training, free or low-cost public meeting spaces, affordable printing, access to music and the arts, and other services our neighborhoods need.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Libraries are valubale - accounts from patrons!

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Finding Hidden Treasure: a Cache of Librarian Blogs

Finding Hidden Treasure: a Cache of Librarian Blogs | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
by Sarah Deringer, Head Editor, INALJ Mississippi Finding Hidden Treasure: a Cache of Librarian Blogs Every great once in awhile I find a collection of good blogs to follow, and this week I found four...
Karen du Toit's insight:
Four good librarian blogs to follow!
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Job Hunter's Web Guide: Archives Gig | Hiring Librarians

Job Hunter's Web Guide: Archives Gig | Hiring Librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

This week we're showcasing a resource for the archivists out there. [...] Meredith Lowe, and her awesome resource: Archives Gig.

 

Link: http://archivesgig.livejournal.com/

 

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great resource for archivists in the US.

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Edublog Awards nominations 2012 @ gwynethjones - The Daring Librarian

Edublog Awards nominations 2012 @ gwynethjones - The Daring Librarian | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
"Because I get SO much more from the Edublog Award process learning about and from new teachers, librarians, administrators, etc it has been a super game changer [...] for me! Seriously, it blows my mind!
NEXT year for this I've got a new idea...I've created a new Sqworl group to save all those amazing blogs & educational sites I run across that I'm keeping an eye on to make next year's noms EASIER and hopefully faster! "
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This is how we do it: Social media at Christchurch City Libraries

This is how we do it: Social media at Christchurch City Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Posted by Donna:

" [...] discuss how we at Christchurch City Libraries use social media – what we think is important, what we do, and why we do it. Hopefully it opens up a dialogue amongst Kiwi librarians. Wouldn’t it be grand if our information community were more forthcoming about sharing information on making the best use of social media?"

 

Topics covered in the article:

 

"- Many voices

- We talk about all sorts of things – events, new books, new stuff on the website.

- Content is king

- Made you look (Twitter)

- Looking at the tools and processes

- The power of the image

- The social catalogue

- A reading list on social media in New Zealand public libraries"

 

 

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What a new teacher librarian can make!

What a new teacher librarian can make! | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"One of the ongoing joys of working in Higher Education is the opportunity to work with those entering the profession that you have been passionate about for many years. So I get really excited when I hear the stories from recent graduates, who start making a difference – almost straight away"

 

"What Bec demonstrated with this work is that any school library and teacher librarian CAN have a great physical and virtual learning environment – on a budget – with professional enthusiasm and love for the work."


Via Trudy Raymakers
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100 Helpful Blogs For School Librarians (And Teachers) | Edudemic

100 Helpful Blogs For School Librarians (And Teachers) | Edudemic | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"We love librarians. They’re the gatekeepers of knowledge and always looking to explore new ways to enhance the learning experience. I learned about the latest trends in libraries at this year’s CALICONin San Diego and love the move toward open source, cross-library sharing, and going digital.

But what if you weren’t able to attend CALICON or simply want to get a regular update on all the fun stuff happening with libraries? Lucky for you, our friends at Online College shared the following post with us.

It details 100 great blogs librarians around the world should add to their RSS reader."

 

Looking for great Twitter chats for librarians? Click here: http://edudemic.com/2012/06/twitter-chats-library/

Looking for information on how libraries are using Pinterest? Click here: http://edudemic.com/2012/03/20-ways-libraries-are-using-pinterest-right-now/

 


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
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FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books

FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Futurist Thomas Frey:

"Libraries are not about books. In fact, they were never about books.
Libraries exist to give us access to information. Until recently, books were one of the more efficient forms of transferring information from one person to another. Today there are 17 basic forms of information that are taking the place of books, and in the future there will be many more…"

 

"Here is a list of 17 primary categories of information that people turn to on a daily basis. While they are not direct replacements for physical books, they all have a way of eroding our reliance on them. There may be more that I’ve missed, but as you think through the following media channels, you’ll begin to understand how libraries of the future will need to function:
Games 
Digital Books 
Audio Books 
Magazines 
Music 
Photos 
Videos 
Television 
Movies
Radio 
Blogs 
Podcasts 
Apps 
Presentations 
Courseware 
Personal Networks 
Each of these forms of information has a place in future libraries. Whether or not physical books decline or even disappear has little relevance in the overall scheme of future library operations."


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Best library / librarian blog 2011 | The Edublog Awards

Best library / librarian blog 2011 | The Edublog Awards | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Nominations listed for the best librarian blog 2011

 

Best library / librarian blog 2011 http://t.co/nLtJH6xb via @AddThis just voted for @gwynethjones :)...

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