The Future of Smart Cities
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Siemens launches smart city in Vienna

Siemens launches smart city in Vienna | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it
Located in the Aspern district in Vienna, the project will connect building systems with intelligent power grids and ICT technologies that interact.

Via Rob Kitchin
Claudia Correia de Araujo's insight:

Smart cities start with citizen engagement

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Rescooped by Claudia Correia de Araujo from Cool Future Technologies
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IBM Solar Collector Concentrates Light with the Power of 2,000 Suns

IBM Solar Collector Concentrates Light with the Power of 2,000 Suns | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it

A team of IBM researchers is working on a solar concentrating dish that will be able to collect 80% of incoming sunlight and convert it to useful energy.

 

The High Concentration Photovoltaic Thermal system will be able to concentrate the power of 2,000 suns while delivering fresh water and cool air wherever it is built.

 

As an added bonus, IBM states that the system would be just one third the cost third of current comparable technologies.


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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, April 28, 2013 1:25 PM

Some progress on concentrated solar thermal energy generation ... coming from IBM this time.

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Electricity generation from renewable sources worldwide will exceed that from gas and nuclear by 2016

Electricity generation from renewable sources worldwide will exceed that from gas and nuclear by 2016 | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it

Electricity generation from renewable sources worldwide will exceed that from gas and be twice that from nuclear power by 2016 says the International Energy Agency.

 

The IEA says renewable power is expected to jump by 40% in the next five years and will make up almost a quarter of the global power mix by2018. The prediction is in the IEA’s second annual Medium-Term Renewable Energy Market Report... 


Via Sepp Hasslberger
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, June 28, 2013 3:37 PM

It is good to see there's progress towards getting off fossil fuels, but we still have a ways to go ... and there are new free energy technologies being developed that may bring us there even faster.

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Living Lab: Urban Planning Goes Digital in Spanish 'Smart City' | SPIEGEL ONLINE

Living Lab: Urban Planning Goes Digital in Spanish 'Smart City' | SPIEGEL ONLINE | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it

 

Cities around the world aim to become "smart cities," but in Santander, Spain, the goal has already become a reality. Thousands of sensors help alert residents to traffic jams, regulate the watering in city parks and dim the street lamps.

 

Cities all around the world have set the same goal for themselves. Amsterdam, Barcelona, Birmingham, Dubai, Helsinki, San Diego, Stockholm, Nanjing, Vienna, Yokohama -- they all share an aspiration to become "smart cities."

 

That sounds like an appealing aim, yet when urban planners try to explain more precisely how they plan to lead their cities into the digital future, their answers are less convincing, with each proposing a different plan. Despite the many symposiums that have been held on this subject, there is no consensus on how to pursue this ambition.

 

Essentially the only thing all parties can agree on is that "smart" cities will employ sensors, computers and smartphones, and they will implement new forms of city government, making administrative processes more transparent than ever before. The idea is that digital technology will help make urban living cleaner, more sustainable and more pleasant. And, of course, it should increase prosperity as well.

 

Amid this uncertainty, an old port city on Spain's Atlantic coast has surged to the forefront of those aspiring to be smart cities. Despite its cash-strapped finances, the city of Santander, birthplace of the major bank of the same name, is already quite smart.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Laura Graziani's curator insight, June 8, 2015 7:07 AM

SMART CITY

L'esempio virtuoso di SANTANDER

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Sensor Networks and City Services | Susan Crawford | Data-Smart City Solutions

Sensor Networks and City Services | Susan Crawford | Data-Smart City Solutions | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it

 

Smartphones can be delivery devices for society's services. For cities, educators, healthcare providers, and everyone else who wants to provide assistance to citizens in a cheaper, more efficient way, making a smartphone app available is a common move.

 

About half of all Americans have smartphones, and all smartphone users keep these devices close at hand. So city managers who want to reach people where they are most likely to pay attention, and who hope to provide information when it's most useful, are planning to use the affordances of smartphones.

