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The future of medicine and health
all that concerns the rapid evolution of medicine and health
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"Growing" medicines in plants requires new regulations - John Innes Centre (2013)

"Growing" medicines in plants requires new regulations - John Innes Centre (2013) | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it

Scientists say amending an EU directive on GMOs could help stimulate innovation in making cheaper vaccines, pharmaceuticals and organic plastics using plants. In a paper to be published in Current Pharmaceutical Design, six scientists from the US and Europe, including Dr Penny Sparrow from the John Innes Centre, compare risk assessment and regulation between the two continents... 

In the EU, plant-made pharmaceuticals have to be authorised in the same way as GM agricultural crops. In theory, agricultural crops can be grown by any farmer in the EU once approved. But for crops producing pharmaceuticals this would never actually happen. Drug companies would likely license farmers to grow these crops under controlled, defined and confined conditions... 

"Plant-made pharmaceuticals challenge two sets of existing EU regulations and to make progress in this area we need to make sure they are applied sensibly to allow pharmaceuticals to be produced in plants." Advantages of using plants to produce therapeutic proteins include the ability to produce large quantities quickly and cheaply, the absence of human pathogens, the stability of the proteins and the ease with which raw material can be stored as seed. This could be of huge benefit in developing countries where problems with storage can render vaccines useless... 

Just one farm growing 16,000 acres of safflower could meet the world's total demand for insulin. But potential cost savings are eliminated under current regulations, set up for GM agricultural crops not pharmaceuticals. The average cost for having GMOs approved in Europe is estimated at €7-10 million per event, compared to $1-2 million in the US. This helps keep Europe behind in exploiting the potential of these technologies...


Via Alexander J. Stein, sonia ramos
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sonia ramos's comment, February 22, 2013 4:08 AM
Totally agree
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Thimble Bioelectronics developing wearable pain relief patch

Thimble Bioelectronics developing wearable pain relief patch | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
The Thimble Bioelectronics TENS patch is a wearable pain relief gadget that manages and tracks pain.

 

Imagine if you could treat pain the same way you treat a cut: throw a bandage on it and let it heal. Thimble Bioelectronics is working on a patch based on Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) that's designed to provide this type of portable pain relief.

TENS is a type of treatment that uses low voltage electrical stimulation to alleviate certain types of pain. The treatment is typically performed via a small machine, but Thimble Bioelectronics is busy designing a wearable application of the technology designed to adhere to the problem area and provide TENS treatment for the pain. Details of the exact form the TENS patch will take haven't yet been revealed, but the company says it will include integrated Bluetooth connectivity that works with an accompanying smartphone app for pain tracking and management.

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Bendable Needles Developed to Deliver Stem-Cells into Brains: Scientific American

Bendable Needles Developed to Deliver Stem-Cells into Brains: Scientific American | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
The flexible needles could help doctors deliver stem cells to broader areas of the brain with fewer injections.

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As the surgical team prepared its instruments, a severed human head lay on the plastic tray, its face covered by a blue cloth. It had thawed over the past 24 hours, and a pinky-sized burr hole had been cut near the top of its skull. Scalp covered with salt-and-pepper stubble wrinkled above and below a pink strip of smooth bone.

Over the next two hours, the head would be scanned in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine as the researchers, led by Daniel Lim, a neurosurgeon and stem-cell scientist at the University of California, San Francisco, tested a flexible needle for delivering cells to the brain.

Several laboratories are investigating ways to treat neurological diseases by injecting cells into patients’ brains, and clinical trials are being conducted for Parkinson’s disease, stroke and other neurodegenerative diseases. These studies follow experiments showing dramatic improvements in rats and mice. But as work on potentially therapeutic cells has surged ahead, necessary surgical techniques have lagged behind, says Lim.

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US doctors cure child born with HIV-medical history made with first 'functional cure'

US doctors cure child born with HIV-medical history made with first 'functional cure' | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Medical history made with first 'functional cure' of unnamed two-year-old born with the virus but now needing no medication

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US doctors cure child born with HIV

Mississippi doctors make medical history made with first 'functional cure' of unnamed two-year-old born with the virus who now needs no medication

Doctors in the US have made medical history by effectively curing a child born with HIV, the first time such a case has been documented.

The infant, who is now two and a half, needs no medication for HIV, has a normal life expectancy and is highly unlikely to be infectious to others, doctors believe.

