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The Future of Content
How will content be paid for in the future; I pay, you pay, they pay? Copy economy vs access ecocomy? Freemium? Feels Like Free?
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Will Netflix, YouTube, Hulu Content Create a 'Second Revolution' in Television?

Will Netflix, YouTube, Hulu Content Create a 'Second Revolution' in Television? | The Future of Content | Scoop.it
Streaming companies are moving full-bore into original content as studios raise the rent on their programming...

 

Forget broadcasting. Streaming services like Netflix think the next money to be made is in narrowcasting, a strategy that both mimics and challenges the television business model.

For those services, it may be just in time. On Tuesday, Netflix stock took a dive despite a profitable performance because of investor worries over the rising cost of licensing content. Following the model of premium cable like HBO and Showtime, Netflix and other streaming companies are instead drilling deeper into the market by making their own premium shows with A-list stars like Kevin Spacey and directors like David Fincher and Eli Roth.

 

Netflix is in the middle of "the evolution of being perceived as a distributor to being a programmer," Ted Sarandos, Netflix's chief content officer, said earlier this month at TheWrap's annual media conference, TheGrill.

As more televisions are connected to the internet, barriers between the web and television are collapsing. Though the enthusiasm of viewers is not yet proven, that will potentially allow the likes of Hulu and Amazon to exponentially broaden their reach. Already, streaming companies have staked out a foothold in the new frontier:

 

>> Netflix, which first lured viewers with classic movies and kids' television, will air six original shows next year, including the David Fincher political thriller "House of Cards" and new seasons of "Arrested Development." The budgets (reported to be $100 million for "House of Cards) are big and so are the expectations.

>> Amazon has continued to develop Amazon Studios, which options scripts and is developing films via crowd-sourcing. It's announced more than a dozen projects in development, among them a zombie film involving Clive Barker and an adaptation of the self-published novel "Seed." 

>> Hulu is flirting with its own in-house lineup, with series like the campaign dramedy "Battleground" and a talk show featuring Larry King.

>> YouTube has invested $100 million in original programming, with more money on the way. Nearly a year after it first announced an ambitious channels initiative, YouTube announced last week that it was doubling-down on its investment and backing new channels from the likes of Russell Simmons and Adam Carolla.

   

These digital companies are overhauling the way that consumers watch shows and broadening the definition of filmed entertainment. At the start of every season, Netflix releases all of a show's episodes simultaneously. The move is a nod to the binge habits of its members, Netflix says, who prefer to see an entire season in a few sittings as opposed to tuning in for the latest episode at a particular time every week.

It's also an acknowledgement to the longevity of shows on Netflix or Hulu,  where viewers can watch them for years to come. That allows the companies to take long-term risks that a primetime-based network cannot.

 

YouTube's experiment may be even more radical.

 

Instead of the broad hits that keep the lights on at traditional networks, the company wants to create scores of channels that appeal to specific niches -- from cooking to music to comedy.

"Let's be clear, Google is trying to do nothing less than to effect a second revolution in broadcasting, that is no less significant than when we moved from rabbit ears and four channels  to pay TV,"  said Dan Cryan, director of digital media at IHS Screen Digest. "YouTube is in the process of fostering 1,000 niches in order to change the balance of the television economy again."

For the streaming companies, the move into original content is as much to do with economics. Currently, major studios are hiking licensing fees or shunning many exclusive contracts.

 

"It's a classic television network move," Cryan told TheWrap. "It's what dragged MTV from music videos to 'Jersey Shore' and HBO from having exclusive windows on movies to making 'Game of Thrones.' It is a tried and tested technique that is driven by a need to establish identity and to have control over their destiny by not being reliant on others for content."

Gone are the days when Netflix cast the only shadow across the streaming landscape, enabling it to secure the rights to old movies for relative pennies and license content no one else had.

This new competition is forcing companies to get creative -- fast. Netflix's stock plunged 15 percent in after-hours trading Tuesday after its third-quarter earnings report disappointed. Even though Netflix's subscription number have grown to more than 25 million, far more than say the roughly 2 million who subscribe to Hulu Plus, those numbers are not growing fast enough to keep up with rising licensing fees.

“Content owners are just raising the rent, and Netflix can’t keep paying,” James McQuivey, an analyst with Forrester Research, told TheWrap. “Studios are looking at these digital providers like Hulu, Amazon, Netflix and Apple as: ‘If this is where the market needs to go, I need to charge them a lot more.’”

Increasingly, Netflix has seen content providers walk away or alter the terms of their deals.

 

Epix, which owns the digital rights to movies from Paramount, Lionsgate and MGM, signed a deal with Amazon in September, ending its exclusive agreement with Netflix. Later that month, Netflix decided to dial down the number of shows it hosts from A&E and History.

“The decision to do Netflix exclusively was because they were really the only game in town at that point in time,” Epix CEO Mark Greenberg told TheWrap. “We live in a capitalistic society and are here to generate profit for our owners. We are doing that by trying to help reach a larger consumer base, hence the decision to go to Amazon.”

