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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


Via Seth Dixon
Marcelle Searles's insight:

useful for both Year 8 and Year 11 Geography.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Lorraine's Changing nations
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Maeklong Railway Market

"Multi-purpose land use."


Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer
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Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:05 PM

In America you will hear safety first and health second. But for most veggie market sellers, health and safety do not matter. Every tiny bit of space, especially in Asian countries, are not wasted and organized. These people are used to dealing with this problem on a daily basis and they learn in the face of danger. Most of the time people live near train stations, which serves as a good location to sell products. One thing that I noticed is that no one is concerned when the trains approach the veggie market. Those veggie could get contaminated when the train goes through for example leaving metal bits from the brake system, hydraulic fluid.... etc. However, in the U.S. people argue about how the vegetables are treated with pesticides. This can lead to potential life hazards. Poor local communities need to adapt to survive in whatever space they can manage and take advantage of the available resources even when the environment makes it a challenge. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:34 PM

That's insane!!!  At the same time is great that the people figured out what works and what doesn't.  Right down to what can actually stay on the tracks, under the tracks, and the retractable awnings.  Genius!

Eden Eaves's curator insight, Today, 7:33 PM

Unit 5

The Maeklong Railway Market is located in Thailand on an actual railway that is used by a train 8 times a day. The vendors get a three minute notice before the train comes by and yes, this is enough time for them to fold up awnings and umbrellas, move their things, and notify shoppers to watch out. It is a huge tourist attraction in Thailand because who wouldn't want to see a farmers market fold up into the walls as a train passes and then pop right back out as of nothing happened?   

This really is an amazing use of space and the people who started this Railway market are true visionaries and deserve a round of applause for paying attention to what the community needed and finding the means to make it happen. 

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Geoweb.tv
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Interactive Urbanisation Map

A fantastic interactive map with population charts that show the massive explosion in urbanization since 1950 until the present.


Via Grant Davies
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Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from geography
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ViewPure - Toowoomba Flood 2011.01.10


Via Sarah McGill
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Sarah McGill's curator insight, August 10, 2014 8:40 AM

Great video to generate inquiry questions on floods - perfect for Year 5 Geography....

This link is to the video with no ads...

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Geography Education
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Feeding 9 Billion

Feeding 9 Billion | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.

Via Seth Dixon
Marcelle Searles's insight:

Useful for Year 9 and 12 Geography 'Feeding the World' unit.

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dilaycock's curator insight, April 29, 2014 6:00 PM

Excellent resource from National Geographic that offers a 5-step plan to deal with the issue of feeding the world's population.

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 30, 2014 11:09 PM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.   

 

This article relates well to the Population topic in Global Challenges and issues that arise from the present growth patterns.  

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:59 PM

As population continues to grow and agricultural lands dissappear, the issue of feeding the world is becoming a growing concern.

The environmental places of the world are becoming arid and the agrarian places are dwindling affecting the human/environment interaction by introducing agricultural issues.

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Geography Education
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Why Geography?

Why Geography? | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

"Geography. It lets you study the world. No, really, THE WORLD. Think about that. What other subject deals with rocks? Moving continents? AND climate? Diffusion of plants and animals? Water quality? Now, what if you add some human systems--do the other sciences let you relate the earth to economic or political systems? And culture--food, religion, music, housing, or language? How about urban systems and settlement forms? Past, present, and future, anywhere in the world? And how many subject areas let you look at something from a scientific, social-scientific, humanistic, AND artistic perspective? Yeah, I said artistic--I like to illustrate my findings with a nice map.

Tell me all about global studies or environmental science if you'd like--they're alright too. But NOTHING lets you see the world like geography does."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2014 11:17 AM

This 'sermon' from the Church of Geography is outstanding (the 'Church' is a geo-evangelizing group on Facebook and Twitter that is the home to the delightful memes pictured above).  Many organizations are trying to re-brand geography to gain greater public support at the same time that other interdisciplinary initiatives with geographic content are gaining traction: global studies, environmental sustainability, centers for spatial analysis, etc.  We don't need a name change as much as we need people to capture the vision of geography's centrality and holistic capacity. 