Though medical staff and scientists are unclear why the treatment was effective, the surprise success has raised hopes that the therapy might ultimately help doctors eradicate the virus among newborns.

Doctors did not release the name or sex of the child to protect the patient's identity, but said the infant was born, and lived, in Mississippi state. Details of the case were unveiled on Sunday at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Atlanta.

Dr Hannah Gay, who cared for the child at the University of Mississippi medical centre, told the Guardian the case amounted to the first "functional cure" of an HIV-infected child. A patient is functionally cured of HIV when standard tests are negative for the virus, but it is likely that a tiny amount remains in their body.

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Jessica onder's curator insight, March 5, 2013 8:34 AM

The article is very helpful with my research because it shows how medicine is still making incredible advances today and will continue because of the ever advancing technology.

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Mediterranean Diet Can Cut Heart Disease, Study Finds

Mediterranean Diet Can Cut Heart Disease, Study Finds | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Until now, evidence that the Mediterranean diet reduced the risk of heart disease was weak, and some experts had been skeptical that the effect of diet could be detected.

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About 30 percent of heart attacks, strokes and deaths from heart disease can be prevented in people at high risk if they switch to a Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil, nuts, beans, fish, fruits and vegetables, and even drink wine with meals, a large and rigorous new study has found.

The findings, published on The New England Journal of Medicine’s Web site on Monday, were based on the first major clinical trial to measure the diet’s effect on heart risks. The magnitude of the diet’s benefits startled experts. The study ended early, after almost five years, because the results were so clear it was considered unethical to continue.

The diet helped those following it even though they did not lose weight and most of them were already taking statins, or blood pressure or diabetes drugs to lower their heart disease risk.

“Really impressive,” said Rachel Johnson, a professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont and a spokeswoman for the American Heart Association. “And the really important thing — the coolest thing — is that they used very meaningful endpoints. They did not look at risk factors like cholesterol or hypertension or weight. They looked at heart attacks and strokes and death. At the end of the day, that is what really matters.”

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Scientists Use Distraction To Improve Memory In Older Adults

Scientists Use Distraction To Improve Memory In Older Adults | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Canadian scientists have found compelling evidence that older adults can eliminate forgetfulness and perform as well as younger adults on memory tests. The cognitive boost comes from a surprising source -- a distraction learning strategy.

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Scientists at Baycrest Health Sciences' Rotman Research Institute (RRI) and the University of Toronto's Psychology Department have found compelling evidence that older adults can eliminate forgetfulness and perform as well as younger adults on memory tests.

Scientists used a distraction learning strategy to help older adults overcome age-related forgetting and boost their performance to that of younger adults. Distraction learning sounds like an oxymoron, but a growing body of science is showing that older brains are adept at processing irrelevant and relevant information in the environment, without conscious effort, to aid memory performance.

"Older brains may be be doing something very adaptive with distraction to compensate for weakening memory," said Renée Biss, lead investigator and PhD student. "In our study we asked whether distraction can be used to foster memory-boosting rehearsal for older adults. The answer is yes!"

"To eliminate age-related forgetfulness across three consecutive memory experiments and help older adults perform like younger adults is dramatic and to our knowledge a totally unique finding," said Lynn Hasher, senior scientist on the study and a leading authority in attention and inhibitory functioning in younger and older adults. "Poor regulation of attention by older adults may actually have some benefits for memory."

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A Digital Shift on Health Data Swells Profits in an Industry

A Digital Shift on Health Data Swells Profits in an Industry | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
As doctors and hospitals struggle to make new records systems work, the winners are big companies that lobbied for the health records legislation that allowed their sales to soar.
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Sea bed to be mined for antibiotics-an £8m project to discover new antibiotics at the bottom of the ocean.

Sea bed to be mined for antibiotics-an £8m project to discover new antibiotics at the bottom of the ocean. | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Scientists are to hunt for new antibiotics at the bottom of the ocean in an £8m project led by experts at Aberdeen University.

Researchers are embarking on an £8m project to discover new antibiotics at the bottom of the ocean.

A team, led by scientists at Aberdeen University, is hunting for undiscovered chemicals among life that has evolved in deep sea trenches.

Prof Marcel Jaspars said the team hoped to find "the next generation" of infection-fighting drugs.

England's chief medical officer has warned of an "antibiotic apocalypse" with too few new drugs in the pipeline.

Few samples have ever been collected from ocean trenches - deep, narrow valleys in the sea floor which can plunge down to almost 6.8 miles (11km).

