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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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Video: Libraries now A day in the life - Julie Dressner and Jesse Hicks

Video: Libraries now A day in the life - Julie Dressner and Jesse Hicks | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Video: Those of us with our heads firmly lodged in the swirling surreality of the Internet may be somewhat surprised to hear that public libraries—those shadowy old fortresses where information is still preserved on pieces of paper bound into quaint objects called books—remain vitally important to millions of New Yorkers. In an eye-opening video that shows a day in the life of various NYPL branches, filmmakers Julie Dressner and Jesse Hicks show just how necessary these public institutions are today.
Karen du Toit's insight:
Inspiring video about the increasing necessity of libraries
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How New York Pay Phones Became Guerrilla Libraries

How New York Pay Phones Became Guerrilla Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

John Metcalfe:

"Artist John Locke is converting obsolete Manhattan phone booths into mini libraries. Now if only people would stop stealing his entire book collection."

 

"The concept, sponsored by Locke's imaginary Department of Urban Betterment, is that New Yorkers will pick up unfamiliar titles while running their errands and then, perhaps, replace them the next day with favorite books of their own. That's in an ideal world. Of the two guerrilla libraries that the artist has fashioned, one has been used properly while the other has had its entire collection repeatedly ganked by sticky-fingered pedestrians. Its shelves were also stolen.

But Locke has many more libraries planned. With plywood consoles that slip over payphones as neatly as aprons, these sidewalk objets are endlessly replicable. (No doubt they'll feature in his 2012 Columbia course, "Hacking the Urban Experience.") I caught up with Locke over the weekend to ask him about what was and wasn't working with these literary outposts, as well as why he started the project in the first place. Here's what he had to say:

Based on your experiments, do you see the public-phone library as a viable concept?

The phone-booth conversions are part of an ongoing experiment that has not been perfected yet. But I think it can be. The response by people who see them and stop and wonder, What the hell is this thing doing here? has been totally positive, and that's enough motivation to keep trying."

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Trace the past with NY Public Library's Open Access Maps Project - by Bonnie Burton CNET

Trace the past with NY Public Library's Open Access Maps Project - by Bonnie Burton CNET | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"For over 15 years, the Lionel Pincus & Princess Firyal Map Division at the New York Public Library has been scanning maps from all over the world including those of the Mid-Atlantic United States from 16th to 19th centuries and even topographic maps of Austro-Hungarian empire ranging from 1877 and 1914.

Most notably, the NYPL has scanned more than 10,300 maps from property, zoning, and topographic atlases of New York City dating from 1852 to 1922.

There's also a "diverse collection of more than 1,000 maps of New York City, its boroughs and neighborhoods, dating from 1660 to 1922, which detail transportation, vice, real estate development, urban renewal, industrial development and pollution, political geography among many, many other things," NYPL posted in late March on its blog.

These and many more of the 20,000 cartographic works scanned are now available as high-resolution downloads for anyone who wants to visit their site."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great resource!

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