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openfire: Urbsly

openfire: Urbsly | Networked Society | Scoop.it

gribiotech giants are tightening their grip on agriculture worldwide.

 

Rather than trying to fight them directly, Urbsly will help create an alternative system that builds on open standards and data, enabling farmers and gardeners to compete on a level playing field, and ensuring that the technology is available to all.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

"The big agribiotech companies’ strategy over the past few decades has been to buy into the seed industry at all levels, especially by acquiring the big seed producers and their holdings of many thousands of varieties (and, critically, their traits)."

This is a real problem on the horizon, for our food supply. The Urbsly initiative, which starts with the compilation of an open-source catalog of all seed varieties is very important and long overdue...

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Monsanto proves that corporations don't run the government

Collectivists have a favorite target. Big bad corporations. This is a complete scam. Why did Goldman Sachs turn out to be the biggest funder of Obama’s 2008 election bid? Why weren’t the corporate banksters who demanded and received those enormous bailouts, under both Bush and Obama, prosecuted for crimes?

 

Collectivists actually love big corporations. Collectivists just want to distract us from their real goals. And in order to enact those goals, they need banks, they need the military-industrial complex, they need Big Pharma and Big Oil...

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

 

Jon Rappoport says it like it is.

 

Corruption in government is endemic ... and not just in America.

 

"It takes two to tango."

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Ireland: 'Direct Democracy, not just a party, a completely different system

Ben Gilroy explains the fundamental difference between his Direct Democracy Ireland Party and the other main stream parties... And why a vote for him will RETURN real democratic power to the people of Ireland.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

We have to find a better way than what we have - voting for a representative every four or five years and just hoping, against all real experience, that they will do what we think they should be doing. 

 

The problem is becoming really obvious now with politicians backing up the banks and big finance against the interests of the people who elected them.

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Everything you need to know about the piracy-battling Copyright Alert System

Everything you need to know about the piracy-battling Copyright Alert System | Networked Society | Scoop.it

 

The internet providers and copyright holders have begun using peer-to-peer (P2P) surveillance methods to try to sniff out when copyrighted content is uploaded or shared illegally.

 

A company called MarkMonitor has been contracted to join BitTorrent networks (the most common way to illegally share files) and search for the names of copyright-protected movies, music, and TV shows. The list of those names is provided by the MPAA, RIAA, and NCTA.

 

When MarkMonitor finds a file in violation, they snag the IP address of the user who's sharing the file and send it off to that user's internet provider, who issues a series of escalating warnings.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Hollywood has found a way to criminalize sharing. But will all those efforts to catch the criminals who don't intend to be Hollywood's clients end up hastening the movie industry's demise?

 

Perhaps entertainment will be different tomorrow and there will be a more direct line - artist-to-fan and vice versa - that leaves no room for Hollywood.

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The rise of the sharing economy

The rise of the sharing economy | Networked Society | Scoop.it

LAST night 40,000 people rented accommodation from a service that offers 250,000 rooms in 30,000 cities in 192 countries. They chose their rooms and paid for everything online. But their beds were provided by private individuals, rather than a hotel chain.

 

Hosts and guests were matched up by Airbnb, a firm based in San Francisco. Since its launch in 2008 more than 4m people have used it—2.5m of them in 2012 alone. It is the most prominent example of a huge new “sharing economy”, in which people rent beds, cars, boats and other assets directly from each other, co-ordinated via the internet.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

P2P goes mainstream ... how sharing as a philosophy and as an on line practice is going to be a force for change in the mainstream economy.

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Coming soon: Open source operating systems for smartphones and tablets

Coming soon: Open source operating systems for smartphones and tablets | Networked Society | Scoop.it

Built entirely using HTML5 and other open Web standards, Firefox OS is a Linux-based open source operating system for smartphones and tablet computers. It has been demonstrated on Android smartphones and the Raspberry Pi.

 

Samsung and Intel are cooperating on the development of Tizen, another open source phone project situated within the Linux Foundation. The first embodyment of the system in phones will be Bada.

 
Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Phones are in software walled gardens.

 

Most providers have proprietary operating systems for their phones and even Google's Android is not as open as some would like. 

Linux-based Firefox OS and Tizen/Bada to the rescue. 

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re:publica 2012 - Eben Moglen - Freedom of Thought Requires Free Media

Media that spy on and data-mine the public are capable of destroying humanity's most precious freedom: freedom of thought. 