Yet researchers believe there is great potential for discovering antibiotics in these extreme conditions.

Life in these incredibly hostile environments is effectively cut off and has evolved differently in each trench.

The international team will use fishing vessels to drop sampling equipment on a reel of cables to the trench bed to collect sediment.

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Jessica onder's curator insight, March 5, 2013 8:40 AM

This article shows how antibiotics are still being discovered and how they will be better and more effective than the ones currently available.

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Injection-free vaccination |Delivering live vaccines without a refrigerator KurzweilAI

Injection-free vaccination |Delivering live vaccines without a refrigerator  KurzweilAI | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Scientists at King's have demonstrated the ability to deliver a dried live vaccine to the skin without a traditional needle (credit: King’s College

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Scientists at King’s College London have demonstrated the ability to deliver a dried live vaccine to the skin without a traditional needle, and shown for the first time that this technique is powerful enough to enable specialized immune cells in the skin to kick-start the immunizing properties of the vaccine.

Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, researchers say that although it is an early study, this important technical advance offers a potential solution to the challenges of delivering live vaccines in resource-limited countries globally, without the need for refrigeration.

A cheaper alternative to hypodermic needles, it would also remove safety risks from needle contamination and the pain-free administration could lead to more people taking up a vaccination. The researchers add that it could have an impact beyond infectious disease vaccination programs; for example, managing autoimmune and inflammatory conditions such as diabetes.

HIV, malaria and TB represent major global health challenges. Although promising research is underway to develop vaccines for these diseases, considerable stumbling blocks remain for countries where transporting and storing live vaccines in a continuously cold environment (around 2°C to 8°C or below) would not be possible. If a cold chain cannot be maintained for a live vaccine there is a high risk it could become unsafe and lose effectiveness.

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Jessica onder's curator insight, March 5, 2013 8:43 AM

This article greatly helps with my research because it demonstrates how vaccines are becoming more safe and how they may be more readily available to more of the world and how this new invention can have a positive impact with many other diseases too.

Jessica onder's comment, March 5, 2013 8:48 AM
This article explains that vaccinations are becoming easier to deploy, and also the major benefits of getting rid of the traditional needle. Some of these benefits include a lower risk of infection, lower risk of contamination, and a higher chance of more people going to receive their vaccinations.
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Genetically engineered virus kills liver cancer

Genetically engineered virus kills liver cancer | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
A genetically-engineered virus tested in 30 terminally-ill liver cancer patients significantly prolonged their lives, killing tumours and inhibiting the growth of new ones, scientists reported on Sunday.
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Cell scientists aim to rebuild hearts with reprogrammed tissue

Cell scientists aim to rebuild hearts with reprogrammed tissue | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Researchers in Oxford and California experiment with medical technology that could make transplants unnecessary

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Every two minutes someone in the UK has a heart attack. Every six minutes, someone dies from heart failure. During an attack, the heart remodels itself and dilates around the site of the injury to try to compensate, but these repairs are rarely effective. If the attack does not kill you, heart failure later frequently will.

"No matter what other clinical interventions are available, heart transplantation is the only genuine cure for this," says Paul Riley, professor of regenerative medicine at Oxford University. "The problem is there is a dearth of heart donors."

Transplants have their own problems – successful operations require patients to remain on toxic, immune-suppressing drugs for life and their subsequent life expectancies are not usually longer than 20 years.

The solution, emerging from the laboratories of several groups of scientists around the world, is to work out how to rebuild damaged hearts. Their weapons of choice are reprogrammed stem cells.

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The Age of Epigenetics by Timothy Spector - Project Syndicate

The Age of Epigenetics by Timothy Spector - Project Syndicate | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Fifty years after the discovery of DNA’s structure, genes remain crucial to understanding complex diseases.
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The Bounds of Cognition: Muller's "From Embodied and Extended ...

The Bounds of Cognition: Muller's "From Embodied and Extended ... | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Philosophy and psychology related to the hypothesis of extended cognition. Sunday, December 2, 2012. Muller's "From Embodied and Extended Mind to No Mind". In Cognitive Behavioral Systems.

Via Dorina Cadar
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The paper will discuss the extended mind thesis with a view to the notions of “agent” and of “mind”, while helping to clarify the relation between “embodiment” and the “extended mind”. I will suggest that the extended mind thesis constitutes a reductio ad absurdum of the notion of ‘mind’; the consequence of the extended mind debate should be to drop the notion of the mind altogether – rather than entering the discussion how extended it is.

