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Mystery Alignment of Dying Stars Puzzles Scientists

Mystery Alignment of Dying Stars Puzzles Scientists | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it

Dying stars that are among the most beautiful objects in the universe line up across the night sky, and astronomers aren't sure why. These "cosmic butterflies" — actually a certain type of planetary nebula — all have their own formation histories, and they don't interact with each other. But something is apparently making them dance in step, scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope (NTT) have discovered.

 

"This really is a surprising find and, if it holds true, a very important one,"study lead author Bryan Rees, of the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, said in a statement. "Many of these ghostly butterflies appear to have their long axes aligned along the plane of our galaxy. By using images from both Hubble and the NTT we could get a really good view of these objects, so we could study them in great detail."

 

In the final stages of their lives, stars like our own sun puff their outer layers into space, creating strange and striking objects known as planetary nebulas. (No planets are necessarily involved. The term was coined by famed astronomer Sir William Herschel to describe celestial bodies that appeared to have circular, planet-like shapes when viewed through early telescopes.)

Rees and co-author Albert Zijlstra, also of the University of Manchester, studied 130 planetary nebulae in the central bulge of the Milky Way galaxy.

They found most of these objects to be scattered more or less randomly across the sky, but one type — the bipolar nebulae, which have distinctive butterfly or hourglass shapes that are thought to result when jets blast material away from a dying star perpendicular to its orbit — showed a surprising alignment.

 

"The alignment we're seeing for these bipolar nebulae indicates something bizarre about star systems within the central bulge,"Rees said. "For them to line up in the way we see, the star systems that formed these nebulae would have to be rotating perpendicular to the interstellar clouds from which they formed, which is very strange."

 

Faraway bipolar nebulae display this predilection much more than nearby cosmic butterflies do, the researchers said. They suspect that the orderly behavior may have been caused by strong magnetic fields present when the galaxy's central bulge was forming.

 

But little is known about the characteristics of the Milky Way's magnetic fields in the distant past, so the planetary nebula alignment remains mysterious for now. "We can learn a lot from studying

 these objects,"Zijlstra said in a statemnt. "If they really behave in this unexpected way, it has consequences for not just the past of individual stars, but for the past of our whole galaxy."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Chéri Vausé's insight:

My character Avi, in the Garden of Souls, is shown the origins of the universe. God has created a beautiful universe, filled with wonders. This is just a glimpse into it.

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DuckDuckGo

DuckDuckGo | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it

Five Stars - M. G. Armitage

What a ride this was!

I haven't been a faithful reader in years, probably because I find it very hard to be captivated in the first few pages. If I have to sludge through the first chapter, you lost me. I hated it when people would tell me, "oh just get through the first chapter or so, it gets good." If an author can't grab you into a story up front, I'm not putting my faith into the rest of it. That first taste of a book is what draws you in, what makes you keep coming back for more. A good book is like a gourmet meal...good from the first bite till the last.

This book, this fantastic book, was exactly what I was looking for! I was drawn in by the first page, and I wanted more. It's an incredibly fast read, and a book you frequently have a hard time putting down. I know I was guilty of sneaking peaks of it while at work. I jokingly called this book my time suck. You sit down at 6pm thinking you will read for an hour, and before you know it, it's 1am and you still want more.

This author has a way of writing characters you want to know in person. They are so real on the page you can almost reach out and touch them. The dialogue is fun and snappy, and the lead character is one you actually like and can root for. A lot of books these days have leads with highly questionable character values, like if you met them in person you'd probably hate them, and yet they are the ones you are supposed to be rooting for? But not Grant! This is a lead character you love to love. If you can fall in love with a fictional character, I fell in love with Grant.

The authors side characters are anything but throw away, and actually helped move the story along. And I must mention that I felt like the biggest character in this book was the Pacific Northwest. Having grown up in that area, the attention to details, roads, towns, weather, was impeccable. I felt like I was back there, and made me miss it all the more.

I am incredibly excited for upcoming books from this author. If they are anywhere near as good as this story was, this author has a reader for life.

Chéri Vausé's insight:

Found this wonderful review of my book by a M. G. Armitage. Amazon took it down, along with several other five star reviews I received. Shame on you Amazon! Shame! It's hard enough for us fledgling authors to make a living, but to have you steal food right out of our mouths is the worst! Shame on you! Fortunately, I saved it, so here it is. Thank you M. G. Armitage. You're the best! I hope you like my next mystery/thriller as much. Blessings out to you, Dear One!

