The Future of Waste
Follow
3.9K views | +1 today
Scooped by Adam Johnson
onto The Future of Waste
Scoop.it!

Whitehorse recycling machine will turn discarded plastic into home heating - Toronto Star

Whitehorse recycling machine will turn discarded plastic into home heating - Toronto Star | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
Toronto StarWhitehorse recycling machine will turn discarded plastic into home heatingToronto StarOne of only two recycling facilities in Whitehorse, the depot previously had to pay to ship the city's recyclable waste 2,370 kilometres to Vancouver,...
more...
No comment yet.
The Future of Waste
Articles mapping out the future of waste. Blogs at www.garbologie.com
Curated by Adam Johnson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Pallettable Spaces - Made from Construction Site Leftovers!

Pallettable Spaces - Made from Construction Site Leftovers! | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Reusing old timber, this amazing structure was built using reclaimed timber.

 

I can't help thinking that this sort of idea would be a great application for the thousands of tonnes of CCA treated timber that has been left from the destruction of Christchurch in New Zealand.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Hello Compost: Trading Food Waste for Local, Healthy Food

Hello Compost: Trading Food Waste for Local, Healthy Food | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Hello Compost is a service being piloted in New York that incentivises families to collect their food waste by giving them credits towards fresh produce for each pound of food waste they bring.


People bring their food waste to a Project EATS market, where it is weighed and a credit toward produce is given to the people. The food waste is composted and sold commercially to fund the service.


Presumably the fact that the food waste is uncontaminated means that the compost is quite valuable (unlike compost from general municipal waste). 


A great idea connecting food with waste.


Relevant sites:

Hello Compost: https://www.facebook.com/HelloCompost

Project EATS: http://projecteats.org/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

How Tim Hortons closed the loop with coffee cups

How Tim Hortons closed the loop with coffee cups | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
The coffee and donut giant has diverted thousands of paper cups from landfill by turning them into trays.

 

The way it works is that Tim Hortons shops have recycling units collecting hot beverage cups, lids, napkins and trays. Collection contractors and paper haulers take the stuff to Scotia Recycling Limited, which sorts and compresses recycled products into bales. The bales are delivered to CKF, a Canadian-owned paper product manufacturer based in Nova Scotia, which then processes the bales, molding them into new trays that can be sold back to Tim Hortons restaurants.


This story focuses on the recycling element. Tim Hortons also offers incentives to use reusable cups. No doubt this recycling approach is needed because a lot of coffee goes out in disposable cups.


Relevant sites:

Tim Hortons: http://sustainabilityreport.timhortons.com/planet_restaurants_initiatives.html#env

Scotia Recycling: http://scotiarecyclinggroup.com/

CKF: http://www.ckfinc.com/Home/tabid/41/language/en-US/Default.aspx

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Circular economy hub

Circular economy hub | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

The Guardian has recently launced a circular economy hub. It is a very exciting development, as it incirporates a sense of the business model alongside the technology.

 

To use the words of the Guardian, the circular economy is "a radically different business model from the linear one we are used to, and a compelling concept. Keeping resources in the economy for longer means diverting valuable materials from landfill and reducing the energy, land and water use necessary for primary production"


It is exactly what this Scoop.it magazine is about, and hopefully the hub will move from strength to strength.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

New space junk disposal effort

New space junk disposal effort | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

A simple solution for the problem of space junk.

 

At the end of the life of a spacecraft's life, a 200 m long wire is deployed that acts as a brake, slowing the spacecraft enough to burn up in the atmosphere.

 

Reinforcing the fact that the problem of rubbish exists everywhere.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Restaurant sells food in edible packaging

Restaurant sells food in edible packaging | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

WikiBar in Paris only offers customers foods that come in an edible container.

 

As the article concludes, could this be the future of package-free food?

 

Relevant site:

Wikipearl: www.wikipearl.com 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Additives for mechanical plastic recycling - BASF

Additives for mechanical plastic recycling - BASF | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

An interesting article about the work BASF is doing with additives to ensure that recycled plastics perform as well or better than virgin product across a range of products.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Russian waste tyre recycling plant ships to Colombia

Russian waste tyre recycling plant ships to Colombia | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

An article about a plant shipped by the Russian Technokomplex company to Colombia indicates an interesting take on tyre recycling. A pyrolysis plant, it converts 5 tonnes/day of waste tyres intol liquid fuel, carbon black, steel and gas to run the plant.

 

In a market where there are many vendors promoting pyrolysis solutions to waste tyres, it is hard to know whether this is a real solution or a partial solution like so many others have proven to be. This may be worthy of further research at some point.

 

Relevant site:

Technokomplex Pirotex: http://www.tkomplex.ru/en/products/pirotex

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Worm composting turns trash to treasure

Worm composting turns trash to treasure | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Dealing with food waste from the home or small restaurant by composting can be difficult. However, using worms to achieve the same outcome can be straightforward and achieve good outcomes.