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Early HIV drugs 'cure one in 10'

Early HIV drugs 'cure one in 10' | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Rapid drug treatment after HIV infection may be enough to "functionally cure" about one in 10 patients, say researchers in France.

 

They have been analysing 14 people who stopped therapy, but have since shown no signs of the virus resurging.

It follows reports of a baby girl being effectively cured after very early treatment in the US.

However, most people infected with HIV do not find out until the virus has fully infiltrated the body.

The group of patients, known as the Visconti cohort, all started treatment within 10 weeks of being infected. The patients were caught early as they turned up in hospital with other conditions and HIV was found in their blood.

They stuck to a course of antiretroviral drugs for three years, on average, but then stopped.

The drugs keep the virus only in check, they cannot eradicate it from its hiding places inside the immune system.

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The Hidden Costs of Cognitive Enhancement | Wired Science | Wired.com

The Hidden Costs of Cognitive Enhancement | Wired Science | Wired.com | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Gentle electrical zaps to the brain can accelerate learning and boost performance on a wide range of mental tasks, scientists have reported in recent years.

But a new study suggests there may be a hidden price: Gains in one aspect of cognition may come with deficits in another.

Researchers who study transcranial electrical stimulation, which uses electrodes placed on the scalp, see it as a potentially promising way to enhance cognition in neurological patients, struggling students, and perhaps even ordinary people. Scientists have used it to speed up rehab in people whose speech or movement has been affected by a stroke, and DARPA has studied it as a way to accelerate learning in intelligence analysts or soldiers on the lookout for bad guys and bombs.

Until now, the papers coming out of this field have reported one good-news finding after another.

“This is the first paper to my knowledge to show a cost associated with the gains in cognitive function,” said neuropsychologist Rex Jung of the University of New Mexico, who was not associated with the study. “It’s a really nice demonstration.”

Cognitive neuroscientist Roi Cohen Kadosh of the University of Oxford, who led the study, has been investigating brain stimulation to boost mathematical abilities. He has applied for a patent on a brain stimulator he hopes could help math-challenged students get a better grip on the basics, or even help the mathematically inclined perform even better.

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There is no doubt that cognitive enhancement is one of the hottest issues in the coming future and should be getting much more attention.

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Study maps human metabolism in health and disease | Science Codex

Study maps human metabolism in health and disease | Science Codex | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Scientists have produced an instruction manual for the human genome that provides a framework to better understand the relationship between an individual's genetic make-up and their lifestyle.

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The international team of researchers say their study – published in Nature Biotechnology – provides the best model yet to explain why individuals react differently to environmental factors such as diet or medication.

 

"This research is the second important stage of our understanding of the human genome," said study author Professor Pedro Mendes, from The University of Manchester's School of Computer Science. "If the sequencing of the human genome provided us with a list of the biological parts then our study explains how these parts operate within different individuals.

 

"The results provide a framework that will lead to a better understanding of how an individual's lifestyle, such as diet, or a particular drug they may require is likely to affect them according to their specific genetic characteristics. The model takes us an important step closer to what is termed 'personalised medicine', where treatments are tailored according to the patient's genetic information."

 

The research, which involved scientists from Manchester, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Reykjavik, San Diego, Berlin and others, mapped 65 different human cell types and half of the 2,600 enzymes that are known drug targets in order to produce the network model.

 

Co-author Douglas Kell, Chief Executive of Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and Professor of Bioanalytical Science at the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, said: "To understand the behaviour of a system one must have a model of it. By converting our biological knowledge into a mathematical model format, this work provides a freely accessible tool that will offer an in-depth understanding of human metabolism and its key role in many major human diseases.

 

"This study offers the most complete model of the human metabolic network available to date to help analyse and test predictions about the physiological and biochemical properties of human cells."

 

Dr Nicolas Le Novère, from the Babraham Institute in Cambridge (UK), said: "This is a model that links the smallest molecular scale to the full cellular level. It contains more than 8,000 molecular species and 7,000 chemical reactions – no single researcher could have built this alone. Having large collaborations like these, using open standards and data-sharing resources, is crucial for systems biology."

Source: University of Manchester
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This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com

This Electronic Temporary Tattoo Will Soon Be Tracking Your Health | Wired Design | Wired.com | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
This stick-on silicon electrode network is wearable technology to the extreme, designed as a non-invasive diagnostic sensor.

 

FitBit too bulky? Why not glue a sensor array to your skin?

