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Miami-Dade officer takes first steps as a 'bionic man' after being struck by drunk driver (VIDEO)

Miami-Dade officer takes first steps as a 'bionic man' after being struck by drunk driver (VIDEO) | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it

MIAMI (WSVN) -- A Miami Police officer has become a "walking miracle" thanks to a new advancement in technology.

 

Senior Miami-Dade Police officer Leo Fernandez is getting a chance to live a normal a life by becoming the first amputee in South Florida to receive a robotic foot.


Fernandez lost part of his leg in 2002 when he was hit by a drunk driver during a routine traffic stop on the Palmetto Expressway.

 

It took three long years of rehab before Fernandez was able to go back to work on the police force. He said life became a struggle both mentally and physically. "The worst is really dealing with the loss of the leg. You want to be able to do everything like a normal person. That's what triggers the depression."

 

Fernandez said the old prosthesis was extremely hard on his body and put too much pressure on his back and knees. Those problems have ended after receiving the new robotic foot called Biom. "It's actually got batteries and a computer brain inside of it," Fernandez said. "What it does is it pushes off the ground like your muscles would do normally..."

 

(click pic to watch video)


Via Billy Corben
Daniel Poruban's insight:

A reliable article from a reliable news source from the USA.

 

I thought this article was relevant as it shows how technology is not only advancing the Police Force into a new stage, but also giving officers who have suffered the loss of limbs a second chance at their career as a Police Officer. This technology is at its early stages, however it could be improved an not only provide an alternative for an actual limb, but make the rooting one even more advanced allowing for the completion of tasks which would otherwise not have been possible.

 

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The Future of Law Enforcement Technology
1012 ICT Part A, Annotated Bibliography Assignment. Topic: Law Enforcement
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NYPD Commissioner says department will begin testing  a new high-tech device that scans for concealed weapons 

NYPD Commissioner says department will begin testing  a new high-tech device that scans for concealed weapons  | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it
The NYPD will soon deploy new technology allowing police to detect guns carried by criminals without using the typical pat-down procedure, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said Wednesday.

Via littlebytesnews
Daniel Poruban's insight:

Acceptable article from a reliable source that provides an acceptable amount of information about the topic with quotes and some sources.

 

A new technology in it's early stages which allows officers to scan for concealed weapons, however this is done by using a type of radiation in the form of a beam, which reflects of the body of a person and feedback different colours for anything that is other than the person's body. As radiation is involved, I believe that there could be some health risks involved with this type of technology which would need some serious testing in order to ensure everyone's safety whilst in operation. Great idea though.

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Miami-Dade officer takes first steps as a 'bionic man' after being struck by drunk driver (VIDEO)

Miami-Dade officer takes first steps as a 'bionic man' after being struck by drunk driver (VIDEO) | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it

MIAMI (WSVN) -- A Miami Police officer has become a "walking miracle" thanks to a new advancement in technology.

 

Senior Miami-Dade Police officer Leo Fernandez is getting a chance to live a normal a life by becoming the first amputee in South Florida to receive a robotic foot.


Fernandez lost part of his leg in 2002 when he was hit by a drunk driver during a routine traffic stop on the Palmetto Expressway.

 

It took three long years of rehab before Fernandez was able to go back to work on the police force. He said life became a struggle both mentally and physically. "The worst is really dealing with the loss of the leg. You want to be able to do everything like a normal person. That's what triggers the depression."

 

Fernandez said the old prosthesis was extremely hard on his body and put too much pressure on his back and knees. Those problems have ended after receiving the new robotic foot called Biom. "It's actually got batteries and a computer brain inside of it," Fernandez said. "What it does is it pushes off the ground like your muscles would do normally..."

 

(click pic to watch video)


Via Billy Corben
Daniel Poruban's insight:

A reliable article from a reliable news source from the USA.

 

I thought this article was relevant as it shows how technology is not only advancing the Police Force into a new stage, but also giving officers who have suffered the loss of limbs a second chance at their career as a Police Officer. This technology is at its early stages, however it could be improved an not only provide an alternative for an actual limb, but make the rooting one even more advanced allowing for the completion of tasks which would otherwise not have been possible.

 

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Robotic exoskeletons for law enforcement

Robotic exoskeletons for law enforcement | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it
The movie RoboCop was 26 years ago, long enough that there is a remake due out in 2014. For all its over-the-top moments (my personal favorite is where the bad guy’s face gets dissolved

 

Maybe that’s why so many people are upset about the use of drone aircraft.

