The Harlem Renaissance
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The Harlem Renaissance
A movement but also arts, and music.
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Harlem Renaissance iMovie!

iMovie.
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This is my iMovie and I tried really hard on it. I hope you enjoy and I hope after you're done watching it you've learned a little from it. Well thanks. -Makiya(:

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Harlem Renaissance Vocabulary!

Vocab!
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1.)Refurbished- renovate and redecorate.

Sentence- The premises have been completely refurbished.

2.)Encompasses- surround and have or hold within.

Sentence- Vast halo encompassing the Milky Way galaxy.

3.)Novelists- A writer of novels.

Sentence- Books are created by novelists.

4.)Intellectual- appealing to or requiring use of the intellect.

Sentence- The movie wasn't very intellectual.

5.)Renaissance- revival of art and literature under the influence of classics.

Sentence- Rail travel is enjoying a renaissance.

6.)Momentum- impetus and driving force of a process or course of events.

Sentence- Investigation gathered momentum in the spring.

7.) Revolutionize- change (something) radically or fundamentally.

Sentence- This fabulous new theory will revolutionize the whole of science.

8.) Commonalty- people without special rank or position; common people.

Sentence- A petition by the earls, barons, and commonalty of the realm.

9.) Innovate- make changes in something established by introducing new methods, ideas, or products.

Sentence- Innovating new products, developing exisiting ones.

10.) Consensus- general agreement.

Sentence- A consensus of opinion among judges.

 

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#2 Primary Document: Cotton Club

#2 Primary Document: Cotton Club | The Harlem Renaissance | Scoop.it
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During the Harlem Renaissance The Cotton Club was one of the most famous nightclubs in history. The original Cotton Club opened in the 1920′s on 142nd street and Lenox Avenue when central Harlem was the playground of the rich. If you were a Black woman and wanted to perform there, you had to be “light, bright, and damn near white!” The hey day was enjoyed well into the 20′s and 30′s until race riots of 1936. By then more changes came along and the club couldn't keep its momentum. The Cotton Club of the Harlem Renaissance closed for good in 1940. But today, there is a new incarnation of the Cotton Club which sits on the most western end of 125th street under the massive Manhattanville viaduct.

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#2 Website On Issues Of Today...

#2 Website On Issues Of Today... | The Harlem Renaissance | Scoop.it
A blossoming (c. 1918–37) of African American culture, particularly in the creative arts, and the most influential movement in African American literary history. Embracing literary, musical, theatrical,...
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The Harlem Renaissance article is related to my topic because it tells lots of information on the Harlem Renaissance. For example, it explains a brief summary about that Renaissance, the background, black heritage and American culture, the question of "Negro art", and etc.

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#3 Website During The Time Period...

#3 Website During The Time Period... | The Harlem Renaissance | Scoop.it
Learn about the Harlem Renaissance through games, illustrations, and stories!
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Harlem Renaissance Essay!

essay.
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            During the early portion of the 20th century, Harlem was the destination for migrants from around the country, attracting both people seeking work from the South, and an educated class who made the area a center of culture, as well as a growing "Negro" middle class. After the American civil war, liberated African-Americans searched for a safe place to explore their new identities as free men and women. They found it in Harlem. Harlem became an African-American neighborhood in the early 1900s. In 1910, a large block along 135th Street and Fifth Avenue was bought by various African-American realtors and a church group. The renaissance was mainly about African Americans gathering in Harlem, New York creating good music, novels, drama, poetry, and leading intellectuals. Despite the increasing popularity of Negro culture, virulent white racism, often by more recent ethnic immigrants, continued to affect African-American communities, even in the North. Race riots and other civil uprisings occurred throughout the US during the Red Summer of 1919, reflecting economic competition over jobs and housing in many cities, as well as tensions over social territories. The first stage of the Harlem Renaissance started in the late 1910s. Industrialization was attracting people to cities from rural areas and gave rise to a new mass culture. During this time period, the musical style of blacks was becoming more and more attractive to whites. With this instrumental modification to the existing genre, the wealthy blacks now had more access to jazz music.

 

                                          Raising awareness with the whites gaining attention from them which effected in the 1960s Civil Rights Movement. The Harlem Renaissance was given little notice by mainstream America, but it did help renew New York City. The Renaissance had a profound impact not only on African-American culture but also on the cultures of the African diaspora as a whole. The writers that followed in the 1930s and 1940s found that publishers and the public were more open to African American literature than they had been at the beginning of the century. Also the musical style of blacks was becoming more and more attractive to whites. White novelists, dramatists and composers started to exploit the musical tendencies and themes of African-American in their works. New York's Harlem became the center of African American cultural life in the United States. For the first time, blacks and whites began associating and collaborating in public. This era also built strong black urban areas. During the Harlem Renaissance, African Americans began having an influence in national politics and the power to change decisions in Congress. It brought African Americans together in traditions of a black culture.

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#3 Primary Document: Harlem Renaissance's Map

#3 Primary Document: Harlem Renaissance's Map | The Harlem Renaissance | Scoop.it
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This Harlem Renaissance map is my last primary document because it explains some of the popular places African Americans use to go for fun. Clubs, homes, churches, ballrooms, and theatres were the main places African Americans use to go. These places were walking distance for most but others had cars to go everywhere. As you can see Langston Hughes one of the famous novelists during the time lives very close to the Apollo Theatre. But he'll have to ride in a car to go anywhere else like to the Cotton Club. I think these were the olny places that African Americans use to attend in Harlem during the Renaissance. And these our the main places they talk about.

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#1 Primary Document: Apollo Theatre

#1 Primary Document: Apollo Theatre | The Harlem Renaissance | Scoop.it
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Constructed on 125th Street in Harlem, New York was the Apollo Theatre. originally it was Hurtig and Seamon's New Burlesque Theatre, and African American admissions were not permitted. First the theatre featured burlesque but the city's mayor didnt like it. January 1934 African Americans began to perform and the attention shifted to to the new celebration of Black culture in New York City. In 1934, it introduced its regular Amateur Night shows hosted by Ralph Cooper. The Apollo became famous for launching the careers of asrtist such as Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, James Brown, Diana Ross & The Supremes, Gladys Knight & the Pips, The Jackson 5, Patti LaBelle, Marvin Gaye, Luther Vandross, Stevie Wonder, Aretha Franklin, Ben E. King, Mariah Carey, The Isley Brothers, Lauryn Hill, and Sarah Vaughan. The Apollo was  a “place where stars are born and legends are made.”

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#1 Website On Issues Of Today...

#1 Website On Issues Of Today... | The Harlem Renaissance | Scoop.it
A Columbia graduate student’s discovery of an unknown 1941 novel by Claude McKay has been authenticated.
Makiya Mitchell's insight:

Claude McKay was an Jamaican-born writer and political activist who died in 1948 at age 58. This relates to the Harlem Renaissance because the second half of the book was written of the Harlem Renaissance and it shows examples and explains them that the renaissance continued to be vibrant and creative and turned its focus to international issues. Claude McKay also wrote the best-selling novel till this day "Home to Harlem." McKay also influenced black writers. For example Langston Hughes. 

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