The quantified self goes nanoscale with a stick-on silicon electrode network that could not only change the way we measure health metrics, but could enable a new form of user interface. And the researchers behind it aim to have the device available in the next few weeks through a spinoff company, MC10.

The development takes wearable technology to the extreme, designed as a non-invasive diagnostic sensor that could be used to measure hydration, activity, and even infant temperature. It bonds to the skin, somewhat like a temporary tattoo, flexing and bending in sync with your skin the way you wish a Band-Aid would. How? Researchers at the University of Illinois, Dalian University of Technology in China, and the University of California at San Diego made it really, really small.

With a thickness of 0.8 micrometers at the widest — around one-thousandth the diameter of a human hair — the thin mesh of silicon actually nestles in to the grooves and creases in your skin, even the ones too small to see. Being small helps, but it’s also important that the silicon is laid out in a serpentine pattern and bonded to a soft rubber substrate, allowing the stiff material to flex, a little bit like an accordion.

“Although electronics, over the years, has developed into an extremely sophisticated form of technology, all existing commercial devices in electronics involve silicon wafers as the supporting substrate,” says John Rogers, who led the study published this week in Advanced Materials.

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Matthew Booth's curator insight, March 22, 2013 8:31 AM

This article shows the miniaturisation of the medical world, while we still see big bulky machines in hospitals, one day everything might be as small and as unnoticeable. The photos and information show just how tiny this is and will be good to show in the essay, how this technology can be nano.

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Injectable gel repairs damage after heart attack in pigs : Spoonful of Medicine

Injectable gel repairs damage after heart attack in pigs : Spoonful of Medicine | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
As you read this sentence, on average at least one person in the US will have started to clutch her chest.

The blood flow to her heart will become blocked and cardiac muscle cells will start to die off and get replaced with scar tissue. This person has just suffered a heart attack and most likely will go on to develop heart failure, a weakening of the heart’s ability to pump blood and oxygen. In five years time, there’s a 50/50 chance she’ll be dead.

There are currently no treatments that can repair the damage associated with this so-called ‘myocardial infarction’ (MI), but a potential solution is now showing promise in a large-animal model. Reporting today in Science Translational Medicine, a team of bioengineers at the University of California–San Diego (UCSD) has developed a protein-rich gel that appears to help repair cardiac muscle in a pig model of MI.

The researchers delivered the hydrogel via a catheter directly into the damaged regions of the porcine heart, and showed that the product promoted cellular regeneration and improved cardiac function after a heart attack. Compared to placebo-treated animals, the pigs that received a hydrogel injection displayed a 30% increase in heart volume, a 20% improvement in heart wall movement and a 10% reduction in the amount of scar tissue scar three months out from their heart attacks. “We hope this will be a game-changing technology that can actually prevent heart failure after heart attack,” says UCSD’s Karen Christman, who led the study.

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Jessica onder's curator insight, March 5, 2013 8:37 AM

This article is helpful to my research because it shows how cardiac medicine is continuing to develop and how advances are being made to help victims of heart attacks and maybe another heart diseases that cause tissue death within the heart

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Robots Taking Record Number of Human Uteri

Robots Taking Record Number of Human Uteri | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Robot-assisted hysterectomy became 20 times more common between 2007 and 2010.

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Use of robotic assistance devices that let surgeons sit remotely and perform surgeries via a 3-D monitor and a series of joysticks and buttons was approved by the FDA in 2005. 

Since then -- despite costing more than $1 million to purchase -- assimilation of these machines into operating rooms has been rapid. Especially by the standards of often slow-to-adapt U.S. health care systems. 

Of 264,758 people who underwent hysterectomy for benign reasons in the U.S. between 2007 and 2010, the number of surgeons invoking robotic assistance increased from 0.5% in 2007 to 9.5% in 2010, according to new data today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

But since 2005 we've had little data on whether these robots were actually improving care and/or saving money. Which makes it especially interesting that so many for-profit hospitals did decide to invest in them.

While the process looks extremely impressive/progressive and leaves smaller scars than having an open surgery, the robotic surgeries actually don't seem to be appreciably better in terms of complications or outcomes, according to the JAMA study. They also end up costing a lot more. A robot-assisted hysterectomy costs, on average, $8,854, where traditional open and laparoscopic hysterectomies average $6,712 and $6,671, respectively.