We won’t be recycling all-but-dead cops into cyborgs anytime soon, but there is some robot-like research ongoing that could someday make it into the law enforcement sector.

 

Instead of robots, this initiative is concerned with exoskeletons. In biology, an exoskeleton is a rigid shell that serves the same function as bones in higher creatures, at the same time protecting all the gooey stuff inside. They’re mostly limited to insects and crustaceans. With people, an exoskeleton is a kind of motorized brace that augments the wearer’s capabilities. Wearing an exoskeleton, you might be able to run as fast as a car could drive, or lift ten times your own weight.

 

The prime movers behind exoskeleton research presently are people from NASA and the nuclear energy industry. The near-meltdown of the nuclear power plant at Fukushima caused the entire industry, and the Japanese in particular, to reconsider their capabilities for working inside radioactive containment vessels. People can’t stay in there for long, and sometimes not at all, because of radiation.

Daniel Poruban's insight:

Great information from a good source, It is also quite recent.

 

The idea of having an Exoskeleton for humans has been around for a long time, but only just recently has it actually officially been recognised by organisations such as the Army and the Police Force. If the technology continues its development at the pace it is at now, it would be very interesting to see what could be accomplished in 5 - 10 years from now, as I believe that this could have a very significant impact of our everyday lives, not just for the Police Force but for society as well. This technology has the potential for bad however if it were to get into the wrong hands.

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Pre-Cog Is Real – New Software Stops Crime Before It Happens

Pre-Cog Is Real – New Software Stops Crime Before It Happens | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it
In July the Santa Cruz Police Department began experimenting with an interesting bit of software developed by scientists at Santa Clara University. The researchers behind the software are like an intellectual “Oceans Eleven” team of specialists: two mathematicians, an anthropologist and a criminologist. They’ve combined their cerebral forces to come up with a mathematical modelthat takes crime data from the past to forecast crimes in the future. The basic math is similar to that used by seismologists to predict aftershocks following an earthquake (also a handy bit of software in southern California).

 

Large earthquakes are unpredictable, but the aftershocks that follow are not and their occurrence can be predicted with mathematical models. It occurred to Dr. George Mohler, one of the Santa Clara mathematicians, that criminal activity might not be random and that, similar to aftershocks, some crimes might be predicted by other crimes that precede them. The reasoning is based on the assumption that crimes are clustered – it’s what police call ‘hotspots.’ Burglaries will occur in the same area and at the same houses because the vulnerabilities of that area will be known to the burglars. Gang violence is also clustered. A gang shooting will often trigger retaliatory shootings.

Daniel Poruban's insight:

Reliable source with valuable and detailed information, however published in 2011.

 

This Technology is in it's very early stages as it is a very complicated one. It hopes to provide a system that has the ability to predict crimes before they happen. This seems like a great idea but requires a great amount of information to be gathered along with lots of testing and programming therefore with it's complexity creating a high chance of running into problems not just along the way but in the final product itself if it were to be completed. This will take many years before it can officially be implemented and 100% trusted.

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C.R.A.B. Robot: The Future of Law Enforcement

C.R.A.B. Robot: The Future of Law Enforcement | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it

If you remember the cult film Robocop, you'll remember the big rogue robotic police bots that killed everything they came across. The photo above might look similar to one of those, but it is in fact a 3D-creation by award-winning designer Jamie Martin, whose website gives some incredible insights into the vision of the man and his awesome talent for innovation.

Read more at http://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/news-crab-robots-future-law-enforcement#zAYKfAHzxYlTzevI.99

Daniel Poruban's insight:

Not too sure about the reliability of the website, however recent and relevant.

 

This seems like an idea that is in it's early stages of planning which could take many years before having a completed fully functional prototype with all of the features listed in the video provided. However such a creation could assist the Police Force greatly as it could minimise human fatalities and provide a greater amount of security on the streets for the public.

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US researchers developing smart cameras for predictive surveillance

US researchers developing smart cameras for predictive surveillance | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it
In a project backed by the government, two university staffers are working to create automated cameras that interpret and predict without human help.
Daniel Poruban's insight:

Reliable source, fairly recent and detailed.

 

The name of this technology does not suggest how complicated it really is to create. However with the current rate of technological advancement, it is very probable that this could be accomplished in the not too distant future. This is another piece of technology that would have a massive impact on society not just by providing a significantly greater amount of safety, but also introducing a type of artificial intelligence.

