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A chef's plea to disrupt the antiquated food supply chain - GigaOM

A chef's plea to disrupt the antiquated food supply chain - GigaOM | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
A chef's plea to disrupt the antiquated food supply chain
GigaOM
Enter the world of food distribution, however, and you all but travel back in time to the last century.
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10 gross ingredients you didn't know were in your food - The Guardian

10 gross ingredients you didn't know were in your food - The Guardian | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
Anna Brones: If you're still reeling from the horsemeat scandal, hold on to your hats – there may well be arsenic in your beer and rat hair in your chocolate.
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Supermarkets cash in on unfounded fears about food and health ...

Supermarkets cash in on unfounded fears about food and health ... | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
Victoria Murphy: Products that are marketed as being free from GM, aspartame, MSG and parabens perpetuate myths and ignore evidence.
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10 Cooking Secrets From Great Restaurant Chefs - The Daily Meal

10 Cooking Secrets From Great Restaurant Chefs - The Daily Meal | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
The Daily Meal
10 Cooking Secrets From Great Restaurant Chefs
The Daily Meal
Professional restaurant chefs are in the trade of cooking, and so naturally, we always want to know some of their secrets.
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Arizona Corn Bread Recipe

Arizona Corn Bread Recipe | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
Unlike other corn breads, this one uses yeast. With oil and sour cream, this moist, tender loaf has a bit of zip to it from the peppers.
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Grilled Italian Chicken Roll-Ups - #Food #Recipe

Grilled Italian Chicken Roll-Ups - #Food #Recipe | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
"I had a pretty great weekend. Friday evening I scheduled a massage for myself. Saturday was spent at a fabulous food photography workshop (led by local photographer Gina Weathersby) during the day and a party with friends in the evening. And Sunday concluded with dinner prepared from start to finish by my husband… I was impressed with his results, and I’m not the easiest critic" http://buff.ly/181PTl5

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mmmm

 

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Jonathon Mascorella's comment, July 21, 2013 7:32 PM
This is an interesting dish - maybe we could deconstruct it and make it one day in class?
lorenzo pascuzzo's comment, July 21, 2013 7:35 PM
hi chris
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Food allergies, food labelling are key issues at food safety conference

Food allergies, food labelling are key issues at food safety conference | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
The foodservice industry is lagging behind when it comes to understanding allergies putting many restaurants and cafes at risk of losing customers, the annual HACCP food safety conference will be told.
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New York pastrami: America's best regional food? - USA TODAY

New York pastrami: America's best regional food? - USA TODAY | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
New York pastrami: America's best regional food?
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Sushi Chefs Accused Of Serving Whale Face Serious Jail Time

Sushi Chefs Accused Of Serving Whale Face Serious Jail Time | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
A California restaurant and two of its sushi chefs are in hot water over allegations that they sold endangered whale meat, which date back to 2007.

Via Elisabeth Paul-Takeuchi, Frank Kusters
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Themed events, functions are on the rise

Themed events, functions are on the rise | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
When it comes to functions, innovation and creativity are key as people seek to create memorable experiences for their guests.
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Eleven Inspiring Sustainable Chefs

Eleven Inspiring Sustainable Chefs | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
Chefs can be arbiters of change, choosing local ingredients and bringing fresh healthy food to the masses. Here are eleven great examples.

Via Cathryn Wellner, Alan Yoshioka
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Stir Fry —Raw Food Rawmazing Raw Food

Stir Fry —Raw Food Rawmazing Raw Food | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
The most important raw food recipes that I have in my collection are for quick and easy main dishes that really satisfy. Wanting something a little spicy and a

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Can food make you angry? | Life and style | theguardian.com

Can food make you angry? | Life and style | theguardian.com | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
Rebecca Hardy: For many of us, the food-mood link feels very real – but some say it's just in the mind. Still, surely it can't hurt to ditch the trans fat-laden junk food and sugar from our diets.
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How restaurants can maximize dining room space with booths | Back of the House content from Restaurant Hospitality