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Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors

Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Two Indiana University researchers have developed a computer model they say can identify significantly better and less-expensive treatments than can doctors acting alone.
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Matthew Booth's curator insight, March 22, 2013 8:11 AM

This article talks how an AI computer has given more frequently accurate diagnoses than doctors and how it is also more cost effective. This source gives good statistics and will be useful showing how AI might be seen more of in the future for medicine.

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Medicine for the Rich Is About to Get Cheap Enough for Regular People | Wired Business | Wired.com

Medicine for the Rich Is About to Get Cheap Enough for Regular People | Wired Business | Wired.com | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it

It’s a pattern we keep seeing repeated across the tech landscape in PCs, displays and cell phones. Hardware prices drop to commodity levels, and the action and the value all migrates to software-

After years of exotic and very expensive machines sequencing DNA, the genomics industry finally looks poised for its cell phone moment.

Soon, the business of genetics could look a lot like the commodity-driven mobile industry, with providers selling hardware on the cheap and relying on software, apps and diagnostics to drive revenue. And, as with the app-filled smartphones we keep close to us 24/7, genomics could finally become a much more intimate part of our lives.

“With smartphones it’s the data and apps where the high value has accrued over time. In the case of sequencing, it’s going to be something similar,” said Jorge Conde, CFO and co-founder of Knome, a genomic diagnostics company. The question, he says, then becomes whether the market looks like Apple’s walled garden, Microsoft’s more democratic model, or Google, where everything happens in the cloud.

In recent years, the industry has been working to solve the data storage and analysis bottlenecks resulting from an explosion of genetic data as sequencing costs have continued to drop. And they have succeeded. That means companies and institutions can finally focus on deciphering what all our genetic data actually means and how it might influence our risk for certain diseases. In other words, diagnostics is where the money is moving.

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A massage pill?

A massage pill? | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Humans aren't the only animals that enjoy being gently massaged. Many other mammals, from rats to cats, like to be groomed and softly stroked. A recent…
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Injectable Foam Blocks Internal Bleeding on the Battlefield: Scientific American

Injectable Foam Blocks Internal Bleeding on the Battlefield: Scientific American | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Field medics want to use a novel foam to seal off hemorrhaging organs, but safety concerns persist

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Despite their best efforts to stabilize abdominal wounds sustained on the battlefield, military first-responders have few options when it comes to stanching internal bleeding caused by, for example, gunshots or explosive fragments. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) says it is studying a new type of injectable foam that molds to organs and slows hemorrhaging. This could provide field medics with a way to buy more time for soldiers en route to medical treatment facilities.

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Matthew Booth's curator insight, March 22, 2013 8:06 AM

This article talks about one of the advancements for the military. It describes foam that they want to use to temporarily stop haemorrhaging while they can get to a medical centre. This source will be useful to show that how medical advancements can save lives in the military. 

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Search of DNA Sequences Reveals Full Identities

Search of DNA Sequences Reveals Full Identities | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
Surprising results from a DNA researcher highlight the growing tension between the advancement of medical research and privacy concerns.

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The genetic data posted online seemed perfectly anonymous — strings of billions of DNA letters from more than 1,000 people. But all it took was some clever sleuthing on the Web for a geneticsresearcher to identify five people he randomly selected from the study group. Not only that, he found their entire families, even though the relatives had no part in the study — identifying nearly 50 people.

The researcher did not reveal the names of the people he found, but the exercise, published Thursday in the journal Science, illustrates the difficulty of protecting the privacy of volunteers involved in medical research when the genetic information they provide needs to be public so scientists can use it.

Other reports have identified people whose genetic data was online, but none had done so using such limited information: the long strings of DNA letters, an age and, because the study focused on only American subjects, a state.

“I’ve been worried about this for a long time,” said Barbara Koenig, a researcher at the University of California in San Francisco who studies issues involving genetic data. “We always should be operating on the assumption that this is possible.”

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Cynthia Hack's curator insight, March 3, 2013 12:28 PM

star trek here we come

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The Official Launch of PREPARE: an Easy-to-Use, Online Advance Care Planning Tool | GeriPal - Geriatrics and Palliative Care Blog

The Official Launch of PREPARE: an Easy-to-Use, Online Advance Care Planning Tool | GeriPal - Geriatrics and Palliative Care Blog | The future of medicine and health | Scoop.it
HOW can people prepare to have the conversation about what matters most in life and HOW can they prepare for medical decision making? A new, interactive, easy-to-use, advance care planning website called PREPARE can help.
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