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The Information Professional
Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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A Curated Collection of The Best Search Engines for Your Information Need

A Curated Collection of The Best Search Engines for Your Information Need | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

From Robin Good's insight:

"A curated selection of the best search engines organized according to what you need to find..."


Read full Robin Good's insight below.


Check out it: http://www.noodletools.com/debbie/literacies/information/5locate/adviceengine.html

 


Via Robin Good, Giuseppe Mauriello
Karen du Toit's insight:

Good to keep handy!

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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, June 17, 4:59 AM

Good reference list. I didn't realize there were so many search engines.

Pushpa Kunasegaran's curator insight, June 19, 4:58 PM

This is an excellent resource!

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, August 14, 2:22 PM

For more resources on Social Media & Content Curation visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

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#followanarchive: Googledoodle for International Archives Day 2013?

#followanarchive: Googledoodle for International Archives Day 2013? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
WE REALLY WANT GOOGLE TO PICK UP ON THIS – SO PLEASE HELP US PROMOTE THE IDEA! 


In 2011 and 2012 we celebrated International Archives Day on June 9th by doing a worldwide #AskArchivists / #FollowAnArchive event on Twitter. We would like to do it again – if archives and archivists support the idea. But this year we would like the day to be extra special.

During the past years, Google has used variations on their logo to draw attention to people and causes worth noticing. Among the doodles are little works of art highlighting things as different as New Year, Chaplins Birthday, Opening of the Arcropolis Museum, Singapore Art Festival and National Library Week. But it seems, that there has never been an doodle on archives.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Please help to share to promote for a Googledoodle on 9 June 2013 

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From Wikipedia to our libraries

John Mark Ockerbloom:

I’ve heard the lament in more than one library discussion over the years.  “People aren’t coming to our library like they should,” librarians have told me.  “We’ve got a rich collection, and we’ve expended lots of resources on an online presence, but lots of our patrons just go to Google and Wikipedia without checking to see what we have.”  The pattern of quick online information-finding using search engines and Wikipedia is well-known enough that it has its own acronym: GWR, for Google -> Wikipedia -> References.  (David White gives a good description of that pattern in the linked article.)

[...]

Essentially we need three things: First, we need ways to embed links in Wikipedia to the libraries that readers use.  (We can’t reasonably add individual links from an article to each library out there, because there are too many of them– there has to be a way that each Wikipedia reader can get to their own favored libraries via the same links.)  Second, we need ways to derive appropriate library concepts and local searches from the subjects of Wikipedia articles, so the links go somewhere useful.  Finally, we need good summaries of the resources a reader’s library makes available on those concepts, so the links end up showing something useful.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Some great plans to direct patrons from Wikipedia and Google to the local library!

 

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12 Fabulous Academic Search Engines ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

12 Fabulous Academic Search Engines ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

In the world of academia, Google search engine does not always serve the purpose because most of the time its search results are not exact . I am a huge fan of Google but when it comes to academic search queries I  often have recourse to other search engines that are area or content specific. I have curated a list of some of these search engines that I personally use and I added to them other titles I found through Julie Greller . Enjoy


Via Dennis T OConnor
Karen du Toit's insight:

Great resource for academic search engines!

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Innovation in Libraries 2012 - Keynote Speech by Phil Simon

Phil Simon is a speaker and the author of four management books, including The Age of the Platform: How Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google have Redefined Bus...

Via Miguel Mimoso Correia
Karen du Toit's insight:

"Phil Simon is a speaker and the author of four management books, including The Age of the Platform: How Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google have Redefined Business. A recognized technology expert, he consults companies on how to optimize their use of technology."

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Get more out of Google: Tips for students doing online research [infographic]

Get more out of Google: Tips for students doing online research [infographic] | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Silvia:

"This is a great online research infographic that could be turned into a poster for the classroom."


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes… and no. | Impact of Social Sciences

Can librarians trust resources found on Google Scholar? Yes… and no. | Impact of Social Sciences | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Many librarians are still unwilling to fully embrace Google Scholar as a resource. Michelle C. Hamilton, Margaret M. Janz and Alexandra Hauser investigate whether Google Scholar has the accuracy, authority and currency to be trustworthy enough for scholars."


Via University of Nicosia Library
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Controlling your own digital footprint | web 2.0 and other library stuff

Larry the Librarian:

"Teaching ICT and digital citizenship to students has made me aware of my own Google trail and how to best collate and link my own cyber projects."