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Temporal video filtering makes CSI-style enhancement possible

Temporal video filtering makes CSI-style enhancement possible | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it
You've seen this in crime dramas: hard bitten detective employs computer genius with attitude to conjure vital clues from grainy and low-resolution surveillance video by using some unspecified form of "enhancement." Scoff all you like, but MIT...
Daniel Poruban's insight:

Acceptable source, article is recent with acceptable amount of detail.

 

A technology that could be further developed into something big. It is capable of reproducing pixels which would otherwise be blurry when zoomed in to provide a clear picture of the zoomed in image. This is essential for the Police for recognising criminals when cameras are at a distance from the event taking place. Has a big future in my opinion.

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Laser scanning technology will produce 3D pictures of crash sites

Laser scanning technology will produce 3D pictures of crash sites | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it
Laser scanning technology which allows police to produce 3D images of motorway crash sites is to be rolled out in Kent.

Interesting to watch how 3D is getting more and more in to our daily live. @safegaard


Via Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist
Daniel Poruban's insight:

Informative article about the topic, however it was published in the year 2011 thus making the information less accurate to the current year.

 

This technology does not sound like anything special, however I believe that it is indeed something that could save a great amount of time and money for the police force in their investigations to finding exactly what occurs at each accident.

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Open Eye Communications » Blog Archive » The future of police technology

Open Eye Communications » Blog Archive » The future of police technology | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it

Forces are clearly moving to technology that enables the service deliverer to be a self sufficient, productive person, operating remotely without massive organisational support. However, there is a recognition that efforts also need to focus on technology that enables and derives benefits from greater customer self service.

 

Industry views, not surprisingly, were supportive of quicker procurement and highlighted the traditionally high barriers to entry into the police ICT market. They made a plea for early involvement in the specification of procurements, arguing that their experience and involvement helps define a real world view of what’s possible. They stressed the essential need for common standards and interoperability across forces and argued that some form of mandation is both desirable and necessary.

Daniel Poruban's insight:

Although the article was published in 2012, the information is still relevant to today. Seems like a reliable source.

 

This is a very interesting article as it goes into detail about how the Police Force is going through major changes as more technology comes out at a rapid pace. The Police Force is slowly becoming more reliant on technology thus needing great changes in their systems from changing their laws to providing additional education to officers on how to use these technology equipment.

 

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Nanotechnology and Surveillance

Nanotechnology and Surveillance | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it

Nanotechnology will eventually enable supercomputing on a very small scale, detection of minute amounts of substances, rapid analysis of genomes, and implantation of microchips into humans. These technologies will be highly beneficial in promoting economic progress, health, and environmental preservation. But these technologies may also come with a darker side: they can open new opportunities for governments, individuals, and private interests to violate privacy. How nanotechnology will affect our privacy, and what actions governments should take, are important issues that need to be resolved before nano-surveillance becomes ubiquitous and its control difficult. Without careful consideration, thought, and possibly new policy action, "Big Brother" may end up being very, very small.

 

Nanotechnologies can assist surveillance in many ways. An obvious tool for nanotechnological surveillance is nano-sensors. These sensors, already under development, can detect minute amounts of chemicals in the air. For example, Owlstone Nanotech, a New York-based company, is expected to produce dime-sized wireless sensors that can detect toxins and explosive materials in the air by 2007.1 It should not be long until nano-sensors are much smaller. Another possible nano-surveillance innovation might be extremely small cameras. Researchers at Hiroshima University and Nippon Hoso Kyokai have reportedly already been able to find a silicon nanocrystal film that is photoconductive, which is the first step in creating highly miniaturized cameras.2 Human implanted microchips may also become a tool of surveillance, since they could be used to track an indivdual’s location and possibly what that person consumed (drugs, junk food)

Daniel Poruban's insight:

Very informative, however no publish date and even though the information is referenced, the sources are quite outdated.

 

As mentioned, even though the article may be a little outdated, the topic is extremely interesting as it talks about nanotechnology being implemented into our everyday lives, from computers becoming even faster than they already are and therefore being able to complete tasks fast, thus helping in Police investigations, to chips being implanted into humans for tracking and other monitoring purposes. Although I do not agree with the implanting of chips into humans, it would be interesting to see where this technology could end up in a couple of years time.