 

Ensuring that media remain structured to support rather than suppress individual freedom and civic virtue requires us to achieve specific free technology and free culture goals.

 

In this talk, Eben Moglen offers suggestions about how the Free World should meet the challenges of the next decade.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Eben Moglen, one of the initiators of the "Freedom Box" project, makes some extremely important points on how to preserve the freedom of thought and the freedom of action we have fought to attain and preserve over the last millennium. 


In the age of social media and commercial software, in the age of governments trying to know everything about everyone, I believe this is of great importance. 

 

Please do take the time (it's about an hour) to watch this video.

 

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Villagers install own fast web cables

Villagers install own fast web cables | Networked Society | Scoop.it
A rural community in Lancashire has decided to fit their own cables for a better broadband connection.
Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Telcos and internet providers are robber barons. They will overcharge for their service and, if you're out in the countryside, you are out in the cold as far as they are concerned. You don't get the service.

 

Will the new p2p internet that is growing here and there eventually make the telcos redundant?

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Shareable: Collaborative Consumption is Overrated

Shareable: Collaborative Consumption is Overrated | Networked Society | Scoop.it

"I still think collaborative consumption is overrated compared to the other side of the sharing economy coin: collaborative creation.

 

The true potential of a networked, peer-to-peer economy is just starting to show with the maker movement. And it's not just about what we can consume together, it's about what we can create together."

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

If we consider a sliding scale that goes from being at the mercy of others (being the effect) to actually producing something useful (being the cause) then consuming, even in collaboration with others, is very much on the effect side of the scale. To be on the cause end of that scale, making (which means inventing, creating, constructing something) is the way to go. 

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Crystal Arnold's curator insight, February 9, 2013 12:35 PM

We are being invited to use our collective intelligence to create, this is where there is an incredible amount of untapped potential. Clearly, meeting our needs through more sharing (collaborative consumption) uses similar skills, and also provides a stable foundation for making a brighter future for generations to come.

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European Citizens Initiative for Unconditional Basic Income accepted by EU Commission

European Citizens Initiative for Unconditional Basic Income accepted by EU Commission | Networked Society | Scoop.it

After an unsuccessful first attempt, the European Citizens’ Initiative for Unconditional Basic Income finally got accepted by the European Commission, thus opening the possibility for the organizers from 14 European countries to start collecting their signatures of support. This is the start of a 12-month European-wide campaign for basic income in Europe. The goal is to collect one million signatures.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

A universal basic income could replace all those various pension schemes, many of which are being stripped of funds to pay for "urgent other expenditures". It could also make us independent of an ever contracting jobs market. As automation takes people out of work, we must devise a way to let everyone contribute to society in other ways than paid work. Basic income could be part of that needed re-organization. 

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MARABUNTA -- Anonymous Distributed P2P Network in Spain

MARABUNTA -- Anonymous Distributed P2P Network in Spain | Networked Society | Scoop.it
Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Marabunta is a free and open networking protocol, software that allows users to communicate while remaining anonymous.

 

In contrast to other efforts, Marabunta achieves anonymity by broadcasting, rather than directly connecting to peers. Each peer has a limited number - something like 15 - of "brothers" forming a cell of the network, which are polled for presence and for news. If one sends a message that is new, it is re-broadcast to the rest of the "brothers". If not new, it is simply eliminated.

In this way, messages (they are like posts on a mailing list) propagate through the network at remarkable speed. Anonymity is relatively easy to achieve as no one connects directly to anyone else to send a specific message, making interception difficult.

 

While Marabunta works on wired networks, its cousin 'Enjambre' is an evolution of the protocol for use in wireless networks. 

A pdf document describing Marabunta (in Spanish) is

"MARABUNTA - P2P Anónimo y descentralizado" at

http://marabunta.laotracara.com/descargas/documentos/marabuntaApeiron.pdf

 

An English description of Marabunta is linked from the headline...

 

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Mission Windmills

Mission Windmills | Networked Society | Scoop.it
Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

 

Dreamups is a creative space to bring together open and simple DIY solutions. About to launch a mission on "windmills"...
"Every quarter we will share a special mission for our community to get involved and make an impact, a simple but valuable one. For now you can move the windmills on Dreamups so we all have enough energy to make it real.