Nor is this kind of disagreement over the value of content unique to Netflix. Variety reported in August that News Corp, which airs Fox, Comcast (NBC) and Disney (ABC) were considering ending their current relationship with Hulu, putting in jeopardy Hulu's advantage over competitors -- exclusive rights to stream ongoing TV shows.

 

 

 

But with new players entering the space, the thirst for exclusive content has never been more intense, analysts say. That's where Amazon and the Google-owned YouTube, with their ability to write massive checks, may have a big advantage.

"Amazon lost millions when it built its Kindle business because it wanted to be the dominant book seller," Edward Jay Epstein, author of "The Hollywood Economist: The Hidden Financial Reality Behind the Movies," told TheWrap. "Can Netflix stand to lose millions? Where will those millions come from?"

For its part, Netflix insists that even the biggest companies have a limited tolerance for losing money.

That may be true, but the old way of luring customers won't last much longer. It is not enough to offer a library of older movies and shows; those options are available across nearly all of the major streaming services.

This has put the distributors in a tough position. Do they go the way of cable providers, who all offer the same content and lure customers with their service and package benefits? Or do they take the path pioneered by cable channels like HBO and Showtime and offer exclusive content – movies they license and original programming they create?

 

The answer, particularly for Netflix and Hulu, seems to be the second option. Many analysts see this thirst for original programming as a way of battling back against the networks for the rising fees, demonstrating their ability to create content.

“They are doing that to mess with their partners,” McQuivey said. “It’s a little bit of a threat. ‘You should distribute with us because we’re the future, and if you don’t, we don’t need you anyway.”

Andy Forssell, Hulu's senior vice president for content, said the decision to back shows came about naturally. In the course of doing business, Hulu recognized certain shows weren’t getting made that deserve a chance.

But that doesn't mean it can back everything that should get made.

“You have to make some programming choices," Forssell said. "It has to be less hunch driven and more data driven."

When it comes to deciding what to put their resources behind, Netflix, Hulu and Amazon, believe data is the key.

Because they know more about their users’ preferences than anyone else, they can use that to effectively program not only their own original content, but to decide which shows and movies represent savvy investments. Before funding "House of Cards," for example, Netflix looked at various algorithms to see how its members had responded to Kevin Spacey and David Fincher movies.

  “If we can address that audience pool, the only risk is that the show is mediocre," Sarandos offered. "Then we can back into the economics."

 


Via Virginie Colnel
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DISTRUST IS GROWING - 2012 Edelman Trust Barometer: Global Deck


The 2012 Edelman Trust Barometer is the firm’s 12th annual trust and credibility survey.


The survey was produced by research firm StrategyOne and consisted of 20-minute online interviews conducted from October 10 - November 30, 2011.


Here the essential facts:

 

Nearly twice as many countries are sceptics


Business leaders are more trusted than government leaders ...... but

 

- 75 % more trust in social media
- technology remains on top in all markets
- peers and employees see a dramatic rise in credibility

 

How to earn the license to lead


- Exercise principles-based leadership, not rules based performance
- Societal and engagement behaviours will build trust in the future
- Practice of radical transparency / report on goals
-Shape the public discourse on issues of importance to business

 

Edelman Trust Barometer in retrospect


2011 Rise of authority figures
2010 Trust is now an essential line of business
2009 Business must partner with government to regain trust
2008 Young influencers have more trust in business
2007 Business more trusted than government and media
2006 “A person like me” emerges as credible spokesperson
2005 Trust shifts from “authorities” to peers
2004 U.S. companies in Europe suffer trust discount
2003 Earned media more credible than advertising
2002 Fall of the celebrity CEO
2001 Rising Influence of NGOs3

 

Here the slideshare presentation of the survey:

 

http://de.slideshare.net/EdelmanInsights/2012-edelman-trust-barometer-global-deck

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YouTube Re-Imagined: 505,347,842 Channels on Every Single Screen

YouTube Re-Imagined: 505,347,842 Channels on Every Single Screen | The Future of Content | Scoop.it
The old YouTube you knew (and maybe loved!) is gone. It’s been replaced by something that’s a lot more like a play-anywhere, device-agnostic, multi-channel network. It’s becoming a cable network for people who don’t have cable. YouTube doesn’t want you to watch videos anymore — not in the singular sense, at least. It wants you to stick around and see what comes next. It wants you to start watching on your phone as you head home from work, pick up again on your TV as you relax in the evening, and then nod off to its content while you’re lying in bed, as it streams from your tablet.

 

And mostly, YouTube is becoming a backdoor to let Google into your living room, no matter whose set-top box sits on your Ikea MAVA. And so how will YouTube pull this off? Channels.


Via Tina Stock
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My presentation at BDigital Apps in Barcelona (today)

My presentation at BDigital Apps in Barcelona (today) | The Future of Content | Scoop.it
My presentation at BDigital Apps in Barcelona (today): Event details. Twitter buzz. BDigital 2011: Apps and the Future of Content: Social, Local, Mobile, Video,Cloud!
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"Extreme concentration of income is incompatible with real democracy."