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GPS Tracking Dart Used in High-Pursuit Car Chases | Live View GPS Tracking Blog

GPS Tracking Dart Used in High-Pursuit Car Chases | Live View GPS Tracking Blog | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it

Police departments in the US utilize advanced GPS tracking “darts” in high-speed chases. Most people are no stranger to the high-speed car chases inarious locations throughout the US. These high-pursuit car chases are often extremely dangerous to pedestrians, other vehicles, and the police involved in the chase. Many chases involve injuries or death of innocent bystanders. For all of these reasons, there’s an increased need for alternative methods to circumvent these dangerous car chases; and GPS tracking technology is one such alternative.

 

Not unlike the futurist gadgets used in the James Bond movies, a GPS tracking dart is being tested by the Los Angeles and Austin police departments, to name a few, where a good majority of high-speed chases happen. The tracking dart is shot via a gun-like device onto the suspect’s vehicle, not so dissimilar as to shooting a bullet out of a gun. The police officer has a laser pointer equipped compressed air-launcher that helps him aim the dart so it can be targeted on a “good spot” (where it will stick and remain intact) on the vehicle where it will stick and remain intact.

Daniel Poruban's insight:

Official product website thus making the information reliable, also fair recent.

 

Although this technology has already been invented it, is still in it's testing phase and I believe that this is another invention that has the potential to have a significant impact on Police chases as this would allow for risk free tracking of a suspect thus creating less chances for injuries or fatalities.

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Mind-Reading Helmet To Reveal Your Crimes : DNews

Mind-Reading Helmet To Reveal Your Crimes : DNews | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it
Will military police shoot mind bullets at criminals with thought crimes?

 

"Remember when 'thoughtcrimes' were just little spoonfuls of spooky fiction George Owell whipped up? Well, my friends, get ready to dust off your dystopia because 'thoughtcrimes' are about to leap off the pages of "1984" and into your head"

Daniel Poruban's insight:

Great source, great information and fairly recent thus relevant.

 

The current lie detectors are becoming absolete as criminals are able to cheat the system quite easily and therefore making it unreliable. This new technology however combines science with technology making a device that detects specific sparks in nerves and brain waves with advanced precision making it impossible to cheat and therefore creating an accurate way to force criminals into telling the truth.

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A Future of Drones – Is the Effort to Limit Police Use Hopeless? | Top Secret Writers

A Future of Drones – Is the Effort to Limit Police Use Hopeless? | Top Secret Writers | The Future of Law Enforcement Technology | Scoop.it

Life is imitating art with the advent of drones. Until recently, drones were only seen as science fiction depicted in the popular syfy show SG-1, where drones are used by advanced alien cultures, the evil Goa’ulds.

The general public first learned about drones when the computer operated unmanned planes were used as spy weapons and later to target terrorists in Afghanistan in missile strikes. Drone strikes are now a common occurrence that many people accept as the cost of war.

It’s not unusual that military weapons and techniques trickle down to the public and it was only a matter of time before the lure of drones snagged police forces.

Financially strapped law enforcement leaders are always looking for more effective ways to fight crime. The drone may be a solution for many police and sheriff departments as the economy continues to tank, budgets are cut deeper and the threat of crime continues to rise.

 

 How Can Drones Help Police?

Keeping officers out of life-threatening situations and saving the cost of operating a helicopter are just a couple of the many attractions a drone has for modern police departments. Drone capabilities include video recording, tracking criminals and others via heat detection systems that map out heat signature, and even finding those unfortunate enough to get lost in the woods. (1)

 

All of these features make a drone highly desirable for over-worked, under-staffed and under-financed law enforcement officers. So why is there a rush by many lawmakers to draft new laws to stipulate how and when drones can be used by the eager police? Why would anyone deny the police complete use of such advance technology?

That’s simple – the risk of abuse.

 

All across America, small towns and state officials are taking a harder look at how drones can and should be used against their own citizens. The biggest danger to personal liberties and freedom is the development of a police state mentality that eagerly embraces government surveillance. Many of those in favor of police drones cite that the public is already under surveillance via street and building cams.

 

Some people fear the power and control police gain by using drones is just too great and opens the door to a temptation of abuse. Many believe that it would become normal for police to monitor the actions of any private citizen they suspected of a crime or even for something as trivial as demonstrating opposing political ideologies.

 

Daniel Poruban's insight:

Acceptable source with great relevancy. No publish date, but article mentions events in 2012 thus making it recent.

 

An article about the current development of drones and how they will advance and effect our lives in the future along with greatly assisting the Police. Drones have a huge future in my personal opinion as the technology is not too complicated but has the potential to add other technologies onto them which could provide various types of improvements in reducing the crime rate around the world.

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