The Good, the Bad, the Branding
31 views | +0 today
Follow
The Good, the Bad, the Branding
Branding in public relations
Curated by amber jackson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

4 steps to gauge a brand extension with social media

4 steps to gauge a brand extension with social media | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
Not sure whether your brand will benefit from launching a spin-off product such as a sleep aid or a soda-infused barbecue sauce? Test the waters first.
amber jackson's insight:

            In this article by Jehan Hamedi, published on Ragan's Pr daily website, Hamedi discusses the steps needed in order to judge brand extension with social media platforms.  Hamedi says that social media is a great way to test consumer interest in a brands new product.  Social media is also a free tool, versus paying for market research studies.  He list four steps that can used to evaluate your product with the aid of social media.

            The first step is to establish a baseline.  If a brand wants to find out what people are saying about their products they can perform text analysis on social media platforms that have conversations about their product.  A brand can determine the tone of the conversations and how people feel about your product.  The second step is to examine other cases.  A brand can compare their information from their analysis with other products they carry to see how well they fit together.  This information can give a brand a good idea of how their new product will be received by consumers.  The third step is to evaluate the brand extension.  This step takes place several months down when a brand analyses the discussions that have been taking place online about the new product.  Has the conversations been positive or negative, do people recommend the product?  Does the new product incase brand loyalty and brand awareness or does it hurt the brands imagine?  This information is vital for a brand to know whether or not to continue with their new product.  The final step is to conduct a full post launch audit.  At this point brand managers must ask the vital question, how has our brand extension affected our overall brands image.  The answer to this question is the important information when deciding whether or not to continue with a new product launch.  Brands want to grow a positive image and if a new product hurts that growth, it must be dropped.

             I related this article back to our discussion on electronic commutation and social media.  This article focuses on how brands can use social media as a cost effective way to judge the success of a new product and the effective that product will have on a brands image.  The article on social media stats can help a brand decide which social media outlets to use if they want to gather information on a new product.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

Herding cats? Tough. Branding with them? Let’s talk viral impact

Herding cats? Tough. Branding with them? Let’s talk viral impact | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
Learn why feline images remain so popular and how you can use them in your online marketing efforts. A new infographic explores the allure of calicos, Persians, Russian Blues—and yes, bacon, too.
amber jackson's insight:

            In this article by Rachel Farrell, published by Ragan's PR Daily website, focuses on the internet sensation of cats and how brands can use this trend to help build their brand.  Farrell explains that there three ways for brands to cash in on the webs love of cats.

            The first example is that online campaigns that utilize cats can add some humorous, visual elements.  Added cats and humor is almost a sure fire to get your meme, GIF or ad to go viral.  People just cannot seem to stay away from cute or sarcastic cat posts. The second advantage given by Farrell is that cats can help to introduce your brand to younger generations, like millennial's, for example.  Farrell pointed out a popular website called cheezburger.com, that was created around a picture of a British Shorthair cat, this site pulls more over 3.6 million users each.  Making it a great place to upload your own cat meme.  Finally Farrel says, cats get  people's attention.  If a brand can create an authentic image, GIF, meme, etc. it can almost guarantee that millions of people will see it.  Cat viral posts are cheap, easy to make and incredibly successful.         

            Farrell ended her article with a large graphic that shows how popular cats are on the internet, it almost shows that bacon is also popular, just some food for thought.  According to the graphic cat posts receive 30,400,000 monthly Google searches, then the graphic breaks that down into sub categories like cat videos, cat GIF's, funny cat, etc.  The graphic shows that cats videos are downloaded a whopping 11,300,000 times each month on YouTube, imagine what a brand could do with a cheap, funny cat video on YouTube. The graphic wraps up with how a brand can use cats online to increase brand popularity, which are basically the three points Farrell had in the article, cats can humorous elements to a campaign, cats help brands introduce themselves to younger generations and the bottom line is, cats get views.  Videos with cats can increase their sales by almost 8% and increase brand awareness by 10%, with 7 millions views on YouTube.  Plus cats go viral more than any other animal online.