Simple steps to follow... "
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Food Irradiation Supports Agribusiness, Not Health - Gaia Health

Food Irradiation Supports Agribusiness, Not Health - Gaia Health | Networked Society | Scoop.it
Irradiation destroys nutrients and creates poisons. Despite claims, it's largely hidden from us. It exists for the benefit of Agribiz, not for our health.
Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Seriously, we have to become independent from the food industry. Start to grow your own! Just a few vegetables to begin, and then...

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Digital Grab: Corporate Power Has Seized the Internet

Digital Grab: Corporate Power Has Seized the Internet | Networked Society | Scoop.it

“Most assessments of the Internet fail to ground it in political economy; they fail to understand the importance of capitalism in shaping and, for lack of a better term, domesticating the Internet,” says Robert W. McChesney in his illuminating new book, Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism is Turning the Internet Against Democracy.

 

“The profit motive, commercialism, public relations, marketing, and advertising -- all defining features of contemporary corporate capitalism -- are foundational to any assessment of how the Internet has developed and is likely to develop.”

 
Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

The guy is right - corporations have seized (or are trying to seize) control of the internet. But they do not have any idea of how hot an iron they are touching. With the combined power of all the people networked...

 

Someone said yesterday: "I see this as a swan song of corporations. They are doomed."

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Aydin Swanson's curator insight, April 11, 2013 7:23 PM

Aperently the Internet is killing Democracy 

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India: Politicians support genetically modified seeds, while agricultural productivity sets new records in conventional and bio methods

India: Politicians support genetically modified seeds, while agricultural productivity sets new records in conventional and bio methods | Networked Society | Scoop.it

India’s average yield of wheat in 2011 was significantly below the yield from its best lands in 1890.

 

Increasing wheat yield has been the Indian scientists’ focus of effort, which implies that they have consistently short-changed the farmers and wasted public money without showing any results;

 

While the non-performing scientists lived off public money, India’s farmers continued to feed the nation.

 

Many radical farmers achieved record breaking yields from moderately good lands and many marginal hill farmers achieved huge yield gains yet their innovations neither discussed during national planning exercises nor properly studied.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:
This article shows with actual figures that genetic modification and "modern agricultural technologies" are a complete dud compared to traditional and also recent record yields achieved by conventional organic growing methods. Who needs Monsanto? Only the highly bribed politicians, it seems.
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'Homeless' Airbnb founder hails sharing economy

'Homeless' Airbnb founder hails sharing economy | Networked Society | Scoop.it
On any given night, up to 60,000 people stay in places they found on Airbnb. One of them is always the guy who co-founded the fast-growing online travel lodging service.

 

"In June 2010, I moved out of my apartment and I have been mostly homeless ever since, off and on," Brian Chesky said at the South by Southwest (SXSW) interactive, film and music festival.

 

"I just live in Airbnb apartments and I check in every week in different homes in San Francisco," where the company is based, he said. "It's the best way to take the pulse... The key is to always use your product."

(Get the whole article by clicking on the headline here)

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

The sharing economy is taking off. Officially. The Economist, I believe, just had an article on it as well. 

 

http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21573104-internet-everything-hire-rise-sharing-economy

How will it end? Traditional services will look more and more like the p2p alternatives... 

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Allan Savory: How to green the world's deserts and reverse climate change

"Desertification is a fancy word for land that is turning to desert," begins Allan Savory in this quietly powerful talk. And terrifyingly, it's happening to about two-thirds of the world's grasslands, accelerating climate change and causing traditional grazing societies to descend into social chaos.

 

Savory has devoted his life to stopping it.

 

He now believes -- and his work so far shows -- that a surprising factor can protect grasslands and even reclaim degraded land that was once desert."

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

An excellent talk, and hugely important.

 

We are part of this eco-system of planet earth. Unless we understand how it works and what's needed for it to continue to work, we can't be hopeful about the future...

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Bucky Box: Taking Nature's Cues for Creating a Sustainable Food System | Sustainable Brands

Bucky Box: Taking Nature's Cues for Creating a Sustainable Food System | Sustainable Brands | Networked Society | Scoop.it
To understand how we will feed a growing population with decreasing resources and a changing climate, we must shift our mindset to understanding that the food system is a living system.
Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Yes, the food system ... and agriculture ... are in need of reform. Some interesting ideas in this article about a new program (software) allowing better distribution of locally produced food.

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Open Garden - Sharing connections

Open Garden - Sharing connections | Networked Society | Scoop.it

Open Garden shares an internet connection with other devices, using Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. The goal of Open Garden is to share the last mile and promote the openness of wireless networks.