"Extreme concentration of income is incompatible with real democracy." | The Future of Content | Scoop.it
“Extreme concentration of income is incompatible with real democracy.” - - Paul Krugman, Oligarchy, American Style
One of the principles of our struggle against the 1%: rules for the reset.
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Gerd Leonhard’s new Kindle book “The Future of Content”

Gerd Leonhard’s new Kindle book “The Future of Content” http://t.co/lCa5PbcV thanks Ajit Jaokar...
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And Go Freemium On Its API

And Go Freemium On Its API | The Future of Content | Scoop.it
I’ve been puzzling over Twitter’s recent tactical moves around their API, Ubermedia and Tweetdeck, for a few months now, and it just doesn’t add up.
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MediaFuturist: New: Portuguese translation of my essay on Content 2.0: protection is in the business model

MediaFuturist: New: Portuguese translation of my essay on Content 2.0: protection is in the business model | The Future of Content | Scoop.it
Content 2.0 essay by Futurist Gerd Leonhard, Portuguese Translation (New: Portuguese version of "Content 2.0: protection is in the business model" thx 2 @pauladneves http://ht.ly/3i3lV PDF: http://ow.ly/d/8Zx)
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Mobile: The Driver of the Future - Brands & Retailers Will Have to Change

Mobile: The Driver of the Future - Brands & Retailers Will Have to Change | The Future of Content | Scoop.it

This article from Mediapost gives you a glimpse into the world of mobile and how it is becoming our conduit to information, communication, engagement and much more.

 

What implications does this have for advertisers and retailers - interesting insights and food for thought.........

 

Mobile today and in the future - here are some highlights:

 

Reading the news, connecting with friends, finding our way, playing games — these are tasks they’ve already commandeered. So why should they not control our homes, plan our vacations, shop(in-store, not just online) and fall in love?

 

“Ten or 15 years from now, literally everything is going to be controlled by your phone,” says Ly Tran, digital marketing director at Proof Advertising. “It’s where we’ll get all our information, communicate and connect. They’re the driver of the future.”


Mobile devices have already revolutionized shopping. Last year, four out of five U.S. smartphone owners used their devices to help with shopping, according to Google/Ipsos. 

 

Such statistics make it tempting to predict the death of brick-and-mortar retail. But rather than cede their business, retailers like Best Buy will be forced to embrace mobile as part of the in-store experience, says Mark Silber, executive creative director of WPP mobile agency Joule.

 

The way retail works now, “you go into Best Buy to check out a TV set and then order it on Amazon,” says Silber. “If Best Buy is interested in surviving, they’re going to have to do something to the in-store experience.”


Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Mobile Marketing Strategy & Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [ http://bit.ly/QHctVZ]

 

 


Via janlgordon, Fuse Mobile
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A full quarter of people use second screens while watching TV - Deloitte

A full quarter of people use second screens while watching TV - Deloitte | The Future of Content | Scoop.it
Nearly a quarter of people (24%) use second screens while watching TV and almost half of all 16-24 year olds use communication tools such as messaging, email, Facebook, or Twitter to discuss what they are watching on TV.

Nearly a quarter of people (24%) use second screens while watching TV and almost half of all 16-24 year olds use communication tools such as messaging, email, Facebook, or Twitter to discuss what they are watching on TV.

The findings come from a survey by Deloitte, which interviewed 2,000 UK respondents aged 16+ about their viewing habits and use of second screens.

It found that despite the rise in second screening people only one in ten people browse the internet for information about the programme they are watching.

Furthermore, 68% of respondents that do use the internet to connect with a programme would not want the websites for products, personalities or adverts that have just been shown on television, to automatically appear on their second screen.

So instead of interacting with the programmes they are watching, people are talking about them with friends. This behaviour is more prominent among younger age groups and gradually declines with age.


Via Gary Hayes, Tina Stock
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"The content industry’s lobbyists have forged two new bills, one in the Senate called Protect IP and..."

"The content industry’s lobbyists have forged two new bills, one in the Senate called Protect IP and..." | The Future of Content | Scoop.it
“The content industry’s lobbyists have forged two new bills, one in the Senate called Protect IP and one in the House called E-Parasites. These bills were written by the content industry without any input from the technology industry.
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MediaFuturist: The Futures Agency is hiring: Content Curator wanted (freelance)

Please spread the word: The Futures Agency is hiring: Content Curator wanted (freelance) http://t.co/sd4zcCoD...
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Virgin Will Price Spotify ‘Significantly Less’ Than Spotify Does

Virgin Will Price Spotify ‘Significantly Less’ Than Spotify Does | The Future of Content | Scoop.it
Virgin Media (NSDQ: VMED) CEO Neil Berkett says he will bundle Spotify with his broadband service for a “very, very low monthly subscription”. (“It’s hard for ISPs to work with the content industry" virgin CEO says.
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The Future of IPR and Copyright (presentation at TedX NewStreet London)

This is my presentation at TedXNew Street London, October 15, 2010, see http://tedxnewst.com/gerd_leonhard.html on the
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