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DuckDuckGo

The search engine that doesn't track you. A superior search experience with smarter answers, less clutter and real privacy.
Chéri Vausé's insight:

Editing or Writing Numbness is real. Those of us who spend a great deal of time creating worlds in our heads and putting them down on paper, suffer with this malady. It's hard to break away from our stories and get back into reality.

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17 Writers On The Importance Of Reading

17 Writers On The Importance Of Reading | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it
"Never trust anyone who has not brought a book with them." —Lemony Snicket

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Chéri Vausé's insight:

Reading is essential to writers, and not just for doing research. You can become hackneyed, in a rut, write in directionless formulas if you don't keep up and read someone else's style of prose. Authors, therefore, should read more than readers. Yes, that is exactly what I said. You will never grow as a writer if you don't read. As for reading junk, keep it to a minimum, for that could also keep you from reaching higher with your prose, from challenging you to writer better and better.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 7, 6:07 PM

7 November 2014

 

Oh what a delicious collection of quotes delivered to the mind's table with exquisite presentation.

 

These quotes are large enough to download and share with students. 

 

OR... to have students peruse in search of the single quote that most appeals to them.

 

A tip... tell the kids they can only pick ONE to call their favorite. Why? because it's easy to toss those without appeal. But extremely difficult to toss those with tremendous appeal. 

 

Just tell them the rules are they can ONLY pick one. Why? Because when forced to choose between two quotes (or maybe even three) they are forced into a sort of contemplative mode where they really have to weigh the reasons why both (or each) has such a strong appeal. 

 

And, in doing so, they will leave with an enhanced appreciation for all of the best ones. Rather than merely crossing out all but one and then not really exploring the source of any of the quote's attraction for them.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

"We appreciate your tax-deductible donations!"

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5 Movies That Use Mysticism As The Deus Ex Machina - WhatCulture!

5 Movies That Use Mysticism As The Deus Ex Machina - WhatCulture! | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it
WhatCulture!
5 Movies That Use Mysticism As The Deus Ex Machina
WhatCulture!
Chéri Vausé's insight:

Tolkien believed that mysticism used in a fictional format had more power to reach people than any other method. It is why I chose to write a novel, The Garden of Souls, over publishing a large nonfiction book. Fiction is more memorable.

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The Virgin Mary's Birthday - Catholicism - About.com

The Virgin Mary's Birthday - Catholicism - About.com | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it
When was the Virgin Mary born? Find the date, and learn about the traditions surrounding the Virgin Mary's birthday.
Chéri Vausé's insight:

Some traditional facts regarding Mary.

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A Monumental Underwater Structure in the Sea of Galilee – Biblical ...

A Monumental Underwater Structure in the Sea of Galilee – Biblical ... | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it
What is a monumental ancient stone structure doing in the Sea of Galilee? In a recent issue of The International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, Israeli archaeologists, geophysicists and oceanographers discuss an ...
Chéri Vausé's insight:

This is why my first novel had to be about biblical archaeology. There are so many artifacts and structures that are still unexplored.

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Practical Uses for Photogrammetry on Archaeological Excavations ...

Practical Uses for Photogrammetry on Archaeological Excavations ... | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it
An illustrated guide by the Jezreel Valley Regional Project's Adam Prins and Matthew J. Adams.
Chéri Vausé's insight:

Using technology in excavations has advanced considerably over the years, but nothing beats the shovel, the trowel, and the brush to get the details. In my novel, The Garden of Souls, everything comes down to hands on with the old romantic brush and shovel in the field, but the lab tests are about as advanced as any hospital.

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Biblical town discovered: Jesus could have ridden in this boat

Biblical town discovered: Jesus could have ridden in this boat | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it
Archaeologists may have discovered the Biblical town of Dalmanutha mentioned in the Gospel of Mark. According to a Sept.
Chéri Vausé's insight:

Beautiful example of the many artifacts that add to the richness of our Christian heritage.