How restaurants can maximize dining room space with booths | Back of the House content from Restaurant Hospitality | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
The right dining room configuration strategy can boost your bottom line. (#LA_ Chefs - Is booth seating best for your restaurant?
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Chef's Choice: Peaked Pies - Pique Newsmagazine

Chef's Choice: Peaked Pies - Pique Newsmagazine | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
Pique Newsmagazine
Chef's Choice: Peaked Pies
Pique Newsmagazine
Around the world and in most cultures a food staple includes some form of pie. Pastry on the bottom, filling ...
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I Left My Heart at Don Alfonso

I Left My Heart at Don Alfonso | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
SANT' AGATA SUI DUE GOLFI, Italy – Italians are prone to exaggeration, but there may not be enough words to describe the gastronomic heaven on the Amalfi Coast that is Don Alfonso. (Blame the ravioli.
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Catfish - Chef's Resources

Catfish - Chef's Resources | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
Culinary profile for Catfish, Basa, Swai including flavor profile, fresh availability, nutrition, Channel Catfish taste & texture, recipes, butchering yield factor %, yield percentage, sustainability, description.
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Bakery boom as best in the business expand

Bakery boom as best in the business expand | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
Australia’s bakery scene is in evolution, with the rise of quality artisan bakery operations that are expanding their brands across the foodservice landscape.
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Great Pasta Thanks to Semolina, Chefs' Talk about Arizona Wheat

Great Pasta Thanks to Semolina, Chefs' Talk about Arizona Wheat | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
Semolina is a critical component of a pasta chef's repertoire so it's no surprise that chefs compare notes on sourcing the best wheat.

Via Haven Brand | Manure Tea
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who else loves pasta?

 

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California chefs encourage fresh dining in Cuba

California chefs encourage fresh dining in Cuba | The Industry of Hospitality | Scoop.it
HAVANA—Rice, beans, pork—and lots of it. Thats a typical restaurant meal in Cuba, widely regarded by travelers as a culinary wasteland where the variety and quality of raw ingredients leave much to be desired.

 

But a delegation of chefs from Alice Waters' celebrated Chez Panisse restaurant in Berkeley, California, is in Havana on a mission to spark a revolution in the Cuban diet by exposing islanders to healthier dishes with more fruits and vegetables, preferably grown organically and sustainably by local food cooperatives.

In the last week, members of the "Planting Seeds" delegation have held give-and-take seminars in Havana with chefs and culinary students about slow food. They also put on two massive dinners,

 

including a five-course, five-star meal at the privately run Le Chansonnier, which drew culinary, artistic and influential leaders like President Raul Castro's daughter, Mariela. A 100-person bash was held at a state-run restaurant for luminaries such as Berkeley Mayor Tom Bates, California state Sen. Loni Hancock and senior Cuban officials who are in position to affect agricultural policy.

The California chefs toured nearby organic farms and marveled at the fresh, pesticide-free produce, which they stuffed into car trunks as the base foodstuffs for the dinners. And by dreaming up new uses for workaday ingredients, they gave their Cuban counterparts a lot to think about.

Luis Ramon Batlle, for one, has seen plenty of guava during his long cooking career, but never thought to combine it with rabbit-liver pate atop a crispy wafer.

After tasting the savory-sweet appetizer at the Chansonnier dinner, he's considering adding it to the menu at his own privately run restaurant which opened last year in Havana.

"The cracker is practically neutral. The pate gives you all the classic flavor of liver, a little acidic. But at the end you sense the guava as a very subtle, very delicate touch," said Batlle, who is

In this Dec. 8, 2012 photo, U.S. chef Kelsie Kerr pays for produce at a farm in Havana, Cuba. Kerr traveled to Cuba with the "Planting Seeds" delegation that held give-and-take seminars with chefs and culinary students about slow food. Cuba has a longstanding culture of organic farming by necessity. During the "Special Period" of the 1990s, many private urban plots popped up in Havana amid austerity after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Unlike in the United States, pesticide-free is largely the rule here rather than the exception, mostly due to a lack of supply. ((AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa))

head chef at Divino in Havana. "I loved it."