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education.

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 3, 2014 5:20 PM

This scoop caught my eye because of all the cartoons and memes. Some of them are pretty funny geography puns, and I'm sure other people will enjoy this.

There is world and human geography, and I have already learned world geography. World Geography has already helped me learn a lot about the world around me. Before, I was very illiterate in maps, but now I'm pretty decent. I can't wait to learn more in human geography! 

1) geography as a field of inquiry

It's a FB page of geography and it basically spreads the topic of geography, which is increasing in awareness. I think everybody should learn world geo and human geo is a good elective to take. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 11:06 AM

beginning year :)

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Sustainable Urban Future
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Future of Connected and Sustainable Cities

A short film looking at the challenges and opportunities facing cities. (Sustainable Cities http://bit.ly/gFfzFH)


Via Walid Malouf
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Choucri Bechir's comment, March 18, 2011 6:49 PM
very interesting video !
Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Holyrood magazine
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Future plans: young people and planning - Young people are often overlooked in the planning process but they can offer valuable insight into the built environment

Future plans: young people and planning - Young people are often overlooked in the planning process but they can offer valuable insight into the built environment | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
“Town planning is not merely place-planning, nor even work-planning.

Via Holyrood Magazine
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Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Y10 Environmental change and management
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Erosion: The White Cliffs of Dover

Erosion: The White Cliffs of Dover | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Thousands of tons of chalk from the famous White Cliffs of Dover have collapsed into the sea following a huge rockfall.

 

An excellent example of erosion and the processes that have shaped an iconic landscape.  The accompanying article has numerous pictures from a variety of angles that truly tell the story.   


Via Seth Dixon, Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF, Byron Northmore
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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 10:41 AM

The White Cliffs of Dover serve as an natural icon for England. The cliffs are composed of chalk, giving them their white milky appearance. During the Cretaceous period, calcium carbonate from small coccolithophores and other phytoplanktons deposited on the bottom of the ocean and over time turned into chalk. While these cliffs have stood the test of time, it is important to remember that landscapes are always changing, especially now with drastic climate change. With increased amounts of erosion, weather anomalies, and acid rain, it will be interesting to see how some of these iconic landscapes are affected.

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Y10 Environmental change and management
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Climate change: how hot will it get in my lifetime? - interactive

Climate change: how hot will it get in my lifetime? - interactive | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

The UN is to publish the most exhaustive examination of climate change science to date, predicting dangerous temperature rises. How hot will it get in your lifetime?


Via Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF, Byron Northmore
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Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Y10 Environmental change and management
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What Is Global Warming

This video explains the concept of global warming, which is generally thought to be caused by human driven emissions of greenhouse gasses, such as carbon dioxide.

Via Wieneke Maris, Byron Northmore
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Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Y10 Environmental change and management
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Map: These are the cities that climate change will hit first

Map: These are the cities that climate change will hit first | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

A city hits "climate departure" when the average temperature of its coolest year from then on is projected to be warmer than the average temperature of its hottest year between 1960 and 2005. For example, let's say the climate departure point for D.C. is 2047 (which it is). After 2047, even D.C.'s coldest year will still be hotter than any year from before 2005. Put another way, every single year after 2047 will be hotter than D.C.'s hottest year on record from 1860 to 2005. It's the moment when the old "normal" is really gone.

A big study, just published in the scientific journal Nature, projected that the Earth, overall, passes climate departure in 2047. The study also projects the year of climate departure in dozens of specific cities. Here, from The Post's graphics team, is a map of their findings:


Via Mathijs Booden, Byron Northmore
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Mathijs Booden's curator insight, October 13, 2013 3:25 AM

The data are from the recent Nature article by Mora et al (http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v502/n7470/full/nature12540.html). 

 

Climate departure would come first in the tropics, because that is where climates typically show little variability, so even a small departure is large in relative terms. However, because tropical ecosystems are adapted to that low variability, they will be hit hard by even a small change in climate. 

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Y10 Environmental change and management
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Coastal Systems: Coastal Management Issues 2

In the field with Simon Haslett, Professor of Physical Geography at the University of Wales, Newport, and author of Coastal Systems (2008, Routledge). Please...