 

>Tools for a librarian!

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Big Changes at Google Scholar | Law Technology Today

Big Changes at Google Scholar | Law Technology Today | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Perennial LPM authors Carole Levitt and Mark Rosch are responsible for this week’s guest post about Google Scholar:

"Google is known for constantly working to upgrade and improve its services – and Google Scholar is no exception. Often these improvements are introduced with little or no announcement or documentation. Some of these “improvements” are for the better and some are not."


Via Errol A. Adams JD/MLS
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7 Great Google Spreadsheet Gadgets - PCWorld

7 Great Google Spreadsheet Gadgets - PCWorld | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

7 Great Google Spreadsheet Gadgets.  PCWorld.  One of the best-kept secrets of Google Docs, these gadgets add powerful features to your spreadsheets.

 

QR codes,

Custom Google Maps,

Organization Charts,

Interactive table,

Gantt Chart From Project Data,

Plot Data as colours on a map,

Animated Pie Chart


Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies , michel verstrepen
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Google Search Just Got 1,000 Times Smarter

Google Search Just Got 1,000 Times Smarter | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

CNN: Google announces big change to how search results are delivered, says new search tool will think more like a human.

 

Google has introduced the "Knowledge Graph" — or semantic analysis — to its most fundamental tool, search. Here's what that means:  http://mashable.com/2012/05/16/google-knowledge-graph/


Via Fe Angela M. Verzosa
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Google This, by Terry Ballard < One year of my life | Librarian on the edge - for your library #books

Google This, by Terry Ballard < One year of my life | Librarian on the edge - for your library #books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Terry Ballard:

"Last April I got a contract with Chandos Publishing of Oxfordshire to write a book called "Google this: Putting Google and other social media sites to work for your library." 

http://www.terryballard.org/googlethis.html ;

"As I had envisioned originally, I found dozens of librarians who had done great things with social media and got their stories. Whenever possible, I added cookbook-like instructions for crating things like IGoogle gadgets or captioning videos in YouTube. Being a longtime quote collector, I was able to find an apt quote for every chapter beginning. In the end, I see this as the capstone of a career that has gone on for nearly 50 years."

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Google Scholar Metrics: A New Resource for Authors and librarians

Google Scholar Metrics: A New Resource for Authors and librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Google Scholar quietly launched a new service, Google Scholar Metrics, earlier this month. Google Scholar Metrics allows users to browse a ranked list of publications in a variety of disciplines, sorted according to their h-indices."

 

"Google Scholar envisions that authors will use the service to “consider where to publish their latest article,” and also discover resources outside of their primary field of study. (As interdisciplinary research continues to grow, the latter functionality will likely become increasingly valuable.) Resources are also categorized by language, and journals may also be searched for using non-English terms (e.g. “salud”)—albeit on a limited basis.

Since the service launched, I’ve been thinking a lot about what Google Scholar Metrics can do for librarians. The first—and most obvious—possibility is that subject librarians can use it in a way similar to authors, in order to become familiar with new resources outside of their primary area of focus. They also might use it to supplement their calculation of the potential value of new journals (and not to mention that of traditional resources), before making purchasing decisions.

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Google Scholar Blog: Google Scholar Library

Google Scholar Blog: Google Scholar Library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"... Scholar Library, your personal collection of articles in Scholar. You can save articles right from the search page, organize them by topic, and use the power of Scholar's full-text search & ranking to quickly find just the one you want - at any time and from anywhere."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great new feature!

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Google lets users decide what happens to their email after they die

Google lets users decide what happens to their email after they die | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Google is the first major company to let people decide what happens to emails, photographs, blogs and social networks if their account becomes inactive.

 

[...]

"In a new feature called Inactive Account Manager, users can choose what happens to their emails, photographs, videos, blogs, social networks and other Google services if their account becomes inactive.

Users can decide to have their data deleted after a certain period of inactivity of between 3 months and one year. They can also choose to have some or all of their data sent to up to ten people they know.

The service applies to Gmail, Google + profiles, Picasa albums, YouTube, Blogger, Google Drive, Google Pages and Google Voice."

Karen du Toit's insight:

An option that should have been there from the start!

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Researchers use #NYT Archives to Predict the Future - NY Convergence

Researchers use #NYT Archives to Predict the Future - NY Convergence | The Information Professional | Scoop.it


Microsoft and the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have partnered and begun work on software that takes 22 years of news archives to try to predict the future.