"Planting Seeds" participants acknowledged that this trip was geared toward interactions with high-end chefs, whose clientele is mostly foreigners and more affluent Cubans.

But they said it's just a first step. They hope that Cuban chefs newly inspired to go fresh will inspire imitators, starting a trickle-down effect that over the long term will reach into private homes.

At Chez Panisse, the chefs only decide at the last minute what to serve, based on what's available and fresh. Their advice to Cuban cooks who struggle with unreliable supply of even basics such as eggs and potatoes: Be flexible, and don't worry too much about maintaining a fixed menu.

"Walk around the farm. Get a feel for all the vegetables and start using your imagination about how you can make those vegetables taste like what they are," said Jerome Waag, head chef at Chez Panisse, crackling a chard-like leafy green with his fingers for emphasis. "That's what we do in California. That's the way we like to cook. We keep things really simple."

Cuba has a longstanding culture of organic farming by necessity. During the "Special Period" of the 1990s, many private urban plots popped up in Havana amid austerity that followed the collapse of Cuba's backer, the Soviet Union. Unlike in the United States, pesticide-free is largely the rule here rather than the exception, mostly due to a lack of supply.

And a new generation of privately run restaurants known as "paladars" has breathed life into Cuba's culinary scene.

But there are obstacles to the Chez Panisse ethos of fresh-is-best.

At the same farmers' market that enamored the chefs on the outskirts of Havana, locals said wages have not kept up with a 20 percent rise in food prices last year.

Two buyers said the quality was great but they can only afford to shop there once or twice a month. Prices that astonish an outsider—$1 gets you a small bag of produce, enough for a couple of meals—are steep for Cubans who earn about $20 a month on average.

Even getting to a produce market can be tough because most Cubans don't own a car and public transportation is spotty. Supply is heavily dependent on the season.

"The only option in the summer is to work with what little there is, like eggplant. There are no carrots," said Laura Fernandez Cordoba, a partner at Le Chansonnier. "The options are very limited."

Raul Castro has moved to expand private and cooperative agriculture, lease out fallow state land and facilitate direct sales to state- and private-run eateries. The government has also promoted "green belts" around major cities to help reduce the distance food must travel in a country where delays and inefficiency sometimes cause food to rot before it reaches consumers.

Even so, meat is often frozen, thawed and refrozen while still in the supply chain.

Other, cultural factors would seem to make the Chez Panisse model a tough sell.

Restaurants here typically overcook vegetables until they are mushy, even for salads. Many Cubans who are able to cobble together hard currency opt for processed foods in supermarkets like canned vegetables, dried mashed potatoes or jarred spaghetti sauce. And a common household cost-cutting practice is to reuse cooking grease again and again, until each meal is infused with the same underlying taste and odor.

It all adds up to cement Cuba's reputation as a gourmet's nightmare.

"A lot of the food that I've seen (here) seems like it's very cooked ... we lose sort of the freshness of it," Waag said. "We lose sort of all the energy."

The Chez chefs threw a spontaneous end-of-trip party Monday and, in a departure from catering to Havana's elite, cooked for residents of a working-class block.

Working from a front-porch stand borrowed for the night, they handed out barbecued cumin-, turmeric- and lime-marinated chicken drumsticks and yogurt-batter onion rings for free to the neighbors.

It was a far cry from what's usually on offer at the stand: oil-soaked dough-fritter cholesterol bombs that can be snapped up for pennies apiece.

"We are trying to make the idea of nutrition a little more flexible," said Batlle, the chef at Divino, "so people understand it a little more."


Read more: California chefs encourage fresh dining in Cuba - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/ci_22169997/california-chefs-encourage-fresh-dining-cuba?IADID=Search-www.denverpost.com-www.denverpost.com#ixzz2GXIZp7SP
Read The Denver Post's Terms of Use of its content: http://www.denverpost.com/termsofuse


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Food can bridge cultural divides - Michigan State University Extension

Food can bridge cultural divides
Michigan State University Extension
Food can bridge the cultural divides we face in our interactions with others.
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