 

These devices are loaded with appealing attributes: bright, arresting screens; programmable ability to download and run apps; Internet access; digital compasses and gyroscopes; cameras; GPS, allowing for delivery of location-based services and geo-tagging of communications by the device's user; accelerometers, allowing tilt and gesture-based functionality; microphones; and ambient light sensors. This month, Samsung launched its Galaxy S4, which has a barometer, thermometer, magnetometer, and hygrometer to measure air pressure, temperature, magnetic field strength, and humidity, respectively.  

 

Here's the thing: All of these sensors can also be used to gather information about the device's user and the context of that user's use. You can think of a smartphone as a tracking device that happens to allow voice calls. And the user may have no idea (or have forgotten) that this is going on. Cities will need to think hard about the protocols under which they'll gather information using smartphone apps, because the balance between "creepy" and "keeps us safe/delivers good things" is extraordinarily difficult to strike.

 

Imagine an app that turns on all the microphones in the smartphones in a particular area to track sounds. Useful for finding a lost child; creepy in a business setting. Or imagine an app that automatically turns on the camera in your smartphone when you use that app to hail a cab. Useful for settling disputes, arranging for payment, and putting virtual "eyes on the street"; creepy in almost all other ways – even though Uber is going ahead with that one.

 

It's tantalizing: Managers could measure the wellbeing of their cities by tracking noise levels, social activity (numbers of texts and calls), changing environmental conditions (humidity, temperature, light levels), and congestion. Cities could use smartphones as distributed sensing systems, which would be useful for traffic management in chaotic conditions (remember those accelerometers) and measuring air quality in areas where asthma is a problem.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Anatomy of a Smart City | Postscapes

Anatomy of a Smart City | Postscapes | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it

A full sized infographic of what is helping to create today's 'Smart Cities'. 


The dramatic shift of the world’s population into urban areas is encouraging citizens, city planners, businesses and governments to start looking at visions of ‘smart’ cities.


Below we look into what is driving the need to establish these networked environments, how smart city concepts and projects are different in the developing world, and what technologies and systems are needed to make them a reality.


Via Rob Kitchin
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The 1-minute guide to good conference presentations

The 1-minute guide to good conference presentations | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it

Nicky Hockly: I’ve attended a lot of conferences this year. Attending talks and plenaries is a wonderful opportunity for my own professional development, and I often get to see excellent presenters in action.
During the past few months, I’ve been keeping notes on what makes some of these conference presentations so engaging (and others less so). Here’s a 1-minute guide to being a good conference presenter.


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Working from home? You’re probably working more hours than your colleagues

Working from home? You’re probably working more hours than your colleagues | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it

There are many perks to working from home, but surprisingly, better work-life balance isn’t one of them.

Sure, you can work in your pyjamas and you don’t have to fight the commuter hordes but, as it turns out, you also end up working more.

University of Texas at Austin study finds telecommuters work more hours and find work seeping into their personal lives...


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Enterprise Collaboration with NewsGator at the United States Air Force

For more information, please visit: www.newsgator.com In this video, learn how the United States Air Force is spearheading their collaborative efforts with NewsGator through Air Force Forums, a research program looking to explore the benefits...
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Not just blowing in the wind: Compressing air for renewable energy storage

Not just blowing in the wind: Compressing air for renewable energy storage | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it
A comprehensive study into the potential for compressed air energy storage in the Pacific Northwest has identified two locations in Washington state that could store enough wind energy to power about 85,000 homes each month.

Via Sepp Hasslberger
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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, May 21, 2013 3:40 PM

Compressed air is an ideal way to store energy from those modern day windmills. 

 

The method tends to equal out periods of much wind with those lacking it, and is able to deliver a constant flow of electricity to the net. 

 

It could be made even more efficient if the wind mills would directly compress the air, instead of a triple conversion of wind to electricity, electricity to compressed air and compressed air back to electricity. Each step loses some of the energy...

