The Future of Technology with Brain Computer Interface
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The Future of Technology with Brain Computer Interface
The Future of Technology with Brain Computer Interface
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Futurity.org – Brain cap morphs thought into motion

Futurity.org – Brain cap morphs thought into motion | The Future of Technology with Brain Computer Interface | Scoop.it

For the study, reported in the Journal of Neurophysiology.Contreras-Vidal successfully used EEG brain signals to reconstruct the complex 3-D movements of the ankle, knee, and hip joints during human treadmill walking. Two earlier studies showed (1) similar results for 3-D hand movement and (2) that subjects wearing the brain cap could control a computer cursor with their thoughts.


Via lut3r0
Nic Dixon's insight:

The subject of the article (associate professor of kinesiology from the University of Maryland) is quoted as saying that within a few years [from 2011, the publishing date] BCI will be reliable and lifechanging for medical purposes.

 

This article talks about the rising popularity of scalpal EEG as opposed to implanted electrodes, and that the previous argument (that the skull was too inhibitive to the recording of brain wave signals with sufficient resolution) is invalid.

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BCI - Brain to Control Games Directly, Maybe Vice Versa

BCI - Brain to Control Games Directly, Maybe Vice Versa | The Future of Technology with Brain Computer Interface | Scoop.it
Medical practitioners raise concerns about a new breed of videogame that would allow users to control gameplay using thoughts alone.
Nic Dixon's insight:

This editorial points out several of the drawbacks. While it is not peer-reviewed, it features information from a range of important sources, such as the United States Food and Drug administration and leading BCI producers Emotiv and NeuroSky. 

 

Health concerns raised include difficult in focusing following BCI sessions, which creates further concerns that it may lead to long term attention deficits. 

 

The Food and Drug administration considers the immediate role of BCI to be restricted to relaxation and rehabilitative purposes, while the BCI companies insist that developers with the potential drawbacks in mind can innovate and create purely entertaining/utilitarian niches.

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The Future of BCI

The Future of BCI | The Future of Technology with Brain Computer Interface | Scoop.it
Nic Dixon's insight:

This article explores the history of BCI, and aims to predict where BCI will be in the future. This article ties in particularly closely with the subject of the essay.

 

The author predicts that over the next 5 years, BCI development will be spurred by organisational support (among other things). This ties in with other articles demonstrating the presence of companies like Microsoft with an interest in the BCI space. The author also predicts that after 5 years, BCI will begin to feature in widespread everyday application, but alongside existing (although presumably improved) "natural input" technologies such as touch and speech input. 

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Brain-Computer Interface Using Single-Channel Electroencephalography

Brain-Computer Interface Using Single-Channel Electroencephalography | The Future of Technology with Brain Computer Interface | Scoop.it
Nic Dixon's insight:

This article is a wealth of information. It introduces BCI and EEG/ERP, and touches on the basics (that scalpal or extra-cranial electrode placement may not be as resolutionally precise as implanted electrodes, but allows a greater area of the brain to be covered).

 

The authors emulated a classic game (Pong), using BCI for control input. The rationale for their initiative was that through it may lead to benefits in other areas beyond game design, such as assisting disabled persons and for the study and treatment of behavioural disorders). 

 

This is a particularly detailed report, particularly in terms of the formulae used to discern . This is clearly an effort on the part of the authors to demonstrate a highly valid and scientific paper, despite it being self-published as opposed to appearing in a peer-reviewed publication. I feel that it meets the standard of quality sought.

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PLAYING WITH BRAIN-COMPUTER INTERFACES. An interview with Anton Nijholt (University of Twente) - Interattivo

PLAYING WITH BRAIN-COMPUTER INTERFACES. An interview with Anton Nijholt (University of Twente) - Interattivo | The Future of Technology with Brain Computer Interface | Scoop.it
Operating machines or playing videogames just with our thoughts is not science fiction anymore.
Nic Dixon's insight:

This article is a transcript of an interview from the CHI conference, held in 2008. The interviewee, a Dutch professor of computer science, talks in general terms about BCI, its benefits and ways to drive innovation. 

 

The role of BCI, he says, covers things such as medical applications (prosthetics/providing functionality for disabilities), practical jobs/tasks (e.g. pilotting aircraft), home automation, and gaming/entertainment.

 

While the medical applications are "already there", in order to achieve results in the other areas key challenges must be overcome, such as training time, reducing measurement requirements, and the disadvantages of bulk associated with systems (i.e. introduction of wireless and nano-technologies).

 

The purpose for doing these of course is to drive innovation - game development for BCI is not goal-oriented like other applications. There is no problem to be solved, and therefore the extra freedom drives innocation.

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Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface | ExtremeTech

Brown University creates first wireless, implanted brain-computer interface | ExtremeTech | The Future of Technology with Brain Computer Interface | Scoop.it
Researchers at Brown University have succeeded in creating the first wireless, implantable, rechargeable, long-term brain-computer interface.
Nic Dixon's insight:

The bulkiness that was described as a major obstacle by Anton Nijholt in his interview 5 years ago is finally improved upon as far as implanted BCI is concerned, in this article.

 

This article's recency is its most notable aspect, being only a few weeks old. The importance of that article is in the assertion that where previously, only lab-based experiments could be done, now data from quasi-experimental studies can be used, where the participants engage in more real-world activity. This could significantly accelerate the rate at which BCI technology begins to improve.

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