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Grimm brothers’ fairytales have blood and horror restored in new translation

Grimm brothers’ fairytales have blood and horror restored in new translation | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it
Rapunzel is impregnated by her prince, the evil queen in Snow White is the princess’s biological mother, plotting to murder her own child, and a hungry mother in another story is so “unhinged and desperate” that she tells her daughters: “I’ve got to kill you so I can have something to eat.” Never before published in English, the first edition of the Brothers Grimms’ tales reveals an unsanitised version of the stories that have been told at bedtime for more than 200 years.

The Grimms – Jacob and Wilhelm – published their first take on the tales for which they would become known around the world in December 1812, a second volume following in 1815. They would go on to publish six more editions, polishing the stories, making them more child-friendly, adding in Christian references and removing mentions of fairies before releasing the seventh edition – the one best known today – in 1857.

Jack Zipes, professor emeritus of German and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota, says he often wondered why the first edition of the tales had never been translated into English, and decided, eventually, to do it himself. “Though the Grimms kept about 100 of the tales from the first edition, they changed them a good deal. So, the versions with which most English-speaking (and German-speaking) readers are familiar are quite different from the tales in the first edition,” he told the Guardian.

His version of the original 156 stories is just out from Princeton University Press, illustrated by Andrea Dezsö, and shows a very different side to the well-known tales, as well as including some gruesome new additions.

How the Children Played at Slaughtering, for example, stays true to its title, seeing a group of children playing at being a butcher and a pig. It ends direly: a boy cuts the throat of his little brother, only to be stabbed in the heart by his enraged mother. Unfortunately, the stabbing meant she left her other child alone in the bath, where he drowned. Unable to be cheered up by the neighbours, she hangs herself; when her husband gets home, “he became so despondent that he died soon thereafter”. The Children of Famine is just as disturbing: a mother threatens to kill her daughters because there is nothing else to eat. They offer her slices of bread, but can’t stave off her hunger: “You’ve got to die or else we’ll waste away,” she tells them. Their solution: “We’ll lie down and sleep, and we won’t get up again until the Judgement Day arrives.” They do; “no one could wake them from it. Meanwhile, their mother departed, and nobody knows where she went.”

Rapunzel, meanwhile, gives herself away to her captor when – after having a “merry time” in the tower with her prince - she asks: “Tell me, Mother Gothel, why are my clothes becoming too tight? They don’t fit me any more.” And the stepmothers of Snow White and Hansel and Gretel were, originally, their mothers, Zipes believing that the Grimms made the change in later editions because they “held motherhood sacred”. So it is Snow White’s own mother who orders the huntsman to “stab her to death and bring me back her lungs and liver as proof of your deed. After that I’ll cook them with salt and eat them”, and Hansel and Gretel’s biological mother who abandons them in the forest.

Zipes speculates that the Grimms’ changes were “reflecting sociologically a condition that existed during their lifetime - jealousy between a young stepmother and stepdaughter”, because “many women died from childbirth in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and there were numerous instances in which the father remarried a young woman, perhaps close in age to the father’s eldest daughter”.

Cinderella’s stepsisters go to extraordinary attempts to win the prince in the original Grimms version of the tale, slicing off parts of their feet to fit the golden slipper - to no avail, in the end, because the prince spots the blood spilling out of the shoe. “Here’s a knife,” their mother urges, in Zipes’ translation. “If the slipper is still too tight for you, then cut off a piece of your foot. It will hurt a bit. But what does that matter?”


Not such innocent fun … an illustration from the new translation of How Some Children Played at Slaughtering. Illustration: © Andrea Dezsö/PR
Zipes describes the changes made as “immense”, with around 40 or 50 tales in the first edition deleted or drastically changed by the time the seventh edition was published. “The original edition was not published for children or general readers. Nor were these tales told primarily for children. It was only after the Grimms published two editions primarily for adults that they changed their attitude and decided to produce a shorter edition for middle-class families. This led to Wilhelm’s editing and censoring many of the tales,” he told the Guardian.

Wilhelm Grimm, said Zipes, “deleted all tales that might offend a middle-class religious sensitivity”, such as How Some Children Played at Slaughtering. He also “added many Christian expressions and proverbs”, continued Zipes, stylistically embellished the tales, and eliminated fairies from the stories because of their association with French fairy tales. “Remember, this is the period when the French occupied Germany during the Napoleonic wars,” said Zipes. “So, in Briar Rose, better known as Sleeping Beauty, the fairies are changed into wise women. Also, a crab announces to the queen that she will become pregnant, not a frog.”