Via Lorraine Chaffer, Byron Northmore
Marcelle Searles's insight:

Year 10 Coastal Management Unit

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Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Digital Presentations in Education
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5 Infographics to Teach You How to Easily Make Infographics in PowerPoint

5 Infographics to Teach You How to Easily Make Infographics in PowerPoint | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Learn how to easily create professional-looking infographics in PowerPoint with these 10 free templates.

Via Baiba Svenca
Marcelle Searles's insight:

a good visual tool

 

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Dianne Mitchell's curator insight, May 16, 1:52 PM

I found this topic really useful, not only for the free templates but also the helpful advice about including infographics effectively in research reports.  I have only recently (as some of you know) learned how to create graphs, pie charts and so on so being able to create relevant infographics is one of my next learning tasks.  I hope that you find them useful, not only for your University research projects but also for presenting information in your work contexts too.

Christelle Quillet's curator insight, May 18, 9:40 AM

Outil utile pour créer des posters rendant compte de résultats d'enquête, par ex.

No Boxes's curator insight, May 18, 5:25 PM

I love infographics!  Thanks to HubSpot for sharing these.

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Geography Education
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Kiribati and Climate Change

You might not be feeling the effects of climate change, but Kiribati, a small country in the Pacific, is actually drowning because of rising sea levels. Check out how the government there is trying to run a country that might not exist in a few years.

Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 26, 5:14 PM

Climate Change is an issue that affects some parts of the world greater than others.  The island nation of Kiribati is greatly impacted by the effects of the warming climate due to the fact that it is barely above sea level.  In fact, as we learned in class, the country is facing a "when not if" situation regarding having to leave their nation.  The government says it is to relocate with dignity rather than be unskilled refugees when they arrive in countries.  The president of the country, even though it is to late to stop the ocean from flooding his country, is still highly invested in preventing more land being lost from the effects of a rising sea level associated with global warming.  However, until nations such as India and China, as well as the United States try whole hardheartedly to prevent it and cut down on their emissions the trend will continue.  I can't imagine how hard it is to run a country that is in essence preparing for its own demise.  In fact, until taking this class, I was unaware of many of the small countries that existed in the Pacific Ocean. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:13 PM

This is a scary thought to lose your home and country.  I'm not sure the rest of the world will care unfortunately because this country does not produce something needed globally.  Is it possible to create a Waterworld of sorts (Kevin Kostner movie) or Esgaroth (The Hobbit- Lake town).  I know these are movie fantasy, but maybe they could create something like this.  Or find a backer to drop lots of sand on the island periphery to build it back up like Abu Dhabi's The World.  This would bring tourism I believe.  This would bring money, which would then sustain the Kiribati.  They need to get a highly visible celebrity involved.  

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 9:27 PM

This phenomenon is unfortunate.  Kiribati's existence is being threatened by global warming and the effect it has on rising sea levels.  Kiribati could be fully covered by water within a few decades.  The positive about this situation, however, is that its' government is being proactive and training the citizens in a multitude of different trades, so that they could be marketable elsewhere if they are forced to flee their homeland. 

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from geography
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Interactive Wind Map

Interactive Wind Map | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Mesmerizing.

Via Seth Dixon, Lorraine Chaffer, Trish Harris, Sarah McGill
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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, March 13, 2014 4:30 PM

Stunning interactive wind map.

Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, March 13, 2014 5:23 PM

Excellent for visual learners.

MSU_TCEE's curator insight, March 20, 2014 4:43 PM

The Ides of March definitely BLEW into our area!  Perfect timing to find @Seth Dixon's Scoop of this interactive Wind Map!

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from geography
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Flooding 6 Solutions To Flooding

Solutions to flooding Key idea: There is discussion about the costs and benefits of hard and soft engineering and debate about which is the better option

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Sarah McGill's curator insight, August 10, 2014 8:44 AM

Great ideas for flood management solutions...perfect for discussion with Year 5 students...great photos to show the different solutions..