 

This article gives a good outline of how it all works.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Ford Seat Fabric from recycled materials

Ford Seat Fabric from recycled materials | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

The Ford Mondeo (Ford Fusion in USA) is the first global vehicle program to use seat fabric made from recycled material, with the potential to recycle enough plastic bottles and post-industrial waste to make 1.4 million metres of fabric annually.

 

One of the suppliers is Unifi, which has developed a yarn branded Repreve. Repreve is a polyester yarn made from recycled PET bottles.

 

Creating a world of no waste means that markets for recycled materials must be strong and diverse. Steps such as this are steps in the right direction.

 

Relevant site:

Repreve: http://www.repreve.com/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Hospital PVC Recycling Pilot Programme

Hospital PVC Recycling Pilot Programme | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Hospitals in two Australian states have recycled 15 tonnes of PVC waste, turning it into industrial hoses and non-slip floor mats.

 

The hospitals are part of a recycling programme, PVC Recovery in Hospitals, sponsored by the Vinyl Council of Australia in conjunction with manufacturers.

 

Plastics apparently make up about one third of hospital waste, and PVC makes up 25% of that.

 

It is hoped that the programme will expand rapidly now, with education packets prepared for the hospitals.

more...
EnviroJMS's curator insight, September 17, 2013 4:57 PM

An ideal article showing the importance of recycling in hospitals, because some of the products used in hospitals can be very harmful to the environment. 

 

- Aphiwe Khambule.

Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Public-private partnerships turn waste into cash

Public-private partnerships turn waste into cash | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

This is a great thing to see - an explicit recognition of the value of waste. Indeed, the article even takes a similar tack to what I've been advocating. Rather than calling these materials "waste", call them "byproducts" and seek to maximise the information surface area so that the waste can be used.

 

This particular article refers to how the public sector is helping the private sector make these connections. Imagine the power when the free-wheeling dynamism of entrepreneurial business gets in on the act!

more...
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Kenyan company turns sea garbage into colourful toys

Kenyan company turns sea garbage into colourful toys | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Flip-flop sandals once harmed wildlife on beaches; now Kenya’s Ocean Sole sandal recycling company is making them into eco-friendly merchandise

 

Relevant site:

Ocean Sole: http://www.ocean-sole.com/

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adam Johnson from Sustainable Futures
Scoop.it!

Can the economy go full circle?

Can the economy go full circle? | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

The circular economy, recycling products after use, is cheap and environmentally friendly – but is it up to companies, consumers or the government to drive it forward? Sponsored feature A circular economy has long been a very good idea.


Via Flora Moon
Adam Johnson's insight:

The Guardian is doing some great work on the circular economy - the hub is a great development.

more...
Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, October 3, 2013 6:49 PM

There is a simple way to motivate rapid change in a fair and self-regulating way:  Include in the cost of goods and services the full cost of removing and recycling 100% of waste.   That includes all waste and pollution resulting from mining, production, etc.   

 

If we don't pay the full cost now, guess who ends up paying many times more?  Think of the children.

Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Will.i.am: 'Let's make plastic a verb'

Will.i.am: 'Let's make plastic a verb' | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

A great interview with a somewhat eccentric will.i.am about waste and technology and disruption. It mirrors a lot of what I've been saying. I do think that a step change really is possible.


Some extracts from the interview:

The reason why a city doesn't recycle is because people don't see waste as a commodity. They see waste as waste. I was like wow, with the technology we have today it's only waste because we waste the opportunity to turn it into something else. So let's not recycle, let's upcycle.

We have designed a system where you purchase something, it breaks and you throw it away and it's not useful in the next cycle but you still value the brand that produced it. That's some new shit and not what it was like when my grandma was in her 20s. In 1930 you purchased something that would last forever. There is a reason why antiques are antiques. The iPhone is never going to be a fucking antique because it's not going to work when it gets to that age

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Recycling is manufacturing: Creative business opportunities in recycled materials

Recycling is manufacturing: Creative business opportunities in recycled materials | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

An interesting article about a shift in thinking in Humboldt County, California about the opportunity presented by recycling as remanufacturing rather than landfill diversion.

 

The ideas expressed here neatly encapsulate my own thinking on "a world without waste", that it is more about entrepreneur led opportunity than government mandate.

 

From the article:

"Humboldt County will be able to benefit from this win-win situation the way we always get things done: creative problem-solvers working cooperatively to produce new products made from recycled materials, open new markets, and achieve the economy-of-scale necessary to grow our businesses."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Separating e-waste into constituent components

Separating e-waste into constituent components | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

ATMI has developed eVolv, a very interesting technology for recycling e-waste, essentialy separating out the precious metals for reinserting back into the productive economy as raw materials:

 

The process is completed in a closed-loop system using a series of chemical baths, and desoldering techniques which reclaim much of the precious metal components for reuse. This technique is 99 percent sustainable, and can be implemented locally, directly in a manufacturer's warehouse. This approach also helps to relieve the global issue of e-Waste being broken down in poorer regions of the world where it affects human welfare, and the environment.


This was announced almost a year ago, however the eVolve website doesn't give any case studies of where the technology has been deployed. Perhaps something worth watching.