            I related this article back our discussion on electronic communications.  Like the article about burning books, which was a group of people advertising the burning of books, in order to get people's attention to save the library.  Brands can use cats to create campaigns that aren't really about what their selling, but do so creatively enough that it gets people's attention and they end up doing what the brand really wants.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by amber jackson from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

8 Brands Rocking Snapchat

8 Brands Rocking Snapchat | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
Mobile apps such as Twitter, Vine, Instagram and Snapchat are turning traditional media marketing upside down, challenging brands in increasingly new ways.

Via TechinBiz
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

Expectations of a brand's social media manager

Expectations of a brand's social media manager | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
A huge part of the equation is simply showing up and being timely with information.
amber jackson's insight:

                This article from PRDaily.com, dives into what is expected from brands when using social media or operating online and the important role the Social Media Manager plays for a brands image.  Christopher Kerney, the author of this article titled "Expectations of a brands social media manager," begins by listing his expectations from a brand when it comes to social media sites, like Twitter, and the benefits of using social media effectively for that brand. 

                Kerney begins his article by saying, if he or someone else Tweets a brand or makes a comment on a post, he expects a timely response of some kind.  He continues, by stating that everything is done online, no one really calls a company's hotline to speak to an actually person anymore.  The majority of consumers communications are done online through email or social media.  So, it is extremely important for a brand to employee an effective Social Media Manager. 

                Kerney believes that the role of the Social Media Manager is vital in building and maintaining a brands public image. We now live in a 24 hour online world, and Social Media Managers must constantly monitor a brands social media sites for post about that brand, both negative and positive.  Kerney warns not to delete negative comments or post, you would risk unleash the wrath of the online world.  Instead, Kerney suggest that the Social Media Manager respond in a way that paints the brand in a positive light. 

                It is important to always turn a negative post into something positive, that is how a Social Media Manager can build a brand's image. Effectively using social media to build a positive brand image comes with several benefits, according to Kerney. When someone has a positive interaction with a brand online, they are more likely to purchase their product or use their service.  Another benefit to keep in mind, is that consumers use online platforms to talk about companies and brands, positive interaction create positive internet feedback and negative interaction create twice as much negative feedback, and unfortunately negativity spreads much faster than positive feedback.  Kerney believes that the Social Media Manager plays a huge role in building a brands image, they can build a brand up or bring it down.

                When thinking of this article in terms of topics discussed in class, I could not help but think that, Amy's Bakery could have used a good Social Media Manager, when dealing with their crisis.  Amy's Bakery is the example of how not use social media.  They use negativity to combat negativity and the internet united against Amy's Bakery, effectively destroying their brand. Had they had a Social Media Manager who understood the importance of using social media to turn negatives into positives, they could have turned a bad situation, into a positive opportunity. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

Personal branding: 5 components to help you land a job

Personal branding: 5 components to help you land a job | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
Use the same branding techniques as major companies standout in today’s crowded job market.
amber jackson's insight:

            In this article from Regan's PRdaily.com, the author Ann Ittloop, describes the importance on building your own self brand, if you hope to successful in the public relations or communications fields.  She says that branding is the best way to market ourselves and we should think of ourselves as a product that we are trying to sell, whether it is for a job or trying to gain a new client.  Ittloop says that in order to begin the personal branding process, there are a few key steps to take.  Number one, you must be able to define yourself, as in what are the skills that set you apart from everyone else, what are your values, your unique experiences, basically anything that makes you stand out or different. Number two, you must figure out your audience, Ittloop says you must figure out who you want to reach with your branding.  Finally, the third thing you must do is create your own message, what is that you want to communicate to others?  What do you want your audience to remember about you?  Ittloop says that these three items are key to establishing your own personal brand.

