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Do protected areas for wildlife really work? - The Ecologist

Do protected areas for wildlife really work? - The Ecologist | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it
Can national parks and protected areas safeguard wildlife against the growing pressures of population growth and climate change?

 

"As a Canadian study revealed last year, biodiversity is falling across the board despite an increase in the number of areas given ‘protected’ status. There need to be more of them and they need to be bigger, argue the researchers, but there also need to be fewer people.

With the global population destined to reach 9 billion by 2050, the pressure on species and habitat is expected to grow in tandem with the difficulties of protecting them. The study identifies a ‘clear and urgent need for the development of additional solutions for biodiversity loss, particularly ones that stabilise the size of the world’s human population and our ecological demands on biodiversity."

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Positive Changes to Biodiversity - Wellington NZ

Positive Changes to Biodiversity - Wellington NZ | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it

"We have lost 95 percent of our lowland forest, most of our wetlands and dunes, and three quarters of our bird species are threatened. But working with volunteers and other councils and agencies, we are gaining ground in the battle to reverse the loss of Wellington's biodiversity."
The most obvious success story is our growing native bird populations. Tui are flourishing - bellbird, whitehead, kakariki, tomtit and kaka numbers are increasing and we're now seeing kereru nesting in our reserves.
"Behind these changes are planting and pest management programmes that are creating healthier forest with fewer pests where birds can prosper," says Cr Ritchie.

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BBC NEWS | Food and food production needs 'fundamental rethink'

BBC NEWS | Food and food production needs 'fundamental rethink' | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it

"Professor Lang said that in order to feed a projected nine billion people by 2050, policymakers and scientists face a fundamental challenge: how can food systems work with the planet and biodiversity, rather than raiding and pillaging it?"


Via Alice Ruxton Abler
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David Hulme's comment, April 6, 2012 5:44 PM
thanks again!
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Why bees & biodiversity benefit from indigenous wildflowers - Green Living - The Ecologist

Why bees & biodiversity benefit from indigenous wildflowers - Green Living - The Ecologist | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it
Filling your garden with wildflowers helps honeybees and butterflies, and creates a relaxed mood.

Via Bioversity Library
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Unsustainable consumption – the mother of all environmental issues? — European Environment Agency (EEA)

Unsustainable consumption – the mother of all environmental issues? — European Environment Agency (EEA) | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it
Consumption of products and services impacts the environment in many different ways.
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delaneygrimes-sarahmcfadyen's curator insight, February 7, 2014 2:00 AM

In this article they include the many things that are continuously brought to the populations attention about out earth and how we treat it. But in the passage it includes many unbelievable facts such as roughly 89 million gallons of food is put into waste each year. Sometimes this is the approach you need to catch peoples attention on the effects that we are causing our planet.

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The Link Between Conservation and Global Poverty

The Link Between Conservation and Global Poverty | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it

"On a global scale, deforestation, carbon emissions, and loss of biodiversity are fueled by the consumptive appetites and economic demands of developed nations. However, in certain localities in developing countries, it’s the poorer inhabitants – those who directly share space with critical ecosystems – who have a significant impact on habitat destruction and biodiversity loss.
Many of the world’s richest, and most threatened biodiversity hotspots are located in least developed nations – areas where local human populations live largely below the poverty line. In these scenarios we see a continuous conflict between the immediate material needs of the poor, and the long term need to preserve biodiversity and habitats for the health of the planet."

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Call for biodiversity effort issued - UPI.com

Call for biodiversity effort issued - UPI.com | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it
Call for biodiversity effort issuedUPI.comPHOENIX, April 2 (UPI) -- US researches say mapping and charting the Earth's biosphere and an estimated 10 million more species can and must be done to sustain its biodiversity.
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Lofty ambitions: why green roofs are the future of urban gardening - Green Living - The Ecologist

Lofty ambitions: why green roofs are the future of urban gardening - Green Living - The Ecologist | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it
Run out of space in your garden?Look to higher ground and you’ll find an eco-friendly solution...
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Improving Garden Biodiversity Top Ten Tips | Gardeners Tips

Improving Garden Biodiversity Top Ten Tips | Gardeners Tips | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it

Every garden has the potential to do more for biodiversity. It need not cost and it may be fun to improve the biodiversity in your garden. Just undertaking one item from the following top ten tips will help.

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Conserving biodiversity hotspots 'could bring world's poor $500bn a year'

Conserving biodiversity hotspots 'could bring world's poor $500bn a year' | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it
Study puts economic value on the indirect ecosystem services provided by the world's poorest people...
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