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Food Waste Visualized [Infographic 1 of 2] - Forbes

Food Waste Visualized [Infographic 1 of 2] - Forbes | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it

"If you have a few spare days to root through reports by the FAO, the EPA, and many other organizations, you will find there is a lot of information out there about the problem. But two infographics have compiled much of the data for you.

The visual below, created by Door to Door Organics, explains why food waste is an issue and gives some tips as to what you, the consumer, can do about it. The second graphic – found here – gives more detail as to what kinds of foods are wasted, where, and why."

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FAO: Success in hunger fight hinges on better use of water

FAO: Success in hunger fight hinges on better use of water | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it

Via David Hulme
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African agriculture: Dirt poor

African agriculture: Dirt poor | The Glory of the Garden | Scoop.it

The key to tackling hunger in Africa is enriching its soil. The big debate is about how to do it. ... African governments, international donors and scientists all agree that farmers must revitalize their soils. But there is passionate debate about how to do it. Many African governments and agricultural scientists argue that large doses of inorganic fertilizers are the most practical solution. But others, such the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome, are pushing for greener, cheaper solutions, such as no-till farming that conserves soil and 'fertilizer plants' that boost the soil's nitrogen content organically. Researchers report that these latter techniques are beginning to raise yields and improve soil fertility. But farmers are slow to adopt such practices, which require significantly more labour.


Via CIMMYT, Int.
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