            Once you have these elements in place, it is time to build your personal brand.  Ittloop lists important tools for this process, starting with your logo.  Every brand, even a personal brand, needs a logo to stand out and make you memorable.  You also need a catchy tagline to help make yourself stand out amongst other public relations professionals, when creating your tagline, think what do you want your audience to remember about you?  The next item needed is branding tools, for example business cards, websites or personal stationary these are key tools that can be used to brand yourself as an unique individual.  Other key tool in personal branding are social media platforms, like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to name just a few. The use of social media can make or break your personal brand and should be used thoughtfully.  The tool Ittloop says you need to create your personal brand are greeting cards, Ittloop says that greeting cards are a dying breed in the light of our high tech world. Which is why greeting cards can help you stand and help establish your personal brand.  Ittloop ends her article saying that personal branding can give you the edge needed in the competitive world of public relations. 

            I tied this article back to class, through the "Theories Chat Sheet." I used Cialdini's six key principles of influence and persuasion.  I believe the principles of liking and scarcity relate to this article the best.  Creating a personal brand you audience will like, will the best effective.  Plus, if you are successful at creating a personal brand, that really makes you stand out from everyone else, then you have successfully created a brand that is scarce.  After all, there is only one of you!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

Brands’ commemorations of 9/11 meet varied reactions

While some social media remembrances were deemed understated and respectful, others were viewed as crass attempts to cash in on a solemn anniversary.
amber jackson's insight:

     This article focused on how the general public reacted to different brands social media posts about 9/11 on the anniversary, or in the case of the Marriott for example, a social media post was created for them.  9/11 can be seen as a trigging event to some brands. 

 

        A triggering event is an activity that motivates stakeholders

        to act on their latent readiness. It can be something that occurs

        naturally, such as a thunderstorm or the change of seasons.

        Election day is the triggering event for a politician running

        for office. The largest commercial triggering event year is

        the holiday season. Noon is a triggering event for most

        consumer - lunchtime. (Center, Jackson, Smith & Stansberry, 2008).

 

In other words, in terms that apply to brands and PR, a trigging event provides Public Relations professionals an opportunity to shine a little attention on their clients.  Unfortunately for some brands, 9/11 is a tricky trigging event.  With a tragic and sensitive event like 9/11, brands have to decide the best way to handle the situation.  Should they make comments about the heartbreaking events that took place that day, should they go with the "never forget" motto, should they say nothing, so that appear to be using the situation to attract attention?  This is a difficult position for any brand to be in.  If they say nothing they risk the people thinking they do not care enough to say or do anything to remember the event, but if they say the wrong thing, or their message is taking the wrong, the backlash could be ruthless. 

         So, how did brands handle 9/11 this year?  With mixed results according to this article found on PR Daily.  As mentioned before, Marriott found its brand all over social media today, after a customer posted a picture of the Marriott they were at idea of how to remember those who lost their lives.  After all nothing says, "we care" like offering free mini-muffins and coffee for a 30 minutes.  This article also says that AT&T brand image took a hit today, because of its Twitter post of a Smartphone displaying a picture of the two beams of light in New York City skyline.  On the other hand, other brands posts about 9/11 went over well with the public.  American Express Twitted and picture of New York City's skyline, through a cut out of a heart, which received positive feedback.  Why were the reactions so different? Is it that AT&T brand is already seen less favorably than American Express? The article points that brands seem to inspire different reactions to 9/11 post, even though most posts are fairly similar.  It makes sense, if people already like and enjoy your brand, they will tend to believe that, that brand is more sincere. Versus, if a brand's reputation is already not so great, people will believe the worst.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

The evergreen problems brands will always face

The evergreen problems brands will always face | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
Whether it’s touting the freshness of canned fruit or the fast food industry warding off health advocates, there are some perceptions that certain companies must continuously
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

6 types of pictures brands share on Facebook

6 types of pictures brands share on Facebook | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
Your Facebook followers want images. They’re starving for them—so give them want they want and watch the ‘likes,’ shares, and comments roll in.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

'Personal branding': Tattoos in the workplace

'Personal branding': Tattoos in the workplace | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
Many millennials have tattoos, but some executives and hiring managers might find them unseemly for communications professionals, regardless of age or the changing times.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

Execs’ 10 most and least respected brands

Execs’ 10 most and least respected brands | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
A new poll shows what business executives (not consumers) think of the best-known corporate entities in the U.S. Soft drink makers fizz; airlines and cigarette companies fizzle.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