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20 Smart City Technologies for 2013 and Beyond

20 Smart City Technologies for 2013 and Beyond | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it

Santiago Chile announced they’re going to become a “smart city” in 2013, and is just one example of a growing number of areas around the globe preparing and modernizing for the future.


In fact demographers have long predicted the mass urbanization of metropolitan areas across the world. According to the United Nations, by the year 2050, 80% of the world will be living in urban areas. The equivalent of seven Manhattan size cities will be built each year until 2050. For these cities to thrive they must use smart technology to its fullest. Let’s take a look at what’s available now and what’s coming down the pipe...


Via Lauren Moss
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Luiz F. Costa's comment, May 5, 2013 8:44 AM
Excelente iniciativa boa.
Altaira Wallquist's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:30 PM

This article and list goes over tons of new urban ideas that have a lot to do with sustainability and new urbanism. It shows a lot of energy efficient services and smart technology.

 

This connects to the Unit 7 TEK on new urbanism because it shows how urban places are changing for the future and how urban areas working toward sustainability may look in the future. It gives insight into some incoming or possible smart technologies.

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:23 AM

I think this article gives us a peek into the future. As cities develop so does technology. This shows us as technology improves so does the lifestyle of the people from the city. This article talks about how technology could for example improve security in the area by facial recognition and you could have urban farming by using vertical farming.  I believe that we should invest more into technology as it will help us tremendously now and in the future, letting us as the article says for example wirelessly charge every car in the city.

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The Smart City: Science Fiction or Science Fact? - Technology Personalized

The Smart City: Science Fiction or Science Fact? - Technology Personalized | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it

s every aspect of our lives gets increasingly dependent on technology, with every device getting smarter by the minute, we’re rapidly arriving at the point where our cities will become autonomous entities that can think for themselves and make our lives easier, safer and cleaner. These smart cities are not in the realm of science fiction no longer, as more and more city planners are trying to accomplish this goal and some cities around the world are almost there.


Via jean lievens
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Broadband does not a smart city make | Troy Media

Broadband does not a smart city make | Troy Media | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it

 

Most people talking about the intelligent or smart city are focusing on the relatively narrow aspects of ensuring widespread broadband provision.

I would argue that, while it is an important enabler, broadband alone doesn’t make a smart city. We have to look beyond the technology to think about the kind of city we want to be.

 

This means thinking about how we will create a truly sustainable, viable and vibrant environment – one which attracts business, has a strong creative and leisure sector, an energised academic community and positive prospects for families and individuals. This means thinking well beyond short term challenges to explore how we can evolve in rapidly evolving world where advances in science and technology are rapidly outpacing our ability to absorb their potential impact. (See Preparing for transformational change below).

 

Smart planning means thinking about the world we are moving into, the skillsets our workforce will need and the changing ways in which our children need to be educated with the life skills and outlook to prepare them for a 100-year plus lifespan that could see them needing to work well into their eighties and potentially having five to 10 careers during that period.

 

With finances likely to remain under pressure across the public sector, we also need to be thinking in far more imaginative ways about how we use public buildings. Maybe our schools could become true community resources – housing the local library, community centre and doctor’s surgery, while also operating as both a court and conference and event centre in the evenings, on weekends and during the school holidays.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Siemens launches smart city in Vienna

Siemens launches smart city in Vienna | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it
Located in the Aspern district in Vienna, the project will connect building systems with intelligent power grids and ICT technologies that interact.

Via Rob Kitchin
Claudia Correia de Araujo's insight:

Smart cities start with citizen engagement

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Top 10 Tech This Week

Top 10 Tech This Week | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it
It was another exciting week in technology and gadgetry. Check out our gallery and read the full stories right here on Top 10 Tech.
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Knowledge management and collaboration: Key traits of robust cybersecurity (Part 3) | View from the Top

Knowledge management and collaboration: Key traits of robust cybersecurity (Part 3) | View from the Top | The Future of Smart Cities | Scoop.it
Knowledge management and collaboration: Key traits of robust cybersecurity (Part 3) | View from the...
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