 

Using New York Times archives, Wikipedia, and 90 other web resources, they hope to prevent future diseases, riots, and death. This is one of a number of future-predicting initiatives, including “Recorded Future,” a site that analyzes news, blogs, and social media. Researchers are also trying to use Twitter and Google to track flu outbreaks.

The researchers at Microsoft and Technion say that their software has the advantage over humans because of it’s ability to learn, research continuously, has no bias, and has a larger access to news.

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future prediction via archives! Interesting!

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Google - Useful to know

Google - Useful to know | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
1. Data Management
2. Your data on Google
3. Your data on the Web
4. Browse the Internet safely
Via Patty Ball
Karen du Toit's insight:

Tips and tools by Google to control and manage data safely on the Internet

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Lawyers & Librarians: Google's Battle for the Books, by @jeffjohnroberts

Lawyers & Librarians: Google's Battle for the Books, by @jeffjohnroberts | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"I'm happy to announce the publication of my e-book, The Battle for the Books: Inside Google's Gambit to Build the World's Biggest Library. This is a 50 page tale of gossip and rivalries between lawyers and librarians, and shows a cultural collision between Silicon Valley and the east coast over control of books and knowledge."

 

Available here: http://pro.gigaom.com/books/the-battle-for-the-books/

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Forget Google, Use Twitter Search Instead

Forget Google, Use Twitter Search Instead | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Posted by Shelly Kramer:

"Searching for information on a particular topic? Instead of using Google, give Twitter search a try. Here's what you need to know."

 

"The most common way to search Twitter is to use the twitter.com/search URL. And although this works, it’s a little too basic and doesn’t allow you to set any additional parameters aside from your search term.

Instead, our team recommends using the Advanced Search feature, pictured below. You can either access Advanced Search from the URL https://twitter.com/#!/search-advanced or pick the “Advanced” option that appears under the standard Twitter search bar."

 

Read more: http://www.v3im.com/2012/08/forget-google-use-twitter-search-instead/#ixzz27SrzXuk0

 


Via liblivadia, nickcarman
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How Google Impacts The Way Students Think

How Google Impacts The Way Students Think | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Terry Heick:

"It's always revealing to watch learners research."

 

"1. Google creates the illusion of accessibility

2. Google naturally suggests “answers” as stopping points

3. Being linear, Google obscures the interdependence of information"

 

"The natural limitations of Google have led to a cottage industry of digital platforms that have moved past simple mass curation. These traditional social bookmarking sites likeStumbleUpon, diigo, pearltrees, Scoopit, and others enable users to save information. Upstarts like pinterest make this process niche, allowing for plucking of visual artifacts, and allowing users to organize them into infinite categories.

But recent software has taken this even further, with apps like Learnist, mentormob, and even InstaGrokproviding more structure to how information is not only discovered, but sequenced and applied.

Which frankly blows Google out of the water–or at least restores Google back to its proper context.

A search engine, and nothing more."

 

>> Valuable to know as Information Professionals

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Inside the Quest to Put the World's Libraries Online - Atlantic Mobile

Inside the Quest to Put the World's Libraries Online - Atlantic Mobile | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Esther Yi:

"For all their differences, Google and the DPLA do share a major hurdle: Copyright law, which prevents the digitization of orphan works, numbering around 5 million and constituting about 50 to 70 percent of books published after 1923. Orphans are works whose rights holders are not known; they may be dead or unaware of their entitlement. Google's settlement would have given the company license to appropriate orphan works for posterity—a move that would have opened up a trove of previously unavailable works, at the expense of granting Google unprecedented control through litigation. The DPLA faces a similar problem: As some members pointed out in a gathering last year, out-of-print and orphan works—content in the "yellow zone" of copyright—outnumber both public domain and in-copyright works, "making legal reforms necessary for the success of a DPLA," according to meeting notes. Jason Schultz, an assistant professor at UC Berkeley School of Law and a DPLA member focusing on legal issues, says that the coalition wants to strike the right balance between the rights of copyright owners to be properly compensated and the rights of public access. The DPLA will not violate copyright, and it will begin with a foundation of public-domain works. The organization is trying to figure out the best case for fair use of out-of-print or unpublished works to argue that public access to this literature benefits society and serves a "higher" purpose.

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How Long Before You Will Scoop.it Instead of Google It?

How Long Before You Will Scoop.it Instead of Google It? | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Services like Scoop.it depend on a community of millions of hardworking experts