8 Brands Rocking Snapchat

8 Brands Rocking Snapchat | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
These are the chattiest brands on Snapchat, demonstrating that time-sensitive images can actually be a strength in brand marketing.
amber jackson's insight:

            In this article by Sarah Ang and published on Mashable.com, Ang discuss which brands are effectively using the social media app call Snapchat.  Ang says that moblie apps like Twitter, Vine, Snapchat, etc. are changing the way brands market.  She continues by saying that Snapchat is popular among younger demographics, and a lot of brands are not use to marketing are to those demographics.  However, Snapchat is much more cost effective than traditional forms advertising and Snapchat campaigns are very successful. 

            Snapchat launched Snapchat Stories this past October, which allows brand to create advertisements that last longer than the usually 10 second rule Snapchat has and they can keep their images up for a full 24 hours at a time.  The article give examples of brands that effectively using Snapchat to increase brand awareness and brand loyalty.  

            A frozen yogurt chain in New York city asked people to send Snaps of them eating at one of its location and they would Snap them back a coupon.  Taco Bell uses Snapchat to let customers know when new products are coming to the fast food chain.  Acura, released sneak peeks of its new car to the first 100 people who joined them on Snapchat.  Karmaloop sends exclusive deals to its Snapchat followers.  GrubHub, which is a food delivery service, gives special deals through its Snapchat account  The New Orleans Saints use Snapchat to give fans behind the scenes stories of the team.  The designer Rebecca Minkoff used Snapchat to preview her collection during New York Fashion week right before it hit the runway.  MTV UK used Snapchat as a promotional tool for its up coming season of Geordie Shore, which is thier verison of Jersey Shore.

            These brands have all effectively used Snapchat to build brand awareness, increase sales and build brand loyalty.

            I related this article back to our discussion on electronic commutation and social media.  I think this article proves how successful a brand or a campaign can be with the use of social media.  Better yet, Snapchat is relatively new to the social media game and only a few brands have figured out how to use it for their advantage.  Meaning that the brands who are already using Snapchat successfully are corning the market and are taking this time to build their brand, before everyone else catches on and Snapchat is over run by advertisements and marketing campaigns. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

Linking Facebook to Twitter? Bad idea for brands

Linking Facebook to Twitter? Bad idea for brands | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
This seemingly brilliant shortcut might be damaging your online reputation and costing you customers. Here's why.
amber jackson's insight:

            In this article by Brett Heitz and published on Ragan's PR Daily website, focused on the importance of using Twitter as its own separate platform for brands, versus linking with Facebook.  Heitz starts be stating that business owners are extremely busy and look for ways to save time.  So, for them the idea of linking their Facebook posts to their Twitter account, is a great way to same time and keep their social media pages updated with posts.  Heitz warns against this temping time saving technique.  Heitz believes that it is vital that brands keep Facebook and Twitter separate.  He believes that Twitter is so important to brand development, that Twitter must be treated as its own entity.

            Heitz gives four reasons why a brand should keep their Twitter separate from the Facebook accounts. 

The first reason he give is that linking your accounts is anti-social.  If your brand only updates Facebook and just has that post show up on their Twitter account, it is unlikely that anyone is actually logging into Twitter on a regular bases.  Which means, no one is responding to people who comment on your Twitter posts.  Heitz says that not responding to your followers on Twitter defeats the purpose of using Twitter and can hurt your brand image.The second reason given by Heitz is that by not creating original content for Twitter is unauthentic.  He says that people using social media are looking for unique content and re-reading what you already posted on Facebook, hurts a brand image.The third reason Heitz provides is that it comes off sloppy to have you Facebook post appear on your Twitter account.  He says that the formats are different for each site.  Facebook posts can be much longer and Twitter only allows 140 characters, meaning a brands post can be cut short in awkward places on Twitter.The finally reason Heitz gives is that by linking Facebook and Twitter it can hurt a brands social media process.  He states that brands who use Facebook to create Twitter contents, tend to have far fewer followers.

