The Heart of Leadership
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The Traits That Lead To Success - And How To Tell Who's Got Them

The Traits That Lead To Success - And How To Tell Who's Got Them | The Heart of Leadership | Scoop.it

Technology changes quickly. Companies implode and people switch jobs every few years.

 

If 30% of information in some fields becomes obsolete in a year, how long does expertise last? says Liz Wiseman in her forthcoming book, Rookie Smarts: Why Learning Beats Knowing in the New Game of Work.

 

It’s not that expertise isn’t helpful, but success comes from constantly approaching work as a “perpetual rookie,” Wiseman writes, someone who is “living and working perpetually on a learning curve.” People who can do that will thrive. Here’s how to recognize someone who’s always in back-to-school mode:

 


Via The Learning Factor
Don Cloud's insight:

"Being a good leader often means approaching situations with a rookie mindset." 

 

Without this "rookie" mindset, a leader will gravitate towards him/her knowing the answer or relying too heavily on "experts" who supposedly know the answers.  And this will inevitably lead to groupthink and static thinking.

 

Instead, ask thoughtful questions and inspire the same of those around you -- this is the only path to critical thinking and innovation ... and to create the organizational culture that naturally thinks and operates in this way.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 15, 2014 6:52 PM

Being a good leader often means approaching situations with a rookie mindset. Here's how to tell if you are up to the challenge.

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Connect, Then Lead

Connect, Then Lead | The Heart of Leadership | Scoop.it

A few small nonverbal signals a nod, a smile, an open gesture can show people that you’re pleased to be in their company and attentive to their concerns. Prioritising warmth helps you connect immediately with those around you, demonstrating that you hear them, understand them, and can be trusted by them.


When Strength Comes First


Most of us work hard to demonstrate our competence. We want to see ourselves as strong and want others to see us the same way. We focus on warding off challenges to our strength and providing abundant evidence of competence. We feel compelled to demonstrate that we’re up to the job, by striving to present the most innovative ideas in meetings, being the first to tackle a challenge, and working the longest hours. We’re sure of our own intentions and thus don’t feel the need to prove that we’re trustworthy despite the fact that evidence of trustworthiness is the first thing we look for in others.


Via The Learning Factor
Don Cloud's insight:

Leaders must both be approachable and trustworthy while also be strong and competent.  It's a false choice that you have to be either likable or tough -- the strongest leaders are both likable AND tough!

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 31, 2013 7:01 PM

A growing body of research suggests that the way to influence and to lead is to begin with warmth. Warmth is the conduit of influence: It facilitates trust and the communication and absorption of ideas.

Rescooped by Don Cloud from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Culture Of Courage: Creating A Culture That Breeds Bravery

Culture Of Courage: Creating A Culture That Breeds Bravery | The Heart of Leadership | Scoop.it


People are innately wired to avoid risk. During times of times of change and uncertainty, our risk aversion is amplified. Yet the number one way to gaining competitive edge is by creating a culture where people feel safe and emboldened to innovate and challenge the status quo thinking. The first key to creating a 'culture of courage' is leading from possibility, not probability.


Winston Churchill once said that courage is the first of all virtues because it is the only one that guarantees all others. Courage is also what it takes to set a bold course for yourself and your organization, engage in a courageous conversation, forge new ground, and to be decisive in uncertainty.



Via The Learning Factor
Don Cloud's insight:

Courage is the guardian of integrity, the foundation of culture, and the fuel to energize innovation and change. 

 

But it is not enough for a leader to have courage -- rather, it is the leader's responsibility to recruit, breed, and develop courage across the organization.  Here are 5 "must do" tasks that every leader needs to embrace, encourage from their people, and embed into the "DNA" of their institution.

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Marianne Naughton's curator insight, September 3, 2014 2:54 PM

Building Courage In Our Culture ...

Teresa Lucke's curator insight, September 4, 2014 6:14 PM

Courage and passion trump fear, go ahead,  step out of your comfort zone!

Bénédicte Berche's curator insight, September 14, 2014 12:26 PM

L'audace est une habitude à prendre... Voilà 5 clés pour un leadership audacieux !