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The Glory of the Garden
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The Impact of Tar Sand Mining on Bird Migration

The Impact of Tar Sand Mining on Bird Migration | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it

Fifty years ago, Rachel Carson warned us about a silent spring, a time when we would no longer hear the birds sing. After her book Silent Spring was published, many of the toxins used at the time were banned and birds became protected under international law. Unfortunately, we often put economic gains before our commitment to the environment, and the tar sands of Canada are another example of putting profits before ecology. Studies predict that over the next 50 years, bird populations could decrease anywhere between 6 million and 166 million unless effective action is taken — action that is both in our hands and our best interests.

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Down hoses for wildlife, conservationists urge

Down hoses for wildlife, conservationists urge | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it

"One of the worst droughts in living memory is gripping southern and eastern areas and RSPB experts are predicting breeding failures for some our most threatened wetland birds as well as the increased threat of fire facing wildlife-rich heathlands.

Today sees the introduction of a hosepipe ban by seven water companies and people are being urged to consider the impact their water use will have on nature."

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Positive Changes to Biodiversity - Wellington NZ

Positive Changes to Biodiversity - Wellington NZ | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it

"We have lost 95 percent of our lowland forest, most of our wetlands and dunes, and three quarters of our bird species are threatened. But working with volunteers and other councils and agencies, we are gaining ground in the battle to reverse the loss of Wellington's biodiversity."
The most obvious success story is our growing native bird populations. Tui are flourishing - bellbird, whitehead, kakariki, tomtit and kaka numbers are increasing and we're now seeing kereru nesting in our reserves.
"Behind these changes are planting and pest management programmes that are creating healthier forest with fewer pests where birds can prosper," says Cr Ritchie.

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