I related this to consumer relations.  In order for you brand to be successful, it needs to continue to build relationships with its consumers.  If your social pages turn people off, then you risk hurting your relationships with your consumers. Social media is king right now and no brand can afford to create poor consumer relations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

10 ways to improve your personal brand

10 ways to improve your personal brand | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
From your elevator speech to your online image and connections, there are many facets that can impress—or repel—a potential employer.
amber jackson's insight:

In this article written by Dan Davenport, published on Ragan's PRDaily.com, explains the importance of building your personal brand and to do so effectively.  Davenport says that a brand is basically an expected standard of performance.  The better the brand, the higher this expectation will be. This fact is also true for your own personal brand. Davenport identifies ten elements to help build your personal brand and help you stand out and showcase that you can perform at a higher level of professionalism.

                The first item on Davenport's list is, the written professional bio.  Which is a document that describes your "professional value proposition." This is important because it lets potential employers know what you can do for them and why they hire you.

                Item number two; the elevator speech.  In a nut shell, the elevator speech is your spoken bio and needs to be delivered in 30 seconds.  Basically, imagine if you were to meet your potential employ on an elevator, can you sum up what you have to offer in the 30 second ride.

                Item number three; self-description.  Summing up your bio in three to four words.  Davenport says, that great brands have the ability to sum up what they have to offer in just a few simple words and you should be able to do so as well.

                Item number four; business cards.  Davenport says you also need business cards, whether you are employed or not.

                Item number five; your appearance. Davenport says it is surprising how people go for a job interview or networking event, looking less than professionals.

                Item number six; your behavior. The way you act, says a lot about your personal brand and the level of professionalism you bring to the table.

                Item number seven; your domain name. Davenport says to create website, using as  much of your name as possible, to help build your brand identity.

                Item number eight; social media.  You want to check your social media sites and make sure there is not anything you do not want a potential employer to see.

                Item number nine; your personal photo. Davenport says, that you want your cover photos to be the same across all of your social media and online sites.  Helps people connect you to your personal brand.

                Item number ten; your own voice. Davenport suggest starting a blog, so people or employers can learn what can of voice you have. A blog can help stand out and build your personal brand image.

                I linked this article back to Cialdini's six key principles of influence and persuasion.  You want to build your brand to persuade others to hire you. The principles of liking and scarcity relate to building your personal brand the best. You want to create a brand that people like and if you successfully create a unique personal brand you have achieved scarcity, after all, there is only of you and only you can provide the standards expected from your brand.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

5 questions brands should ask themselves before posting about the news

5 questions brands should ask themselves before posting about the news | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
When a disaster happens or as the anniversary of a catastrophe approaches, it may seem like commenting is the right thing to do. Sometimes, silence is best.
amber jackson's insight:

            I found this article on Regan's PRdaily.com, written by Scott Smith and Jeana Anderson, in their article they discuss what brands should consider before commenting stories in the News.  The articles starts out explaining that with the anniversary of Hurricane Sandy approaching, many brands want to use this trigger event to comment and get their name in the conversation.  Smith and Anderson concern these brands not to act to quickly and to think things through.  They say brands can come across as trying to force a message or even be offensive, they use the example from the brands you tried to comment on 9/11 this past year and failed miserably.  They warn that brands should be careful when dealing in real time marketing, brands should balance the benefits of taking part in the national conversation and with the potential damage you could bring upon your brand.  Smith and Anderson say, that if you feel that your brand most join the conversation, they should consider five important questions before jumping in.

            The first question is, does the news event you want to comment on affect your costumers or brand?  If the event affects your costumers, then it might be appropriate to comment on the event.  There are three factors you can use to determine if your brand is affected by the event.  The first is people focused, is the event taken place in the city your company is based out of or do you have a large group of customers in the city?  What is the content, is this event the type of thing your brand always comments on anyway.  The final factor is, is it necessary?  Does this event need to be commented on by your brand?

            The second question that needs to be asked is, are you wanting to comment on this event as a form of bran promotion?  If the answer is yes, then it is better to not to say anything.  You do not want your brand seen as using a horrible event to promote r sell something.