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Geography Education
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How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture

Via Seth Dixon
Marcelle Searles's insight:

Useful for Year 9 and 12 Unit: Feeding the World.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 2014 11:41 PM

Potatoes were brought to the New World through the Columbian Exchange. It does have a negative connotation but the trade route was used to diffuse cultures by trading food. 

Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 5:35 PM

Columbian Exchange Unit

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 12:57 PM

Potatoes are one of the most widespread foods in the world, due to its resiliency to harsh weather conditions and its ability to grow to large sizes. Potatoes can also be traced to show the beginning forces of globalization. Before modern communication and transportation technology, globalization occurred at a much slower rate. Globalization spread through trade routes in the forms of foods, resources, and therefore cultures and people. 

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Sustain Our Earth
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An Inside Look At Living In One Of The World’s Most Sustainable Cities

An Inside Look At Living In One Of The World’s Most Sustainable Cities | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Melbourne, Australia is trying to be one of the world's most livable and sustainable cities. Melbournians are pitching in by pushing the envelope on design and lifestyle decisions when it comes to living spaces.

Via SustainOurEarth
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Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Doc D's Instructional Design, Technology & Reform News
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This iPad App Builds Better, More Sustainable Cities

This iPad App Builds Better, More Sustainable Cities | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

This iPad App Builds Better, More Sustainable Cities...


Via Dr. Debi Ash
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How town planning can help to eradicate poverty

How town planning can help to eradicate poverty | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Planners need to understand and prove the impact their work will have on poverty reduction, says Kate Henderson (RT @GuardianHousing: How town planning can help to eradicate poverty http://t.co/1Y1SRNdla7...
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Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Y10 Environmental change and management
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Sea-level rise driving Hawaii's beach erosion

Sea-level rise driving Hawaii's beach erosion | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
Up to 100 feet of shoreline will disappear around the state if sea level rises just 1 foot.

Via Russell Roberts, Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF, Byron Northmore
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Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:59 PM

Unit 1 - Coastal erosion

KTC Hawaiian - Kapo Trading Company's curator insight, September 2, 2013 1:46 PM

Maybe you property will be beach front soon...

Kyle Kampe's curator insight, September 4, 2013 9:27 PM

Erosion in Hawaii

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Y10 Environmental change and management
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What are the impacts of climate change? - Australian Museum

What are the impacts of climate change? - Australian Museum | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it
The effects climate change could have on oceans, vulnerable animal species, sea level and human lifestyles.

Via Wieneke Maris, Byron Northmore
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Wieneke Maris's curator insight, February 20, 2013 9:57 PM

Good information about Changing Ecosystems leading to extinctions

Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Y10 Environmental change and management
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Global map provides new insights into land use

Global map provides new insights into land use | The Geography Classroom | Scoop.it

In order to assess the global impacts of land use on the environment and help provide appropriate countermeasures, a group of researchers under the leadership of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) has created a new world map of land use systems. Based on various indicators of land-use intensity, climate, environmental and socio-economic conditions, they identified twelve global patterns called land system archetypes.


Via Mathijs Booden, Byron Northmore
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Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Y10 Environmental change and management
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An Urbanizing Planet

An Urbanizing Planet takes viewers on a stunning satellite-viewed tour around our planet. By combining more than 10 datasets, and using GIS processing software and 3D graphic applications, the video shows not only where urbanization will be most extensive, but also how the majority of the expansion will occur in areas adjacent to biodiversity hotspots.

The video was produced to present the framework of a new book Global Urbanization, Biodiversity, and Ecosystems: Challenges and Opportunities — A Global Assessment. The scientific foundation of the Cities and Biodiversity Outlook project, the book presents the world’s first assessment of how global urbanization and urban growth impact biodiversity and ecosystems. It builds on contributions by more than 200 scientists worldwide.


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Rescooped by Marcelle Searles from Y10 Environmental change and management
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Coastal Systems: Coastal Management Issues 1

In the field with Simon Haslett, Professor of Physical Geography at the University of Wales, Newport, and author of Coastal Systems (2008, Routledge). Please...

Via Lorraine Chaffer, Byron Northmore
Marcelle Searles's insight:

Year 10 Coastal Management unit

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