The original stories, according to the academic, are closer to the oral tradition, as well as being “more brusque, dynamic, and scintillating”. In his introduction to The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, in which Marina Warner says he has “redrawn the map we thought we knew”, and made the Grimms’ tales “wonderfully strange again”, Zipes writes that the originals “retain the pungent and naive flavour of the oral tradition”, and that they are “stunning narratives precisely because they are so blunt and unpretentious”, with the Grimms yet to add their “sentimental Christianity and puritanical ideology”.

But they are still, he believes, suitable bedtime stories. “It is time for parents and publishers to stop dumbing down the Grimms’ tales for children,” Zipes told the Guardian. The Grimms, he added, “believed that these tales emanated naturally from the people, and the tales can be enjoyed by both adults and children. If there is anything offensive, readers can decide what to read for themselves. We do not need puritanical censors to tell us what is good or bad for us.”

To order The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm for £21.21 (RRP £24.95) go to bookshop.theguardian.com or call 0330 333 6846.

Via Charles Tiayon
Chéri Vausé's insight:

I recall the bloody incident of lopping off toes in the Cinderella story as a child. Grimm did have a bit of gore back then, too... a hundred years ago when these stories were read to me. Not all of it was excised like the retellings today. These stories were originally told to teach valuable lessons to children, to frighten them to be good and do what they were told by their parents. They also kept children from going into certain places where they could be harmed. If your parents told you that a ghost, or a troll, or some kind of an evil presence was in there, wouldn't you stay away? Most children would. Only a few adventurous children might.

 

It should be interesting reading, and very telling about how much the world has changed, and how cynical we've become by neutering everything into nonexistence. The power of the stories lies in the idea that horrible things do happen, and all parents want is to keep their children safe from the cruel world.

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The REAL Meanings Of These 30 Common Words Will Surprise You

The REAL Meanings Of These 30 Common Words Will Surprise You | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it
'Video' means "I see." 'Lady' means "bread-maker." Delving into the origins and etymologies of words often unearths some unexpected stories....

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Chéri Vausé's insight:

Every author should have a dictionary on their desk, along with the thesaurus. Using the thesaurus only could cause you to use a word incorrectly, and your writing could be construed as misleading. I recommend the Oxford English Dictionary. The examples themselves are treasures, and they teach us how to use the word, as well as, how it has been used throughout history.

 

I love words. Words are fabulous, wonderful inventions.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 12, 5:26 PM

12 November 2014

 

Teach roots, prefixes, and suffixes? Here's a list of fairly commonly used words with interesting origins. A close inspections reveals that either the roots, prefixes, and/or suffixes actually give insight into the words etymological development. And, in understanding the origins of words as they are used today, can be, (but too often perhaps, is not) an engagement point for students as is relies upon an almost innate curiosity for the story behind the word rather than merely upon linking a word to it's dictionary definition on a test.

 

A rhetorical challenge...

What other words have historical stories that might make the words more attractive to "know" than the "it will be on the test" incentive??

 

Did you notice that the word "lady" comes from traditional gender-roles that today may be considered sexist?

 

Isn't that HYSTERICAL? (Yes, that was an intentional use of a word many students use without knowing it's origins)

 

What about the word "manufacture"? It's actually defined as "the making of articles on a large scale using machinery." Yet, its origin, as those who speak a bit of Spanish, French, Italian, or Latin  might guess, is, "something made by hand." The irony, of course being that much of today's "manufacturing" is done without the use of actual hands or even humans for that matter.

 

Other words?

 

 

Sometimes it's more successful to teach what makes a word interesting than it is to teach what dictionary definition goes with what word.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

Aileenexa's curator insight, November 12, 11:12 PM
dfs
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What Your Pronunciation of These Words Tells Other People

What Your Pronunciation of These Words Tells Other People | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it
Subjects were asked how they pronounce certain words, and what they thought about people who said them differently.