            The third question is, can anyone say, what we want to say?  Generic statements, like "our thoughts and prayers are with families..." is something everyone says and according to Smith and Anderson, these statement can be useful from one person to another, but a large brand saying this comes across wrong.

            The fourth question is, has your content for the day been reviewed?  Brands should always check the content they commenting on against current events, otherwise an innocent statement, said in the wrong time, can come out wrong.

            The final question that needs to be ask is, is what you are wanting, really better than remaining quite.  If it would be better for your brand remain silent on an issue, then it is best to follow that instinct.

            I relate this article back to the idea of using a trigging event to get your brand in involved in the national conversation.  Brands use trigging events to promote their brand and message.  Which sometimes is a really effective tool, but at other times can damage a brands imagine. 

more...
Sarah VanSlette's comment, October 28, 2013 1:53 PM
Great post, Amber, and I love the title of your page!
Sarah VanSlette's curator insight, October 28, 2013 1:55 PM

If you are uncertain about the appropriateness of your post, it's best to not post at all.

 

Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

6 types of pictures brands share on Facebook

6 types of pictures brands share on Facebook | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
Your Facebook followers want images. They’re starving for them—so give them want they want and watch the ‘likes,’ shares, and comments roll in.
amber jackson's insight:

This article focused on how some brands take advantage of the opportunity social media provides, by using images to catch the general public's attention.  Using social media and creative images are get public relations tactics used to call, hopefully positive attention to your brand.  What makes  using social media and a visual images as branding tactics even better, is how extremely budget friendly it is to use these tools.  After all, Facebook and Twitter are free to join, and a brand can create a create image or even a video, with nothing more than a Smartphone.  All a brand needs is a create mind, internet access and a little bit of free time and the opportunities are endless.  In fact, with how important social media and online images have become, it is more surprising that more brands are not taking advantage of these tools, as pointed out in the article.

PR Daily provided some creative examples of brands taking advantage of the current social media image sharing phenomenon.  One example is how Oreo, a member of the Nabisco family, comes up with clever ways to celebrate the odd events and corky dates the online community have become found of. In this example, Oreo created an image for "Star Trek Day." Obviously, Star Trek is not a "holiday" in the terms we traditional think off.  Banks do not get to close down to honor Spock, and we cannot justify skipping school or work to celebrate everything that Captain Kirk as brought into our lives.  But did that stop Oreo from finding a way to tie its brand image to a day that unites Treckkies everywhere? Nope, Oreo saw the opportunity and went for it.  Oreo used the iconic of their original chocolate and cream sandwich cookie and turned into a mini, delicious Enterprise, while posing the question "Who are more die- hard fans- Star Trek or Oreo lovers?" This one post of Facebook generated over 26,000 "likes," and over 12,000 comments, plus over 5,000 people shared the post.  There you have it, Oreo had a simple idea, place a cookie on two pieces of cheap blue plastic, snap a quick picture and add catchy fun question for the title and they had social media branding gold.  Other brands noted in this article for using images on social media to bring awareness to their brands were Burt's Bees, Tiffany & CO, Starbucks and Dove. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

What Twitter’s profile changes mean for brands

What Twitter’s profile changes mean for brands | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
You’ll need to develop a new header image, but the way you approach Twitter shouldn’t change radically.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

A Creative Agency That Applies Political Tactics to Brands

A Creative Agency That Applies Political Tactics to Brands | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
Specs Who Front, l.-r.: partners Rebecca Matovic, Kate Rothen; chief creative officer and partner Bobby Hershfield.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

5 Reasons Brands Should Go Live

5 Reasons Brands Should Go Live | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
What do The New York Times, the Huffington Post and Verizon Wireless all have in common? All three brands have moved from real-time communications to “live” broadcasting—through video.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by amber jackson
Scoop.it!

10 ways to improve your personal brand

10 ways to improve your personal brand | The Good, the Bad, the Branding | Scoop.it
From your elevator speech to your online image and connections, there are many facets that can impress—or repel—a potential employer.
more...
No comment yet.