 

Relevant site:

ATMI - http://www.atmi-evolv.com/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Biodegradable cigarette filter helps clear streets of discarded butts

Biodegradable cigarette filter helps clear streets of discarded butts | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Cigarette butts are the most commonly reported item in litter counts. That is partially because they are so small and easy to think that tossing one away will make no difference, but also because they last so long (up to 15 years, and even then they don't degrade).

 

Greenbutts is a new filter that will biodegrade in a few weeks. This could be a very good thing for addressing litter.

 

The people behind the filter plan to have it on the market by 2014.

 

Relevant site:

Greenbutts: http://www.green-butts.com/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Animal coffin - recycled waste materials to form a memorial coffin

Animal coffin - recycled waste materials to form a memorial coffin | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Animal Coffin is made from the materials coffee grounds, potato starch, flour, human hair and cardboard.

 

Animal Coffin is a biodegradable coffin made from recycled waste materials with flower- and tree seeds embedded. A tree will grow where the beloved animal is buried, thus providing a long-lasting memorial.

 

By giving waste material a second life Animal Coffin both provides an alternative for waste handling, conserves new resources and provides the opportunity to bid farewell of a beloved pet.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Optisort - Advanced waste battery sorting

Optisort - Advanced waste battery sorting | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

The Optisort Battery Sorter (OBS) uses a combination of computer vision and advanced classification technology to identify batteries based on brand, model, year and chemistry. Once the data is processed, batteries are then separated using compressed air techniques.

 

The information garnered by the OBS provides waste management companies and industry associations with a better understanding of battery recycling flows.

 

A quote from Hans Eric Melin, CEO of Optisort, sums it up perfectly: “As batteries can be processed on a case-by-case basis, it opens up numerous business and environmental opportunities for recyclers, compliance schemes and manufacturers".


This data shared publicly could initiate an explosion of innovation around the manufacture, collection and recycling of batteries.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Like Recycling but Better: Upcycling

Like Recycling but Better: Upcycling | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

The philosophy of upcycling is, broadly, that the stuff you throw away shouldn't just return to the marketplace to be reused, it should come back enhanced.


There are a number of companies leading the way with upcycling, including Yerdle, Upcycle It Now and Patagonia. Each takes a different approach to the challenge, each leading in their own way.


Relevant sites:

Yerdle: http://www.yerdle.com/

Upcycle It Now: http://www.upcycleitnow.com/

Patagonia: http://www.patagonia.com/us/common-threads/

more...
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Boeing and Alcoa Form 'Closed-Loop' Programme To Boost Recycling of Aluminium Aerospace Alloys

Boeing and Alcoa Form 'Closed-Loop' Programme To Boost Recycling of Aluminium Aerospace Alloys | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Boeing and Alcoa have formed a "Closed Loop" Programme to improve the recycling of aluminium aerospace alloys.

 

The programme will improve the recycling of 2XXX and 7XXX series aluminium alloys used in wing and fuselage components. It is reported that about 8 million points of aluminium (3,600 tonnes) is expected to be recycled annually.

 

The programme will also provide the infrastructure to expand the programme to improving recycling from Boeing sub-contractors, and to incorporate other aluminium scrap forms.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Recycling double glazing units

Recycling double glazing units | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

A great story about an English company that specialises in recycling double glazing units (windows and doors).

 

GB Cullet recycles about 400,000 tonnes of material each year, collecting unwanted double glazing units from 130 sites across the north of England, the Midlands, Scotland and South Wales.

 

The converted broken glass is used by specialist manufacturers to make new windows, bottles and jars, as well as loft insulation and the reflective beads used in road surfaces.

 

Every by-product in the GB Cullet process, including the uPVC frames, wood, aluminium and cardboard packaging is 100 per cent recycled and sold on.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Tailoring recycling messages to politics

Tailoring recycling messages to politics | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

A very interesting study that found recycling can be bolstered by tailoring recycling messages to reflect political leanings.

 

Thus, for conservatives, messaging that promoted duty and authority improved recycling performance. Similarly, for liberals, messages focused on the general good and reducing harm were effective.

 

Importantly, getting the messaging wrong seems to have only led to a neutral effect, not a negative effect.

 

Understanding how to communicate in a way that resonates with our audience is very important if we are to create a world without waste.

more...
Jill Duncan's curator insight, September 23, 2013 5:37 PM

Recycling politics

Scooped by Adam Johnson
Scoop.it!

Trex retools film recycling program in Southern California

Trex retools film recycling program in Southern California | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Trex Co. Inc is revamping its thin-film collection and recycling programme in Southern California. The programme initially started in 2008 but faded, in large part because of technical issues. The old balers apparently struggled with reliability, and the large bales were difficult to manage. The revamped programme uses compressed-air mini-balers that produce bales weighing a little over 20 kg.

 

Trex makes composite decking from the bags, with the bags comprising more than 95% recycled content. The key components are polyethylene plastics and sawdust.

 

Relevant site: 

 

Trex Co. Inc: http://www.trex.com/index.html

more...
No comment yet.