Via Jukka Melaranta
Chéri Vausé's insight:

Are we putting people off if we pronounce words differently than those around us? The answer would be yes and no, depending on the crowd. Words do have meaning, contrary to some popular politicos trying to convince us otherwise, but the way we talk can move people either away from us or toward us, in spite of content. In some crowds, if you pronounce words correctly according to their origin (foreign words to us Americans) then you could be seen as "putting on airs" if the place you are standing is on a street corner. But, if you're with an academic crowd they would appreciate you pronouncing the word correctly.

 

Being genuine is more important than trying to impress a person or a crowd. If you pronounce a word according to its origin, and the listener learns you aren't the sort to put on airs, then go against the American grain, say it the way it should be pronounced. My goal when speaking is to be correct, not to sound haughty. And, I don't take offense if someone corrects me. Being clear is important.

 

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Shema' Yisrael - Biblical Archaeology Society

Shema' Yisrael - Biblical Archaeology Society | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it
According to a recent article in Biblical Archaeology Review, the Shema' Yisrael on this Jewish amulet discovered near Carnuntum is one of the earliest monotheistic readings of Deuteronomy. The Shema' Yisrael from ...
Chéri Vausé's insight:

Terrific find. The Sh'ma is the first prayer after the Exodus and the giving of the Law.

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Gabriel Stone: Jerusalem Unveils Mysterious Hebrew Tablet (PHOTOS) - Huffington Post

Gabriel Stone: Jerusalem Unveils Mysterious Hebrew Tablet (PHOTOS) - Huffington Post | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it
Gabriel Stone: Jerusalem Unveils Mysterious Hebrew Tablet (PHOTOS)
Huffington Post
... Temple, Archaeologists Say.
Chéri Vausé's insight:

Israel is an artifact rich environment. We've only just begun to discover what might be under the layers of dirt in Jerusalem. Perhaps, my novel premise might be right, there is a pathway to the Cave of Abraham, and Eden, waiting to be uncovered by some intrepid archaeologist. It's nice to think about.

 

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Mystery Alignment of Dying Stars Puzzles Scientists

Mystery Alignment of Dying Stars Puzzles Scientists | The Garden of Souls | Scoop.it

Dying stars that are among the most beautiful objects in the universe line up across the night sky, and astronomers aren't sure why. These "cosmic butterflies" — actually a certain type of planetary nebula — all have their own formation histories, and they don't interact with each other. But something is apparently making them dance in step, scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope (NTT) have discovered.

 

"This really is a surprising find and, if it holds true, a very important one,"study lead author Bryan Rees, of the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, said in a statement. "Many of these ghostly butterflies appear to have their long axes aligned along the plane of our galaxy. By using images from both Hubble and the NTT we could get a really good view of these objects, so we could study them in great detail."

 

In the final stages of their lives, stars like our own sun puff their outer layers into space, creating strange and striking objects known as planetary nebulas. (No planets are necessarily involved. The term was coined by famed astronomer Sir William Herschel to describe celestial bodies that appeared to have circular, planet-like shapes when viewed through early telescopes.)

Rees and co-author Albert Zijlstra, also of the University of Manchester, studied 130 planetary nebulae in the central bulge of the Milky Way galaxy.

They found most of these objects to be scattered more or less randomly across the sky, but one type — the bipolar nebulae, which have distinctive butterfly or hourglass shapes that are thought to result when jets blast material away from a dying star perpendicular to its orbit — showed a surprising alignment.

 

"The alignment we're seeing for these bipolar nebulae indicates something bizarre about star systems within the central bulge,"Rees said. "For them to line up in the way we see, the star systems that formed these nebulae would have to be rotating perpendicular to the interstellar clouds from which they formed, which is very strange."

 

Faraway bipolar nebulae display this predilection much more than nearby cosmic butterflies do, the researchers said. They suspect that the orderly behavior may have been caused by strong magnetic fields present when the galaxy's central bulge was forming.

 

But little is known about the characteristics of the Milky Way's magnetic fields in the distant past, so the planetary nebula alignment remains mysterious for now. "We can learn a lot from studying

 these objects,"Zijlstra said in a statemnt. "If they really behave in this unexpected way, it has consequences for not just the past of individual stars, but for the past of our whole galaxy."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Chéri Vausé's insight:

My character Avi, in the Garden of Souls, is shown the origins of the universe. God has created a beautiful universe, filled with wonders. This is just a glimpse into it.

more...
No comment yet.