 

It automatically creates a mesh network between all the Open Garden-enabled devices and picks the fastest connection to route traffic. Their Open Garden Mesh Protocol enables people to create their own network.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Reversing the tendency to rely on "closed gardens" (or walled gardens) of phone and net access providers, Open Garden is free software that allows devices to network with one another, sharing available connections to the internet.

 

It's a win-win. Everyone who shares will also be better connected than if they were alone... We should have connectivity everywhere. This is a way to do it without waiting for the providers.

 

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With Batman, Cellphones Get Direct, Device-to-Device Communications

With Batman, Cellphones Get Direct, Device-to-Device Communications | Networked Society | Scoop.it

In an emergency situation where mobile networks are either down or overloaded and there’s no WiFi, cell phones are useless. Unlike land mobile radios, used by police and fire departments, they don’t have the ability to communicate directly with each other. Until now.

 

The Better Approach To Mobile Adhoc Networks (BATMAN) joins smartphones together in an ad-hoc, mesh network, capable of device to device communication. You can share files and even send messages with the right application.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Slowly, network decentralization is pushing more and more functions out towards the edges. Communication becomes much more resilient. It can adapt to circumstances, if the networking is done by our own devices, rather than central phone towers or internet service providers...

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Is a revolution in economic thinking under way?

Is a revolution in economic thinking under way? | Networked Society | Scoop.it
Our current situation is conducive to revolutionary thinking, if not yet in politics, then maybe in economics.

 

The BoE has spent £50 billion over the past six months to support bond prices. That could instead have financed a cash handout of £830 for every man, woman and child in Britain, or £3,300 for a typical family of four. In the United States, the $40 billion the Fed has promised to transfer monthly, with no time limit, to banks and bond funds, could instead finance a monthly cash payment of $500 per family – to be continued indefinitely until full employment is restored.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

It seems that the trust in banks and the economists who back them is fast coming to an end. There is talk abut innovative solutions to the crisis, and one of those is to spend money not on bailing out banks or holding up bond prices (so the rich can continue to accumulate ever more money) but to actually help the people... what a novel idea! Well, actually not. It was proposed a century ago by some "rogue" economists but no one listened.

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oAnth - "offene Ablage: nothing to hide"'s curator insight, February 5, 2013 6:29 AM

// oAnth: What sounds on a first glance quite marvelous, needs in my opinion to consider who is paying here to whom by which kind of interests and conditions. The question, where these huge amounts of money are coming from, seems to be not even noteworthy.


The states' fiscal sovereignty is completely questioned. It's an open revolution not in economic thinking, but in the foundations of the state's authority. In so far this discussion continues the neoliberal agenda on a less hidden manner as a clear opening to the area of neofeudalism and proves an ongoing obvious power shift.

It has IMHO nothing to do with a P2P decentralized economy.

 

------------------------

 

// oAnth: I have to correct my latest entry in so far, as I have misunderstood the source of the money, which is to spend. If I understand well now, it would be a more or less indirect debt cut by spending money, created by the central bank, directly to the population, but - but I would instantly like to add, the incentive to the exploitation circle would nevertheless in a long run only be to tame by additional much higher top income taxes.

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Aaron Swartz in Guerrilla Open Access Manifesto asks: "Will you join us?"

Aaron Swartz in Guerrilla Open Access Manifesto asks: "Will you join us?" | Networked Society | Scoop.it

Information is power. But like all power, there are those who want to keep it for themselves. The world’s entire scientific and cultural heritage, published over centuries in books and journals, is increasingly being digitized and locked up by a handful of private corporations. Want to read the papers featuring the most famous results of the sciences? You’ll need to send enormous amounts to publishers like Reed Elsevier.

 

There are those struggling to change this. The Open Access Movement has fought valiantly to ensure that scientists do not sign their copyrights away but instead ensure their work is published on the Internet, under terms that allow anyone to access it. But even under the best scenarios, their work will only apply to things published in the future. Everything up until now will have been lost.

 

That is too high a price to pay. Forcing academics to pay money to read the work of their colleagues? Scanning entire libraries but only allowing the folks at Google to read them? Providing scientific articles to those at elite universities in the First World, but not to children in the Global South? It’s outrageous and unacceptable.

 

“I agree,” many say, “but what can we do? The companies hold the copyrights, they make enormous amounts of money by charging for access, and it’s perfectly legal — there’s nothing we can do to stop them.” But there is something we can, something that’s already being done: we can fight back.

 

Those with access to these resources — students, librarians, scientists — you have been given a privilege. You get to feed at this banquet of knowledge while the rest of the world is locked out. But you need not — indeed, morally, you cannot — keep this privilege for yourselves. You have a duty to share it with the world. And you have: trading passwords with colleagues, filling download requests for friends. 

 

Meanwhile, those who have been locked out are not standing idly by. You have been sneaking through holes and climbing over fences, liberating the information locked up by the publishers and sharing them with your friends. 

 

But all of this action goes on in the dark, hidden underground. It’s called stealing or piracy, as if sharing a wealth of knowledge were the moral equivalent of plundering a ship and murdering its crew. But sharing isn’t immoral — it’s a moral imperative. Only those blinded by greed would refuse to let a friend make a copy. 

 

Large corporations, of course, are blinded by greed. The laws under which they operate require it — their shareholders would revolt at anything less. And the politicians they have bought off back them, passing laws giving them the exclusive power to decide who can make copies. 

 

There is no justice in following unjust laws. It’s time to come into the light and, in the grand tradition of civil disobedience, declare our opposition to this private theft ofpublic culture.

 

We need to take information, wherever it is stored, make our copies and share them with the world. We need to take stuff that’s out of copyright and add it to the archive. We need to buy secret databases and put them on the Web. We need to download scientific journals and upload them to file sharing networks. We need to fight for Guerilla Open Access.

 

With enough of us, around the world, we’ll not just send a strong message opposing the privatization of knowledge — we’ll make it a thing of the past. Will you join us?

 Aaron SwartzJuly 2008, Eremo, Italy

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Found as part of a eulogy on Exit Strata's site, this manifesto of Aaron Swartz is almost 5 years old. It is too important to just become a footnote in the corporate dominance wars. Aaron calls on every one of us to participate, to join forces in liberating information that is being locked up behind ever tighter and ever more agressively defended paywalls. 

It is our cultural and scientific heritage that is being hijacked by nameless (and not so nameless) corporations. We are being reduced to "consumers" who are supposed to pay to even know what our friends and colleagues found and published.

 

It's time we listened to Aaron and that we ourselves started scanning and otherwise making copies of all those works that are within our reach ... and that we uploaded them to places where they can no longer be locked up.

 

Do you agree?

 

Then let's get going!

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Google awards grant to Sunlight Foundation to help improve government transparency

 

We're excited to share the news that Google.org just announced a $2.1 million grant for Sunlight to expand our mission to open government data.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

A welcome help for important work. We need more transparency in government.

 

"The Sunlight Foundation is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that uses the power of the Internet to catalyze greater government openness and transparency, and provides new tools and resources for media and citizens, alike."

 

Check out their introductory video here:

 

http://sunlightfoundation.com/about/

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Industry Consultants Warn Frackers: Do Not Underestimate the Global Anti-Fracking Movement

Industry Consultants Warn Frackers: Do Not Underestimate the Global Anti-Fracking Movement | Networked Society | Scoop.it

Oil and gas rigs are popping up in communities across the world as the fossil fuels industry races to exploit reserves with the controversial drilling technique known as fracking. In response, a global anti-fracking movement has emerged, and activists are winning victories in countries across world.

 

A report recently released by the international consulting group Control Risks warns the oil and gas industry that it has underestimated the "sophistication, reach and influence" of the global anti-fracking movement. The report contends the opposition is not simply a spotty, not-in-my-backyard phenomenon "masquerading as environmentalism," but a diverse and well-organized coalition that is unlikely to be swayed by the industry's well-funded public relation campaigns.

Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Fracking is a desperate attempt to force natural gas production and keep the fossil fuel business expanding, when, by rights, it should be contracting to leave space for renewable energies to fill. 

Chemicals and water are pressurized and injected into bore holes, to create cracks in rocky strata for natural gas to emerge and become recoverable. Some of those chemicals and dirt released by the technique end up in the groundwater contaminating in the water supply. 

 

Frack that - convert to solar...

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10 Practical Tools for Building a Resilient Local Economy

10 Practical Tools for Building a Resilient Local Economy | Networked Society | Scoop.it
The economy is changing. Dramatically. Coping with these changes means changing the way we do things. The path of the future involves root level, radical changes. Things we have always considered...
Sepp Hasslberger's insight:

Good ideas in this one, and timely. We are living in a time of change, and it's always good to be ready...

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